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Cowboy 
ffiatices 



Cowboy 




Collection of 
'Western 
Square 
Dances 

h 

Lloyd Shaw 



With a Foreword by 
Sherwood Anderson 

Appendix Cowboy Dance Tunes 

arranged by 
Frederick Knorr 



Revised Edition 



The CAXTON PRINTERS, Ltd. 

Caldwell, Idaho 

1950 



First printing July, 1939 

Second printing April, 1940 

Third printing December, 1940 

Fourth printing April, 1941 
Fifth printing December, 1941 
Sixth printing, October, 1943 
Seventh printing August, 1945 
Eighth printing October, 1946 
Ninth printing January, 1948 
Tenth printing October, 1948 
Eleventh printing May, 1949 
Twelfth printing January, 1950 



COPYBIGHT 19894949 BY 
THE CAXTON PRINTEBS, I/TO. 
DWBLU IDAHO 







Dorothy 

m^ ; - 
"first lady" 






3 
V- 



Foreword 



DEAR LLOYD SHAW 

I AM a little afraid that anything I could write for the 
book would have to be, perhaps too much, the result of 
a very passing impression. I came up there out of low 
country. It was a day of sharp and rather glorified impres 
sions, the great hills, some snow clad, deep gulches, great 
sense of space. I was rather breathless with wonder. 

I came to see your dancers, and they seemed to me very 
real and very much a part of America. There was a kind 
of rough grace,, sincerity, feeling of fun, joy in living. We 
have had so much, in our romantic literature, of the cow 
boy, shooting up towns, saving fair virgins, being always 
so faultlessly noble under a rough exterior that I was very 
thankful to see something of a more authentic old western 
life brought back in these dances. 

I think there was something the feeling of an early 
America and its joy in a huge new land, something really 
virginal, joyous, good. I felt real play spirit. I wanted to 
stay, take it in, soak it in, see more and more of it. 

I think indeed that you have done something very real. 
The feeling of fun, some joy in living, is too much gone out 
of most of us. You seem to be keeping it alive in these 
dances, and if this passing impression of mine is of any 
value to you, you have certainly my permission to use it. 



Very sincerely, 

SHERWOOD ANDERSON 



Marion, Virginia 



A c know ledgments 



IN A COMPILATION such as this, where so many have 
helped, even when they did not know that they were 
helping, it is almost impossible to render the thanks that are 
due. There are the fine groups of old-timers who have taken 
me in and let me dance with them and have answered all the 
"greenhorn" questions I could ask. There are the different 
dancers and callers whom I have met only casually, but 
many of whom have dropped a phrase or an idea that I 
have laid hold upon. To all of them my heartiest thanks ! 

Many of the calls are such common property that it 
would be impossible to assign them to any given caller ; but 
of the many callers I have known I want to give special 
thanks to Guy Parker, Emerson Howard, W, S. Uhls, A. E, 
Christensen, Theiron Gilbert, and Clarence McComb. None 
of them, however, can be held responsible for any errors 
that may have crept into the book. Just a few days ago 
one of them said to me, "Well, professor, you don't call 'em 
the way I do. But that's all right with me, if you're satis 
fied." Alas, I am not. I owe much to the fiddlers, also, 
"E. G.," Nick, Fred, Smokey, and Dad; and to Harriett 
Johnson my accompanist who has so often and so pa 
tiently helped me "work out a new find." 

One of the most difficult parts of preparing the book 
has been to secure photographs of the actual dances that 
would adequately show the action of each figure. Loyde E. 
Knuteon has taken well over five hundred pictures from 
which I might choose my illustrations. For these fine pic 
tures and for his splendid co-operation I acknowledge a 
special debt of gratitude. 

In the specific preparation of the book I wish to express 
appreciation to Henry Ford for permission to adapt the 



8 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

Sing-ing Quadrille from one of his publications and to John 
A. Lomax to use James Barton Adams' delightful poem, 
"At a Cowboy Dance/' from Songs of the Cattle Trail and 
Cow Camps. Also I wish to give my special thanks to Jack 
Allison for the pictures taken at Central City. And thanks 
to Lefty Hays and to Doli Shaw, my daughter, for the 
diagrams, and to Marshall Morin for lettering them, and 
to Dub Smith, my "strummer," for the little music scores. 
Lastly, to my wife and daughter more than thanks for so 
carefully going over and over the manuscript for me, and 
for having so patiently listened while I talked and talked 
and talked. 

L. S. 



Preface 



Tj^OR MANY YEARS a group of young people at the 
-F Cheyenne Mountain High School has been working in 
the field of the European folk dance under my direction. 
They have been called upon to give exhibitions of those de 
lightful peasant dances before all sorts of audiences and 
in widely separated places. 

As we went ahead, demonstrating these folk dances of 
Europe, we became more acutely aware of the fact that 
there was, all about us, an old American folk tradition of 
purely Western dancing that we should explore. Already 
we were using the New England Quadrilles, New England 
Circle Dances, such as Soldiers Joy or the Cicillian Circle, 
many of the line dances or contra dances, such as Money 
Musk, Pop Goes the Weazel, Speed the Plough, and others. 
But we could not seem to get hold of the purely Western 
square dances that our cowboys had enjoyed on the ranches 
and in the cow towns of the West. 

We could find no printed instructions or calls in spite 
of diligent searching; and our experiences with old-time 
callers were most discouraging. There was nothing we 
could get our hands on. At last a rancher down below 
Cheyenne Mountain, who had been a cowboy in his early 
days and had since called many an old-time dance, came 
to me and asked if I could furnish one set (four couples) 
of my dancers to join with a set of his young people in a 
square-dance contest that he was entering. It was just the 
start we needed. 

Guy Parker was not only a "caller," but also something 
of an artist and poet in his own right. He understood my 
young folks, and it was- no time at all until we were in the 
full swing of his dances. We refused our share of the prize 



10 PREFACE 

money that we had helped him win in the contest, so in 
order to pay us back he insisted on coming to the school 
and teaching us all the old dances he could remember. 

Once started, it was easy. To our surprise we found 
there were little groups of old-timers who got together reg 
ularly for the old-fashioned dances, out on the plains, up 
in the mountains, even in the city itself. They most gen 
erously welcomed us to their dances. By writing down calls 
on old envelopes or scraps of paper, I soon found quite a 
collection accumulating. One thing leading to another soon 
brought me into contact with many fine old callers. I could 
swap some of my variations for some of theirs. And they 
generously gave me of their store. 

I soon found myself on the trail of the old square dance, 
wherever I went in the West. It was a mild sort of research 
in Western Americana and proved most delightful. 

Now, instead of merely demonstrating these fine old 
dances, we found ourselves being asked to teach groups 
how to dance : high school, college, adult groups, all finding 
it a most contagious sort of fun. 

Gradually we perfected a technique by which we could 
soon get any group quickly through that trying period of 
"initial diffuse movements/' and before the evening was 
half over they would all be dancing with a reckless abandon, 
and near enough correctly to make the evening a hilarious 
success. 

But, of course, they could not carry on by themselves. 
Closely directed, they could dance. But without help it all 
slipped out of mind and was lost. I tried to have some of the 
old-time callers help them, but it would not work. In the 
first place, they were not teachers and did not quite know 
what to do with a bunch of "plumb greenhorns." In the 
second place, so many of the old-fashioned callers use a 
sort of running doggerel, mostly rhythm, that is often 
hardly recognizable as words. Only to the experienced do 
their inflections mean anything, and to them it is the inflec 
tion rather than the unrecognizable word that directs them 
through the figures. With beginners, most of these callers 
proved more of a confusion than a help. 

After much inquiry and patient searching I was able to 
find only one little pamphlet of directions and calls, and it 
was difficult to get hold of. Dozens and dozens of leads were 
given me, but whenever I ran them down they were "call 



PREFACE 11 

books" of New England Quadrilles and not the cowboy 
dances that I was seeking. 

It seemed to me that if the groups we had started were 
to carry on, they would have to have a manual, not only of 
directions and calls, but a book that could lead any group 
of beginners through the first confusing stages of the dance. 

In the summer of 1936 I was invited to bring a set of my 
dancers to the famous play festival at Central City as an 
experiment in early-day fun. The dances caught like fire. 
In the old dining room of the famous Teller House we held 
forth and we found young society folk, actors from the cur 
rent play, visiting artists, celebrities, everyone dancing" with 
us. For the next two summers we took over the old William's 
Livery Stable at Central City and danced every day for the 
two or three weeks of the festival. With these shifting 
crowds we had to refine our technique so that they could 
catch on quickly. This experience convinced me that any 
group could start out alone if simple progressive directions 
and a manual of the simpler calls were available. This 
little book is the outgrowth of that conviction. 

I hope that later I may be able to assemble a more com 
plete book of calls, with all the variations and all the more 
intricate changes added. I have nearly a hundred dances 
now in my own notebook and I am convinced there are more 
than twice that many extant. I would very much appreciate 
it if anyone having other calls or variations of calls would 
be good enough to write them down and send them to me. 
Perhaps then we could get them all collected in one volume. 
And credit, of course, will be given in the proposed book to 
each contributor who sends in a new call. 

Such a book would of course be a reference book of calls, 
with definitions of terms used, and instructions properly 
and logically and somewhat coldly arranged. 

But this present volume is no such thing. It proposes 
to be a very personal, chatty sort of manual. I wish to write 
it as if I were standing at your elbow and helping you with 
your first dance. It is not primarily intended for those 
groups that are already successfully organized with a 
caller and plenty of calls of their own, and already dancing 
well. Of course, if they should chance upon the book and 
find anything of value in it for themselves, I should be very 
glad. But this book is intended for beginners, who are 
beginning at the very beginning. And it hopes to give them 



12 PREFACE 

enough help to carry them into a new realm of most 
delightful fun. 

In many different places I have seen groups of beginners 
trying to do these old dances. Without an experienced 
caller, without authentic calls, without much of an idea of 
the form of the old dances, they try to make up for their 
lack with a boundless enthusiasm. They need help. The 
time seems ripe for a revival. Seeing these old dances take 
hold so contagiously makes me hope that they may spread to 
hundreds of groups all over the country who are eager for 
good, wholesome, social fun. 

But besides the dancers and the young of heart who wish 
to "shake a wicked hoof" around a square, I have found an 
increasing number of people who are interested in the old 
dances for their historic and literary significance. They are 
a living bit of the colorful days of the Old West. Beaten 
out by hand in the crude forge room of necessity, they are 
an authentic witness of the life of our fathers. Perforce the 
work of amateurs, of pioneer spirits, they were fashioned 
from old fragments of dances that had been carried by ox 
team from many lands. Each phrase of their apparently 
meaningless chatter appears to have a significance and a 
history that makes it fascinating to the student of words or 
of peoples. 

I have had letters from many writers and students about 
the dances, and a book might be written for them alone. But 
it would lose its flavor. The dances would be like dead ants 
preserved in the amber of the past. We want them stingingly 
alive and danceable. We want them as real as the varmints 
the cowboys sang about 

"The sand burrs prevail 
And so do the ants 
And those who sit down 
Need half -soles on their pants." 

Unless you are half-souled, don't sit down with them in 
your study chair. Get a group of friends together and dance 
them. Then their literary significance and their full flavor 
will be yours. 

Coombe-Corrie 
January, 1939 



r 



V 



Table 

of 
Contents 



FOREWORD 7 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 9 

PREFACE 11 

PART I THE DANCES 
At a Cowboy Dance, poem 23 

Chapter 1 

WE TALK IT OVER 25 

The Probable Origins of the Dances 25 

The New England Quadrille 27 

The Kentucky Running Set 29 

The Tide Comes Back 31 

The Music 33 

Chapter 2 

THE FIRST DANCE 38 

The Caller 38 

Circle Two-step 42 

The Steps 45 

The Two-step 46 

Allemande Left and Grand Right and Left 47 

Variations 53 

Chapter 3 

A SIMPLE SQUARE 56 

The Positions 57 

The Introduction 58 

Fdrm a Star with the Right Hand Cross 62 

Forward Six and Fall Back Six 66 

Chapter 4 

THE ROUND DANCES 70 

The Rye Waltz 71 

The Schottische 73 

The Varsouvianna , 78 



14 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

The Polka 90 

The Waltz 94 

Waltzing in a Square 96 

Pursuit Waltz 97 

Waltz Turn within a Square 99 

Waltz Balance or Dip 100 

Spanish Waltz 101 

Modern Waltz 102 

Chapter 5 

MORE SQUARES 104 

Forming a Set 104 

Docey-doe 104 

Origins 105 

Directions 108 

Variations 117 

The Lady Round the Lady and the Gent So Low 117 

The Simpler Squares 120 

Endings and Beginnings 121 

Chapter 6 

TYPES OF DANCES 123 

Pop Goes the Weasel 123 

Virginia Reel 124 

Right and Left Through 127 

Ladies Chain 127 

TYPES OF WESTERN SQUARES 131 

The Docey-doe Type 131 

Second Couple Follow Up 135 

Split-the-Ring Type 136 

Symmetrical Type 138 

The Single Visitor Type 138 

Promenade the Outside King 138 

Intermingling Type 139 

Irregular Types 141 

Original Dances " 142 

Exhibition Dances 142 

Little Children 143 

PART II THE CALLS 
THE FRAMEWORK 147 

Introductions 147 

Endings "... 151 

Finish Phrases 160 

Docey-doe Calls 160 

THE DANCES 
Docey-doe Group 165 

Star by the Right .! 167 

Lady Round the Lady 170 

Two Gents Swing with the Elbow Swing : 172 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 15 

Step Right Up and Swing Her Awhile 174 

I'll Swing Your Girl; You Swing Mine 176 

Swing at the Wall 178 

Go Round and Through 180 

Him and Her 182 

The Girl I Left Behind Me 184 

Birdie in a Cage 187 

The Lady Walks Round 189 

The Dollar Whirl 191 

The Butterfly Whirl 193 

The Lady Round Two ... 195 

Dive for the Oyster 197 

Eight Hands Over 200 

Right and Left Group 205 

Promenade the Outside Ring and Docey-doe 206 

Promenade the Inside Ring 208 

Right and Left 211 

Swing Your Opposite All Alone 213 

Change and Swing Half 215 

Right and Left Four and Six 217 

Right and Left Four and the Center Couple Swing.... 220 

Right and Left Back and Both Couples Swing 222 

Right and Left Through and Swing That Girl 

Behind You 224 

Single Visitor Group 227 

Adam and Eve 228 

Old Arkansaw 230 

Cheat and Swing 232 

Bow and Kneel to That Lady 234 

Honor That Lady 236 

Docey Out As She Comes In 238 

Swing the Right Hand Gent with the Right Hand 

Round 241 

Don't You Touch Her 244 

Lady Go Halfway Round Again 246 

Promenade Your Corners Round 249 

Take Her Right Along 250 

Yaller Gal 252 

Buffaloes and Injuns 254 

Line Dances 257 

Forward Up Six 258 

Forward Six and Fall Back Eight 261 

Four in a Center Line 264 

Figure Eight 267 

Grapevine Twist 271 

Rattlesnake Twist 274 

Grapevine Twist (Garden Variety) 276 

Bird in a Cage and Allemande Six 278 

Four Leaf Clover 280 

Indian Circle 282 

Divide-the-Ring Group 285 

Divide the Ring and Cut Away Four , 286 

Split the Ring and Allemande 288 



16 TABLE OP CONTENTS 

Divide the Ring and Swing Corners 290 

Divide the Ring and Docey Partners 292 

Divide the Ring and Corners Bow 294 

Divide the Ring Combination 296 

Divide the Ring and Forward Up Six 298 

Divide the Ring and Waltz Corners 300 

Waltz Quadrille 303 

Symmetrical Danoes 307 

Four Gents Lead Out 308 

Texas Star 310 

Swing at the Center and Swing at the Sides 312 

Sides Divide 314 

Run Away to Alabam' 316 

The Ocean Wave 318 

Pokey Nine 321 

The Singing Quadrille 324 

Waltz That Girl Behind You 321 

Intermingling Dances 335 

Grand March Change , 336 

Inside Arch 341 

Arch and Under for the Length of the Hall 343 

Three Ladies Change 346 

Four Ladies Change the Length of the Hall 349 

Right and Left Through the Length of the Hall 351 

Forward and Back Eight 356 

Double Bow Knot 358 

Dive and Rescue the Lady , 361 

Four Gents Cross Right Hands 364 

GLOSSARY 367 



APPENDIX COWBOY DANCE TUNES 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 374 

COWBOY DANCE TUNES 375 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 395 

INDEX 415 



r 



J 
v 



List 

of 
Illustrations 



Cheyenne Mountain Dancers at Central City, Colorado Frontispiece 

Allemande Left (series) 48-49 

Grand Right and Left (series) 51-52 

Typical Square (diagram) 56 

An Introduction ( series) 59-61 

The Schottische (series) , 74-75 

The Varsouvianna (series) 80-85 

The Polka 91 

Waltzing in a square 96 

Pursuit waltz 97 

Waltz turn within a square 99 

Spanish waltz 101 

Modern waltz step 102 

Dos-a-dos (series) 106-107 

Docey-doe (series) 110-15 

Eight and left through (series) 128-30 

Ladies chain ( series ) 132-34 

Back with the left and don't get lost 167 

Lady round the lady and the gent so low 170 

Two gents swing with the elbow swing , 172 

Step right back and watch 'em grin 174 

I'll swing your girl, you swing mine 176 

Through that couple and swing in the hall 178 

Go through and around and both couples swing 180 

The gent around the lady and the lady round the gent 182 

Promenade in single file 185 

With a birdie in a cage and three hands round 187 

Turn a three hand set and the lady ballonet 189 

Change again and swing her six bits 191 

And don't forget the Butterfly Whirl 193 

The lady round two and the gent fall through 195 

Dive for the oyster 197 

Flap those girls and flap like thunder 200 



18 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Right and left with the couple you meet 207 

Two ladies change 209 

Ladies circle four in the center of the set, 

Two gents turn in a little side bet 211 

Half promenade 213 

Change and swing half 215 

Right and left six 217 

Right and left four and the center couple swing 221 

Right and left back and both couples swing 223 

And swing that girl behind you 225 

And swing Miss Eve 228 

Swing your paw 230 

Cheat or swing 232 

Kneel to that lady 234 

Honor that lady 236 

Allemande left and allemande aye, 

Ingo bingo six penny high 239 

Birdie in the center and seven hands round 242 

Right and left grand but don't you touch 'em 245 

The gent docey around these three 247 

Promenade your corners round 249 

Change and swing and take her right along 251 

Four little yaller gals out around the ring 253 

Four little buffaloes and three Injuns out around the ring 254 

Forward up two and fall back two 259 

Forward six and eight fall back 262 

Side couples right and left along that four 265 

Cut a figure eight with the lady in the lead 268 

Twist 'em right, now twist 'em wrong 272 

First gent lead down the rattlesnake's hole 274 

Out to the center with a haw and a gee 276 

Bird in a cage with five hands round 278 

Promenade close like a four leaf clover 281 

Promenade in single file, 

Lady in the lead and Indian style 283 

Down the center and cut away four 286 

Swing when you meet both head and feet 289 

Swing 'em on the corner as you come around 290 

Docey corners, don't you fall 292 

Corners bow 294 

All run away with the corner girl 296 

Down the center and divide the ring 

The lady go right and the gent go left 299 

Swing on the corner with a waltz promenade 301 

The lady back center and the gent stay outside , 303 

Give 'em a swing. . , . It's allemande left 308 

Ladies swing in and the gents swing out 310 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 19 

Swing at the center and swing at the sides 312 

Change and swing the center and swing the sides 315 

Let 'em stand and the gents run away to Alabam' 317 

Ocean wave 319 

Three by three in a pokey nine 321 

Dos-a-dos your partners 324 

The lady goes right and the gent he goes left 325 

Your left hand on your corner 326 

Pass 'em by the left 332 

Down the center four by four 337 

All eight balance 341 

Inside arch and outside under for the length of the hall 343 

Three ladies change 346 

Three ladies change the length of the hall 347 

Right and left the length of the hall 351 

Forward eight and fall back eight 356 

Tie 'em up in a double bow knot 358 

Dive and rescue the lady 361 

Four gents cross right hands 364 



Part 
I 

The 
Dances 



r 



At 
a 

Cowboy 
Dcmce 



Git yo' little sagehens ready ; 
Trot 'em out upon the floor 
Line up there, you critters! Steady! 
Lively, now ! One couple more. 
Shorty, shed that ol' sombrero ; 
Broncho, douse that cigaret; 
Stop yer cussin', Casimero, 
Tore the ladies. Now, all set : 

S'lute yer ladies, all together; 
Ladies opposite the same; 
Hit the lumber with yer leather ; 
Balance all an* swing yer dame ; 
Bunch the heifers in the middle ; 
Circle stags an' do-ce-do; 
Keep a-steppin j to the fiddle; 
Swing 'em round an' off you go. 

First four forward. Back to places. 
Second foller. Shuffle back- 
Now you've got it down to cases 
Swing 'em till their trotters crack. 
Gents all right a-heel an' toein' ; 
Swing 'em kiss 'em if yo' kin 
On to next an' keep a-goin' 
Till yo' hit yer pards agin. 

Gents to center. Ladies 'round 'em; 
Form a basket ; balance all ; 
Swing yer sweets to where yo' found 'em ; 
All p'mnade around the hall. 



24 COWBOY DANCES 

Balance to yer pards an' trot 'em 
'Round the circle double quick; 
Grab an' squeeze 'em while you've got 'em 
Hold 'em to it if they kick. 

Ladies, left hand to yer sonnies ; 
Alaman ; grand right an' left ; 
Balance all an' swing yer honies 
Pick 'em up an' feel their heft. 
All p'mnade like skeery cattle ; 
Balance all an' swing yer sweets ; 
Shake yer spurs an' make 'em rattle 
Keno! Promenade to seats. 

JAMES BARTON ADAMS 



Chapter 1 

r 



3 



We 
Talk 

It 
Over 



T 7ERY OFTEN at some dinner table or in some informal 
\ group, the discussion has turned to my strange enthusi 
asm for the old dances of the past, and I have found enough 
interest and curiosity developed to lead directly to the 
formation of a little group of friends who decided to join 
with me and to try a bit of the dancing for themselves. 

It is the natural way to start talk it over and then try 
a dance or two. One has to know what it is all about first. 
One naturally wonders where the dances came from, what 
their relationship may be to other forms of dancing. Are 
they still being done today? Just what do we mean by a 
square dance? Where is the sport? 

So let's talk it over informally. Much that we say will 
have to be speculative. But guessing is good fun, and it 
often arouses more interest than a cold array of scientific 
and carefully classified facts. 

When it comes to finding the origins of the Western 
square dance, for instance, one simply has to speculate. 
The dances and the calls, except in rare cases, were never 
written down, but were transmitted from caller to caller 
by the oral route. And all the footnotes and references and 
authorities are lost in the process. 

One old caller said to me in answer to my question about 
a certain call, "Well, I reckon I don't know! My daddy 
always called it this away. But he said his daddy had a 
plumb different way, and I never felt sure about it. There's 
something the matter with that call, and I don't like it. I 
never use it unless I got to." A year later, in another place, 
I found what I suspect of being a variation of the old grand- 
daddy's call. At least it was more complete and gave sense 
to the bobtailed lines he had used. 



26 COWBOY DANCES 

But where did the granddaddy get the original call ? We 
can only guess. Back in the mist of the past, moving down 
from father to son, from community to community, the old 
calls spread without chronicler and without record. Usually 
something was lost at each step from the original call, until 
some semicreative natural genius, who liked to keep a con 
tinuous patter of words going all the time, filled in the omis 
sion with new words of his own, and a new variant was born. 
But someone always protests that he has seen many an 
old call book his aunt or his cousin still has a copy in the 
family trunk. I have patiently run down dozens of these 
old books, and so far they have always been call books of 
New England quadrilles. And that is a different fish. New 
England turned naturally to books. But these old Western 
square dances grew up without benefit of letters. 

Had these Western dances been the dances of scholars, 
every variant would have been recorded and fully anno 
tated. Chronologies and pedigrees and records would have 
been kept. But these were the dances of country folk, who 
kept all their essential knowledge written only on the un 
certain pages of memory ! They were the dances of laconic 
folk who didn't tell all they knew even under questioning!* 
They were often the dances of secretive folk who were 
somewhat jealous of their special talent and special 
knowledge. 

So all we have to go by in our speculations is the internal 
evidence presented by the dances themselves. Fascinated 
with bits of this evidence, I have pieced out the following 
theory as my own explanation of the possible origin of the 
Western dances. 

I believe the two main sources to have been the New 
England Quadrille and the Kentucky Running Set. In ad 
dition, perhaps the Mexicans contributed something in the 
way of steps, but their dances are usually not "called." And 
lastly, I feel sure that some of the figures of the Western 
dance were borrowed directly from old European folk 
dances. 

It will pay us to have a look at the two main probable 
sources of our Western dance. 



WE TALK IT OVER 27 

The New England Quadrille 

The New England or early American Quadrille was, of 
course, an adaptation of a European dance. Usually France 
is given credit for the origin of this form, although dances 
executed by four couples arranged in a square figure with 
a couple on each side of the square are found in the peasant 
dances of nearly all the European countries. Undoubtedly 
many of these contributed to the formal Quadrille which 
was finally perfected in France and in England. 

The Quadrille at the height of its favor was usually 
danced in five parts, with a pause in the music between 
each part and usually a complete change of the music for 
each part. This tradition of five parts still persists in our 
American Quadrille even when two parts are combined. It 
is amusing to read in the introductions of some of our old 
call books, that a Quadrille is always danced in five parts, 
and then to search in vain through the book for a single 
dance that has all five parts still separate and distinct. 
Most of them are numbered, "one-three-five," or "one-two- 
four," still preserving the tradition while saving only three 
parts of the dance. This probably developed through having 
only three parts to the music with two pauses. Even then 
the American forms of the dance retained all five parts, but 
with two pairs coalesced. 

Unlike a Western dance, in the Quadrille the head couple 
was numbered "one/' the opposite couple "two," the side 
couple to the right "three," and the side couple to the left, 
"four." In the first figure, after a general introduction, the 
opposite couples maneuvered with each other in a variety of 
patterns across the set. In the other figures all four couples 
maneuvered together around the square which became a 
circle of dancing action. Only occasionally did the first 
couple execute a maneuver with the right-hand couple, then 
on to the opposite couple and finally to the couple on the left, 
thus working as it were around the square. In the more 
formal quadrilles, this movement was always in the fourth 
part and was named "The Visit." But this pattern of work 
ing around the set is the standard form of the Western 
Square Dance, as we shall later see. 

The music for the Quadrille was precise, measured, and 
accurately correlated with the figures and with the calls. 
For proper execution the dancers should have been trained 



28 COWBOY DANCES 

by a dancing master. These conditions were, of course, 
quite impossible on the ranches of the West. 

Do you recall that fine description of a dance in Owen 
Wister's The Virginian, where the cowboys swapped the 
swaddling clothes of the sleeping infants? Imagine what 
that bunch would have done with a French dancing master 
counting "one-two-three." Distances were great in the 
West. Dances could not be the affair of one small community. 
From a hundred or more miles in every direction the dancers 
would come. Some had just moved into the country from 
Iowa. Some had drifted up from Texas. Some had followed 
the herds down from summer grass in Montana. They could 
not possibly do a precise and measured Quadrille. They 
needed something simple in pattern that a man could learn 
quickly, if he knew something like it back on his own 
ranch, and with a good running call that would tell him what 
to do even if he didn't. Thus developed a true Western 
dance built on the New England square framework. 

There are many call books available for the New Eng 
land Quadrilles ; but I believe the best book for anyone who 
is interested in these fine old dances is Good Morning, by 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ford. Mr. Ford has done a splendid 
thing in preserving the very best of these fine dances. He 
has brought together the most skillful of the old fiddlers, the 
finest of the old callers, and with his staff of expert assist 
ants has made a complete study of the Quadrille. In his book 
are full and excellent directions for dancing not only the old 
Quadrilles but also most of the lovely "round dances" which 
were the favorites of an earlier generation. 

Any group wanting to have joyous fun, the exhilaration 
of "real dancing," and the fascination of working out the 
lovely patterns of these classic Quadrilles can do no better 
than to turn to Good Morning and dance it through from 
cover to cover, though they will have to see many a "good 
morning" dawn before the job is done. 

These New England Quadrilles are so well known that 
it is only natural that they should popularly be thought the 
chief source of the Western dance. And they surely con 
tributed much, especially through such forms as the Sing 
ing Quadrille and similar dances in which the call is sung, 
with words and music fixed. 

But probably the Quadrille is only a tributary. The main 
stream, I believe, heads in the Kentucky Mountains. 



WE TALK IT OVER 29 

The Kentucky Running Set 

In the mountains of Kentucky, and throughout the 
Southern Appalachians, an old form of dance called the 
Running Set has survived. Cecil Sharp, the great authority 
on Country Dances of England, discovered the dance on his 
visit to this country in 1917, and proclaimed it as one of 
the purest and oldest dance forms of England. When first 
told of the dance, he avoided it because he believed it to be 
"a rough, uncouth dance, remarkable only as an exhibition 
of agility and physical endurance." When he finally chanced 
to see it danced, he was fascinated by its beauty or aesthetic 
quality and by its historic significance. He made a careful 
study of it and wrote a booklet on his findings which he 
published as Part V of his authoritative study of English 
dancing, The Country Dance Book. 

In this little volume one immediately recognizes the 
source of much that we find in the Western Square Dance. 
The call and the spirit of the running set are much closer to 
the Western form than is the New England Quadrille. 

In the Running Set as many dancers as wish to may join 
the figure, standing in couples in a huge circle. The dance 
can follow many patterns, but here is a typical form. After 
an introductory circle left similar to the introduction of the 
Western dance, the first couple moves to the second and 
executes a special figure, then on to the next couple and 
repeats this figure. As they go on to the fourth couple, the 
second couple folloivs up and executes the same figure with 
the third couple, and then follows behind the first couple 
and repeats the figure with each couple in the ring. As soon 
as possible, the third couple folloivs up and dances with the 
fourth, and then follows around the ring. This goes on until 
every couple has followed in a sort of looping or crocheting 
chain stitch of continuous ,and furious dancing. 

The figures that they execute between couple and couple 
not only bear a resemblance to the Western figures but in 
some cases are identical. And the do-si-do, with which each 
couple ties off when they finish the circle, survives in an 
altered form in the Western dance. 

Miss Ida Levin has published more recently a little vol 
ume called Kentucky Square Dances. In this, the same Run 
ning Set is danced as a square, and the similarity to the 
Western dance is even more evident. While saying that any 



30 COWBOY DANCES 

number of couples may participate in the Running Set, Mr. 
Sharp, it should be pointed out, also says that it is usually 
danced as a square with four couples. 

He concluded, after a careful study from internal evi 
dence of the Running Set, that it is the earliest known form 
of English Country Dance, earlier than any dance described 
in Playford's famous English Dancing Master (1650), the 
earliest known book on English dancing. The complete ab 
sence of courtesy movements is one bit of evidence for this 
conclusion. There is no French bowing or saluting before 
the dance begins. In Playford's dances the court influence 
is already felt and the courtesy movements have been 
introduced. 

Mr. Sharp was, of course, delighted with his discovery 
of this earliest form of English dance. And not only does he 
feel its connection with the May-day Round, which was the 
source of all English country dances, and which was a 
"pagan quasi-religious ceremonial," but he definitely traces 
three of the figures which he found in the Kentucky Moun 
tains back to their ancient pagan ceremonials ; one he con 
nects with well worship, one with druidic tree worship, and 
one is in the serpentine form of the Hey with its established 
religious or magical significance. 

It is not surprising that this missing link of the English 
Country Dances should be found in our Appalachians. Ety 
mologists have pointed out for some time that the phrases 
and words and pronunciations of these hill people are almost 
pure Elizabethan English. Isolated and changeless in their 
mountains, they have preserved the pure English of Shake 
speare, which we in our modern development or degenera 
tion laugh at as the talk of hillbillies. In the same way they 
have jealously preserved the ancient dance forms. Their 
ancestors in northern England and in the lowlands of Scot 
land as stubbornly preserved the true dances of their people 
and would have nothing to do with the innovations which 
Playford describes as the dances of London. When these 
people moved to this country, they still held their ancient 
forms unchanged and crystallized, fossils, if you will, for 
all time. 

And these Kentucky Dances are surely the chief forbears 
of the Western dance. The names of some of the dances are 
identical : Lady Round the Lady, Birdie in a Cage, Ladies in 
the Center, Figure Eight. Unlike the Quadrille, whose 



WE TALK IT OVER 31 

couples are numbered in opposite pairs, the couples here are 
numbered "one-two-three" around the circle to the right as 
in our Western dance. With a little preliminary explanation 
any group of Western dancers could instantly pick up and 
execute the Kentucky dances in no time at all. Through the 
Ozark Mountains of Missouri, where they are still danced 
in an intermediate form, these dances probably moved on to 
the West and developed a distinct form of their own to suit 
the needs of our early pioneers. 

To be sure, our Western dance has the courtesy move 
ments, such as Honors right and honors left, and much bow 
ing and saluting of the ladies. And this, of course, is de 
rived from the New England Quadrille, along with such 
figures as Right and left through, Two ladies change, etc. 
But primarily, and at its very heart, I believe the Western 
dance stems back to the pagan ceremonials of our English 
ancestors by way of the Kentucky Running Set. 

The Tide Comes Back 

A book has just come to my desk which interests me very 
much. Written most delightfully by two simon-pure New 
Englafcders, Tolman and Page, it gives a picture of the 
present-day New England dance as done in New Hamp 
shire. They call it The Country Dance Book, probably quite 
unaware that Cecil Sharp had used that title before them. 
And as they say, "like a frog hollerin' for his own puddle/' 
they describe their village dance quite unconcerned and en 
tirely unaware of the square dance as danced in other parts 
of the country. 

The fascinating thing to me is the internal evidence in 
the dances they describe of the impact of the Western 
dance on their present-day New England forms. The waves 
that rolled out from Kentucky and New England have 
washed together and broken against the cliif s of the Rocky 
Mountains and have now surged back with a new impulse 
that is apparently felt all over New England. The tide 
comes back. 

The modern dances they describe are freer, a little more 
irregular, a little more hilarious. I am sure they would 
distress a dancing master of half a century ago. And the 
"prompter" of that elder day with his clipped, terse direc 
tions, is being replaced by a "caller" who fills in with a 



32 COWBOY DANCES 

constant line of patter which never ceases, and which has a 
suspiciously Western tang. 

And why not? There has been a constant interplay be 
tween the East and the West in every other field of interest. 
And our pioneer cities in the West also had their formal 
dances given by the "best people" fifty years ago, and the 
quadrilles and lancers were as exact and precise as any in 
New England. But gradually the sagebrush and the cow 
camp pushed in on them with an uncouth modification of the 
Kentucky dance, and the do-si-do put on a white collar, 
celluloid perhaps, and mingled with those "best people." 

I treasure a little leather-bound manuscript book of 
dance calls written in letter-plate longhand by a doctor- 
druggist in one of our Colorado cities of half a century ago. 
He called their dances for them and he must have called 
them elegantly. Every dance is as formal and precise and 
measured as his beautiful chirography, and it is 100 per cent 
New England throughout the book. 

Tolman and Page describe a couple of dances which they 
say originated in New York. (Is not New York almost the 
"West" to them?) In some parts of New England, they 
say, "These dances were regarded with contempt reserved 
for the foreigner. But the newer generation found them 
fun to do and so they became established." And there is the 
whole story in a nutshell. The modified Western dances were 
carried back to New England by returning sons, and the 
young people found them fun to do. 

Where were they modified ? I have a friend from Indiana 
who feels that they started there, but another friend from 
Illinois feels that his state deserves the credit. Iowa could 
make out one of the finest claims, if Missouri didn't have so 
much to say. And Kansas can do some "hollerin' " on her 
own account. 

We of the Rocky Mountains must be careful not to con 
sider all these states to the east of us as part of "the East," 
and our dances as "Western." Here in the high, dry country, 
alas, Texas and Oklahoma, Montana and Wyoming, Arizona 
and New Mexico, all feel they have a more important part 
in the picture than even my beloved Colorado. And from 
across the mountains come voices from Utah and Idaho and 
California calling, "If you want to see the real Western 
dance, come out here!" The waves chop back and forth 
against each other and confuse us as to the original impulses. 



WE TALK IT OVER 33 

Perhaps one day they will all quiet down to one great Ameri 
can folk-dance form. Perhaps on the great natural proving 
ground of the cattle range, the last American frontier, where 
virile youth wanted an hilarious good time, the cowboy 
dance proved to be the survival of the fittest of the American 
folk dance forms, and may be this great American dance. 

It would shock my New England friends to hear an old 
Colorado rancher ask me if I ever danced Hell's Victory. 
From his description I was sure of the dance and told him 

it was Hull's Victory, not "Hell's" "Hull's Victory with 

his famous ship The Constitution." "No, no!" he says, "it's 
Hell's Victory! Called it that ever since I w r as a boy!" The 
waves chop back and forth. And it won't be long until a 
Western docey-doe will feel quite at home in a New England 
parlor. 

The Music 

It is often asked if it is not almost impossible for a 
modern group to try these dances because it would be so- 
difficult to find an old fiddler who could give the calls. And 
there is always surprise at the answer that very seldom 
does the fiddler do the calling. All you need is floor space, 
a piano, and anyone who knows the call and the dance can 
start without any special music. The cowboy dance is not 
bound to the tradition of any unusual set of musical instru 
ments. Every saloon and every dance hall had its honky- 
tonk piano. The piano is part of its authentic tradition. 

For beginners any of the old standard, monotonous, 
rhythmic tunes, played on the piano in 2/4 or 6/8 time, such 
as "Turkey in the Straw," "Arkansas Traveler," or the 
famous old jigs and reels will do. To be any fun the dances 
have to be held up to a good tempo, and I prefer the 2/4 time. 
The 6/8 time is apt to be rather fatiguing to your musician, 
repeating itself indefinitely through the long figure of the 
dance. It is very apt to become slow with a little rocking- 
horse repetition. And yet I must admit some of the best 
old fiddlers seem to prefer this slower 6/8 rhythm. 

I have asked some of my fiddler friends to list for me 
their favorite tunes for square dancing. They have each 
listed ten personal favorites which I have grouped as "a"; 
then the ten that they play frequently but not so often as 
"b"; and finally, the ten that they play only occasionally. 



34 COWBOY DANCES 

However, they say it depends on the time and the crowd as 
to which is their favorite and they never feel quite alike. 
Since the names as well as the tunes are traditional and oral, 
I have left them in their original spelling to illustrate this 
point. 

Emerson G. Howard's favorites are: ^ 

a. Soldiers Joy, Wild Horse, Heel and Toe Polkie, 
Mississippi Sawyer, Flute Music, Girl I left Behind 
Me, Paddie won't you Drink Some, Don't You 
Want to go to Heaven Uncle Joe, Durang Horn 
Pipe, and Grey Eagle. 

Selections For Waltzes 

b. Over the Waves, Peek a Boo, Doris Loan, My Little 
WEE Dog, Bohemian Waltz, Rock the Little Baby 
to Sleep, Dream Waltz, He's Sleeping In the Klon 
dike Vail to Nite, Matcaisy, and Home Sweet 
Home. 

c. Red Bird, Buffalo Girls are you coming out to-nite, 
Irish Wash Woman, Wagner, Louie Reak, Fisher 
Hornpipe, Golden Slippers, Turkey in the Straw, 
Give the Fiddler A Dram, and Casie Jones. 

You will notice that "E. G." has put in ten favorite 
waltzes in place of group b of the square dance tunes. I am 
tempted to comment on many of the tunes in these lists, but 
a few comments will illustrate my point sufficiently well. 
Take the Dream Waltz in the above list as an example. "E. 
G." tells me that he had played all night for a dance down 
in Woodward County, Oklahoma. At dawn he lay down for 
a little nap before having to go to work. When he awoke a 
strange tune was singing itself in his head. He got out his 
old fiddle and played it till he had it set in his mind. It is his 
"Dream Waltz," and other fiddlers who learned it from him 
call it "Emerson's Dream." The tune "Wild Horse" he heard 
and liked at a show. He didn't know what it was but later 
another fiddlin' friend heard him playing it and told him 
it was called "Wild Horse." He has called it that ever since. 
There was an old fiddler by the name of Louie Reak who 
claimed that he himself had "made up" a tune that he played. 
You will find it under the name "Louie Reak." But I must 
drop the stories and get on with my lists. 



WE TALK IT OVER 35 

Smokey Minson's favorites are : 

a. Ragged Annie, Hoe Down, Soldier Joy, 8th Day 
of January, Arkansas Traveler, Turkey in the 
Straw, New Money, Texas Break Down, Lop- 
eared Mule, and Waggoner. 

b. Love Nobody, The Girl I Left Behind Me, Haste to 
the Wedding, Buffalo Girls, Old Joe Clark, Do 
Rang Hornpipe, D and G Rag, Woe Mule, Irish 
Wash Woman, and Dill Pickle Rag. 

Nick Nicholas favorites are : 

a. Turkey in the Straw, Irish Washer Woman, Soap 
Suds Over the Fence, Sugar in the Gourd, Arkan- 
saw Traveler, Soldier's Joy, Chicken Reel, The 
Girl I Left Behind Me, Buffalo Girls, and Devil's 
Dream. 

b. Little Brown Jug, 8th of January, Ragged Annie, 
New Money, Texas Breakdown, Waggoner, Dill 
Pickle Rag, Haste to the Wedding, and D and G 
Rag. 

c. Lop-eared Mule, Durang Horn Pipe, Leather 
Breeches, Sally Goodyn and Old Susanna, 

Dad Ead's favorite tunes : 

a. Flat Wood Square Dance, Never Saw the Like 
Since Getting Upstairs, Long-eared Mule, Leather 
Britches, Durang Hornpipe own arrangement, 
Tennessee Wagoner and Missouri Wagoner, Vir 
ginia Reel, Eads Two Step, Dick Reavis D Cord 
Reel, Arkansas Traveler. 

b. Smokey Mountain Buffalo Gals, Sallie Goodin, 
Irish Washwoman, Eads Country Dance Reel, Old 
Dick Reavis G Cord, Brushy Branch, Texas 
Breakdown, Laplace March, March Italia, Life on 
Ocean Waves. 

c. Fisher's Hornpipe, Sailor's Hornpipe, Devil's 
Dream, Just an Old Time Waltz With You, Over 
the Waves Waltz, Paddie Won't you Drink Some, 
Haste to the Wedding, Salt Lake City Two-Step, 
Missippi Sawyer, Husking Bee, Gullie Hoppers 
Dance. 



36 COWBOY DANCES 

For a small group of beginners who are just learning the 
idea of the dance, a piano is quite sufficient. But if the 
group begins to get good, they will want authentic music, 
which means that a good old-time fiddler must be found, and 
it is surprising how a little inquiry will usually discover one 
in any community. Most carefully schooled violinists simply 
cannot produce the authentic flavor. "Fiddlers" have mas 
tered a proud craft all their own. They consider it a dis 
grace to be a "note-reader." They have learned to fiddle by 
ear from some other old-time fiddler. And they usually 
learned to fiddle when they were little boys. 

What they lack in concert technique, they more than 
make up in dexterity and endurance and inviolable rhythm. 
They usually tuck their fiddle under their chins in the 
standard fashion, but they hold it at any bizarre angle that 
suits their individual fancy. One of the best fiddlers I know 
never tucks his instrument under his chin, but holds it in 
the crook of his elbow, lying out along his forearm, curling 
his long fingers up around the strings with amazing dex 
terity, and swinging his bow in long sweeps back and forth 
in front of his waist. Another fine fiddler I know, because 
of an accident, had to give up the standard position for 
awhile, and perfected a style in which he holds his fiddle 
propped up vertically on his knee, strings away from his 
body like a tiny cello, and ready for a nice long comfortable 
sweep of his bow arm. He found this position so good that 
he never changed back again. 

When you have found your old fiddler, he will usually 
have to furnish his own pianist. For since he is not a "note 
reader," a regular pianist, with printed music before her, 
worries him till he cannot play. He usually knows a "woman" 
who can either play chords to his music or who can elaborate 
those chords into a full and figured melody. But they must 
be teamed and used to each other or the fiddler cannot play 
at all. With these two old-time musicians it is customary to 
have a "strummer" who beats out the rhythm with either 
a guitar or a banjo. Sometimes drums are added to these 
three. Or a big base fiddle, plucked, not bowed, gives worlds 
of good rhythm. In fact, one of these good big-toned "bull 
fiddles," and an accordion, to accompany your old-time 
fiddler, makes a combination that is hard to beat. 

A modern jazz orchestra with its saxophones and clari 
nets, somehow cannot supply authentic flavor. If a real 



WE TALK IT OVER 37 

old-time orchestra cannot be found it is almost best to limit 
oneself to a good pianist, who is in sympathy with the old 
jigs and reels and willing to try for the real old-time flavor. 

There are many old-time books of, music. Perhaps as 
good as any for the pianist to begin with is the Pioneer 
Collection of Old Time Dances, published by the Paull- 
Pioneer Music Corporation. But she must remember that 
one simple old tune of eight or sixteen bars will have to be 
repeated through all the seven or eight minutes it takes to 
dance a square, with whatever variation that she can invent. 
Or if she must, she can modulate into another tune now and 
then in the middle of a dance. 

But not so with the old-time musicians. When I call a 
dance, most of my fiddlers ask me to let them know each 
"call" just before I call it, because they want to be pre 
pared to give that call the old tune which their experience 
has taught them is best for it. And they hold that tune 
through to the bitter end of the call. For the special old- 
time round dances, or couple dances, such as the varsouvi- 
anna, the schottische, and the polka, there is, of course, 
special music. 

But we have gone a long way from our dinner party 
and their discussion of the origins of the Western square. 
By now they will be wanting to know just how a Western 
dance is done. If they get really interested, it may be 
necessary to place cubes of sugar on the table in a sample 
square and maneuver them around through some sweet 
little dance. But a real discussion of the figure and steps of 
the dance had better wait until the first real dance, when we 
can get a set of dancers out on the floor to demonstrate it 
all for them. 



Chapter 2 

r 



The 
First 
Dance 



WHEN a group of beginners are brought together for 
their first dance, doubts and embarrassments and 
reluctance are apt to be manifest. For this reason it is best 
to have no audience present to add to this embarrassment. 
There is always a group of the curious who like to sit on the 
side lines and watch others pioneer and who say that per 
haps they will try it later. It is hard enough to go through 
what the psychologist calls the period of "initial diffuse 
movements" (and what the beginner calls "making a fool 
of himself") in learning a new set of reactions without 
having the curious smiles of the onlookers make the initial 
movements even more diffuse. So, for the best success, only 
those who are willing to try the dances themselves, should 
be invited to the party. 

If one full set of experienced dancers can be present they 
will prove invaluable. They can first demonstrate the dance 
to be learned (and we learn most quickly by imitating what 
we have seen) , and then the demonstrator set can split up 
and one of its experienced couples can take its place as the 
first or head couple of each set of beginners and lead them 
through the figure with a great economy of time. 

The Caller 

The success of the first dance will depend upon the effec 
tiveness of the "caller." The hostess, or the chairman, may 
make all arrangements and get the dancers and accoutre 
ments together, but it is the "caller" who will have to put 
the dance over. Once started, the dance is in his hands. A 
committee of explainers and directors only outbabbles the 
tower of Babel itself. The caller must give all the com- 



THE FIRST DANCE 39 

mands, all the explanations, all the directions. Of course, 
having explained a movement and asked the dancers to try 
it in a "time out'' period, then and only then can the leading 
couples, and all the experienced dancers present, help and 
explain personally to all who do not know. 

At first blush, it would seem that a professional caller 
would be necessary. But I have found that many experienced 
callers are at a loss in teaching beginners. They are expert 
at calling for experienced dancers. But they are not natural 
teachers and are at a complete loss to make things clear to 
beginners. Then, too, they have often developed a nasal 
twang, or a lightning patter; they are extremely picturesque 
and colorful and interesting and are perfectly intelligible to 
experienced dancers who are used to them, but completely 
unintelligible to a beginner. An experienced dancer, who not 
only knows the caller but also the call itself, can make a 
change on the slightest variation of intonation or inflection. 
But to a beginner it is only "gibberish" it is "jaberwocky" ; 
and he is completely confused while the professional caller 
considers him unbelievably stupid. He thinks he told him 
what to do and that only a fool would fail to do it. But if the 
beginner cannot understand him he has told him nothing. 

A good amateur caller then should first have the voice^ 
loud, clear, and distinct. He should have done enough public 
speaking to enunciate distinctly and to be able to throw his 
voice so that it will cut through the stamping and laughing 
and chatter of the dance hall as sharply as a knife. For if he 
is not heard he might just as well be absent. 

At times he may prefer to sing his call and this is very 
effective. But he must remember that singing is never as 
clear, as easily understood, as the spoken word, and his first 
duty is to be understood. Thus he usually compromises by us 
ing a sort of singing chant, speaking his words distinctly but 
pitching them on a musical tone and giving them a chanting 
or singing quality. This note or tone must be in key with 
his orchestra, that is it must be on one of the elements of the 
chord of the key in which the orchestra is playing. His voice 
then, like the "bull fiddle," is simply chording with the or 
chestra. The simplest chord, of course, is made up of three 
tones, the tonic, the dominant, and the third. He will find 
that he usually pitches his voice instinctively on the domi 
nant, though he will often shift back and forth to the other 



40 COWBOY DANCES 

two notes. He must not be self-conscious about the special 
note or its technical name, but he must make sure that the 
note he uses is in harmony with his orchestra at all times. 

He, of course, must be thoroughly familiar with the calls 
before the dance begins. If it is all new to him it means not 
only preliminary study, but he will probably have to get a 
few friends together beforehand and move them around 
and work it all out until everything is perfectly clear to him 
and practiced enough to be running smoothly. Our caller 
must have an infallible sense of rhythm, not only of the 
fiddle, but instinctively timing his phrases with the four- or 
eight-bar units that the music itself is built on. This must 
be instinctive, for with different groups on the floor, some 
fast and some slow, he never calls his dance twice alike. 
If he ever fails in the rhythm of his phrasing, the dancers 
find the dance no fun at all, even though they may not be 
able to analyze the source of the trouble. 

This means that the caller often has to start his call 
phrase on the weak part of a musical phrase. If both his call 
and the musical phrase are built to the count of eight, it 
would be theoretically best for them to start together on the 
count of "one." But if the dancers get behind, the "one" of 
the call may have to fall on the "five" of the music, starting 
this on the second half of the musical phrase. Take, for 
example, the call "Two gents swing with the elbow swing" 
on page 172 and count it out on the four fingers of your left 
hand. You will find you have counted through your four 
fingers exactly four times. But now put a set of dancers 
before you and try it, and you will find they simply can't 
keep up with that mechanical perfection of four sets of four 
counts. They have too far to go around each other, too much 
floor to cover. Now you will have to introduce waits (two 
counts each time, since one beat of wait would throw the 
next phrase out of step) . Perhaps it would count something 
like this : 

Two gents swing with the elbow swing 

(Wait, wait) 

Opposite partners elbows swing 

Now two gents with the same old thing 

(Wait, wait) 

Now your partners elbows swing. 

Our caller must also possess an unerring geometric 



THE FIRST DANCE 41 

sense, that is a spatial sense of moving and interrelated pat 
tern. We all recognize the presence or absence of a color 
sense or a sense of smell or a sense of taste. We would not 
expect a person without an "ear" or a sense of tone to par 
ticipate in group singing, or a "color blind" person to exe 
cute a painting. And yet I am convinced that though psy 
chologists have never recognized it, there are as many people 
who lack a "spatial," a "geometric" sense as there are those 
who lack a sense of color or of tone. And we find that they 
are never able to learn how to square dance. In spite of an 
otherwise high order of intelligence and in spite of endless 
instruction, the pattern means nothing to them and they are 
forever running off in the wrong direction. It goes without 
saying that an infallible spatial or geometric sense is essen 
tial to any good caller. 

Then he should be a natural teacher, which so many of 
the old professional callers, alas, are not. By natural teacher, 
I mean, he must not only be able to make his ideas perfectly 
clear, but if the beginner does not understand one way he 
must be able to explain in another and another until it all 
comes clear. This means that he must not only be able to 
analyze every detail of the dance, but he must be able 
instantly to analyze the difficulty that stands in the way of 
the beginner. 

Not only is this clear-headedness essential in teaching the 
dance, but it is very necessary in the midst of the calling. 
He will see the whole pattern weaving itself out before him 
on the floor. Here a set of more experienced dancers may 
be running ahead of his call. There an especially slow set is 
falling farther and farther behind. He must keep them to 
gether. He must put more command in his voice, and make 
the fast ones wait and the slow ones catch up. (In extreme 
cases he has to stop the dance and beg the fast ones to wait 
for the call, and the slow ones to follow the call even if they 
have to leave out a section in which they have bogged down. 
Everyone must follow the call on the instant or it will be 
bedlam.) Ten or twenty sets on a floor all moving exactly 
to the call is a sight to be remembered. 

Always there will be distractions. Someone always 
wants to talk to the caller in the very middle of his call. 
And even though he does not listen he is severely distracted. 
Fast sets, slow sets, new arrivals, little accidents, all tend to 
distract him. But he must keep his eye on that unfolding 



42 COWBOY DANCES 

pattern, and carry it on, and keep his place exactly timed in 
every call. 

It is not an easy job. I have seen experts who regularly 
got their calls out of order, or left one couple completely 
out. And I have seen many experienced callers who could 
not keep two sets together in a dance. It is a special trick 
and not nearly as easy as it looks. 

Yet there is always some simple-minded, rather loud 
mouthed individual who keeps asking to be allowed to do 
the calling simply because he enjoys his own noise and loves 
to be at the center of things. Experienced dancers may carry 
on in spite of him. But beginners will fall in confusion be 
fore him, their enthusiasms all laid low. 

The quick, intelligent, capable caller that I have de 
scribed will find one more river yet to cross, and that is his 
own first embarrassment and his finest qualities only make 
this river seem wider. He will feel everyone look at him 
most peculiarly on his least faltering or his tiniest mistake. 
But he must carry on clearly and smoothly and forcefully, 
in spite of the embarrassment. It comes mostly from the 
newness of his job. All good callers have had to swim this 
river. He may be tempted to carry cards in his hands to 
read from, but they are apt to make it worse. He had better 
put it all in his memory, and then plunge in. Soon he will 
find it going smoothly, and he will know the delight of con 
trolling a great unfolding pattern of human beings through 
the contagious beauty of a dance. 

But, it will be asked, does not the fiddler do the calling? 
No, not very often in a Western dance. I know many fiddlers 
who are also good callers, but they never do both jobs at 
once. "Calling is hard enough/' they tell me, "without hav 
ing to keep the fiddle going too." In the old New England 
Quadrilles, where the dances are more symmetrical, the 
calls very much shorter, and the changes always occurring 
on a change of the music, which is the particular music for 
that particular dance, the fiddler can and often does do the 
calling. But in the Western dance it is very rare indeed. 

Circle Two-Step 

If the party is large it often pays to start with an "ice 
breaker," such as the Circle Two-Step. This gets them all 
used to laughing and trying together, mixes them up thor- 



THE FIRST DANCE 43 

oughly and breaks down all barriers and stiffness, and gives 
them all a chance to become familiar with a few fundamental 
elements of the old dances. 

Have all the dancers stand holding hands in a great 
circle around the hall and all facing the center of the room. 
Men and women must alternate. Two or three extra women 
or a few extra men together in the circle will spoil the dance. 
The caller must see to it that they are evenly and alternately 
distributed. 

He must then explain that the woman on each man's 
right is his partner, that each will constantly get new part 
ners in this dance, but always the woman to the right is the 
man's partner. It is well to explain further that in all old- 
time dancing not only is the woman on the right the man's 
partner, but he must get the habit of always putting his 
partner on his right when he takes a position in the circle 
or in a square or when he promenades the hall. As soon as 
each man learns always to put his partner on his right side 
much of the confusion of learning is eliminated. 

Now the caller briefly explains the few directions or 
"calls" that he will use during the dance, and has the group 
walk through them slowly before the music begins. 

Circle right Still holding hands, each dancer turns to 
the right and walks with a light gliding step around the 
circle in that direction until the call is changed. 

Circle left Each dancer, turning to the left and still 
holding hands, walks with the circle in the opposite direc 
tion, or to the left. The caller must explain that he will 
never call these circles in the same order and that they must 
get used to listening for the "call" and following the "call" 
on the instant, whatever it is. 

Forward and back The whole circle, holding hands, 
walks forward, beginning with the right foot, four steps 
toward the center, closing in the circle, and then walks four 
steps back. 

Grand right and left Each man, turning to the right, 
faces his partner and takes her right hand (she having 
turned to her left and faced him) . Partners walk past each 
other holding right hands for a moment and then releasing 
them so that the man can take the next lady in the circle by 
the left hand, while the lady takes the next man by the left, 
and in this fashion they keep, marching, each taking each 
new person they meet alternately with the right and then 



44 COWBOY DANCES 

with the left hands. The men find themselves marching 
around the circle to the right, or counterclockwise, in a sort 
of serpentine through the oncoming line of ladies, taking the 
first by the right hand, the next by the left, and so on alter 
nately until the call is changed. The ladies, in the meantime, 
are marching to the left, or clockwise, around the circle, 
passing to the right and then to the left of the individuals in 
the oncoming column of men. 

(Note: This, of course, is only half of the regular call. 
But I have found it simpler to start beginners this way, and 
not to mention the "allemande left" with which this figure 
always begins until they have become thoroughly familiar 
with the simple right and left.) 

Dance that pretty gal around or simply Everybody dance 
Each man chooses the nearest girl to him, the one whose 
hand he has just reached, and swings her into an old- 
fashioned two-step, anywhere around the floor. Quite often 
the two lines are moving unevenly, and there will be a 
concentration or surplus of girls in one place, while in an 
other part of the circle there will be a surplus of men left 
without partners. It must be explained that each man must 
run across the circle as quickly as possible and choose the 
first unengaged girl he meets as his partner. It often helps 
for some man who is dancing by her to call out Here's an 
empty so as to make it easier for the lone men to find these 
stray women, and incidentally this always puts more laugh 
ter into the party. 

Form a grand circle, put your lady down on your right 
All the dancers fall back to the wall and take hands again in 
a great circle. (Only for the first few times will it be neces 
sary to call Put your lady doivn on your right. As soon as 
it becomes instinctive to put the lady on the right, we call 
only Form a grand circle. But until that time it is well to 
add this phrase and avoid the confusion that otherwise 
entails,) 

Having explained the calls it is well to try it just once 
with the music, using the calls in the order in which they 
are given above. If the dancers get in trouble, it is necessary 
to stop and explain their difficulties. But usually they catch 
right on and you can go ahead. 

As soon as the dancers are going nicely the call should 
be varied in order to get them used to following the call. The 
Circle right, Circle left, and Fonvard and back should never 



THE FIRST DANCE 45 

be given twice in the same order. But, of course, once the 
Grand right and left has been called, it must be followed by 
Dance that pretty gal around, and after a period of general 
dancing must be followed by Form your grand circle. 

After the dancers have gone through the whole dance 
several times it may be necessary to advise them about the 
shuffling gliding step that is used, and about the carriage of 
the upper body. 



The Steps 

The Circle Two-Step offers a good chance to practice the 
steps that are used in all square dancing. And though some 
of the variants are seldom used in this circle dance, it may be 
best to discuss them all at this time. 

The step most frequently used is a light, gliding, shuffling 
walk with a promenade rhythm. The knees are loose, the 
step is light and somewhat shuffling an^ in complete swing 
with the music. The best dancers hold themselves quite 
erect or stiff from the waist up, shoulders back and elbows 
high, wide, and handsome, the dip and sway of the body 
being mostly produced from the loose-jointed hips and knees. 
There is a grace and beauty and swing to a good dancer that 
is very catching. 

Some dancers take a little leap or jump on each step, 
springing up and down quite joyously. This is usually the 
mark of a beginner. The old-timers are always so smooth 
that if you saw them dancing beyond a low wall, you would 
think they were whirling and spinning and moving on cas 
ters or wheels, such is the action of the upper body. Watch 
ing their feet, however, one is fascinated with the flash 
and speed and loose-jointed abandon. Nearly all of them 
put in frequent "breaks 77 or "two-steps." (The same step 
that is used in marching to get in step with the platoon.) In 
step and out of step they continually interpolate this little 
"break." Now and then they "stamp" to accent the rhythm. 
And the best dancers throw in a little jig or "hoe-down" 
without ever missing their step, just a flashing little flourish 
to add fun and beauty to the figure. 

Once in a while, though very rarely, and always for some 
special call, the whole set may do a "hippety-hop," or skip 
ping step. But this is very exhausting and is seldom seen. 



46 COWBOY DANCES 

It is best to discourage it in the Circle Two-Step, though 
some beginners instinctively try to do it. 

I once saw a very fine group of dancers in a state con 
test use a slow "cakewalk" step, with arms folded high on 
the chest, head well back, and knees lifted very high on each 
step. It was effective, but all the old-timers around me 
insisted that it was not the real thing, that nobody ever 
danced like that in the good old days. I suspect, though, that 
even in the good old days special groups did whatever they 
pleased if it added fun to the dance, even as they still do 
today. 

The most effective, the most fun, and the most fascinat 
ing step to watch is the good old gliding, shuffling, rhythmi 
cal walk, perfected until it has an uncouth grace all of its 
own. 

When they choose their partners in the Grand Right and 
Left and dance freely over the floor they should use the old- 
fashioned two-step. This will prove a difficulty to some of 
them. Of course, th easiest solution is to let them one-step. 
But it creates more fun and gives the satisfaction of start 
ing with a good old-time dance step if the two-step is more 
or less mastered. They came for an old-fashioned dance, 
and they are usually laughingly jubilant over their jerky 
two-step, no matter how badly they do it. 

The Two-Step 

The two-step is essentially a step-together-step or step- 
close-step, starting alternately to one side and then the other. 
Or it is analyzed more completely as follows, in which the 
directions are given for the man, the woman of course, 
using the opposite foot and the opposite direction from the 
man. 

On the first beat of the music let the man slide his left 
foot out to the left, and before the second beat let him close 
his right foot to his left. Then on the second beat let him 
step backward in a short step with his left foot. On the 
first beat of the second bar of the music let him slide his 
right foot to the right and quickly close his left foot to his 
right, and on the second beat take a short step forward with 
his right foot. 

If he repeats this through several bars of music, for 
practice, he will find that he is remaining almost in one spot, 



THE FIRST DANCE 47 

doing a sort of flattened square. But this will give him his 
rhythm and his steps most quickly, and when it is mastered 
he can step forward or back as he wishes and progress in 
any direction he may choose. To go forward, for instance, 
he will slide with his left, close together with his right, and 
take a short step forward with his left then on the next 
bar of music slide with his right, close together with his left 
and take a short step forward with his right. He will repeat 
this series as long as he wishes to continue forward. 

Since on the first beat there is the "slide" and the "close" 
and on the second beat of the music only the "step," some 
beginners find it easier to count the music "one-and-two- 
and," "one-and-two-and," etc. In this case they "slide" on 
the "one," "close" on the "and," and "step" on the "two," 
holding through the final "and." 

The real two-step should be smooth and beautiful to 
watch. But in a Western dance it is quite in kind to make it 
joyous and bouncy. In fact, the man will find that if he 
spins continuously to the right while he dances (that is, 
in the "right face" direction), it is good fun to lift the lady 
off the floor as he "slides" (or just before he "slides") with 
his right foot. As he leads with his left he does a regular 
two-step, but always as he leads with his right he lifts his 
partner as high as he dares without spoiling her rhythm or 
her step, for she must come down exactly on the beat. And 
the faster the spin, the greater the centrifugal force, and the 
easier the lift. The ladies, bless 'em, seem to like it. 

In fact if a group does not care to master a smooth two- 
step, it is wise for the caller to ask for a Hippety-hop and 
they will all falHnto something sufficiently like the two-step 
to serve the purpose. And they will think they are having 
a very good time. 

Allemande Left 

After the dancers have the simple version given above 
so smoothly that the Grand right and left (where the trouble 
usually occurs) is faultless every time, the men all imme 
diately starting to the right, or counterclockwise, and the 
ladies all going to the left, or clockwise, it is necessary for 
the caller to explain to them that a Grand right and left is 
almost universally preceded by a little introductory turn 
called Allemande left. 



JJK n }>'< - 

^K 't "'^',1.1 




1. Allemande (After a preliminary swing each couple breaks holds.) 




2. left (Each gentleman advances to his corner lady) 

ALLEMANDE LEFT 




3. with your (takes her by the left hand) 




4. left hand (and completely encircles her) 

ALLEMANDE LEFT 



50 COWBOY DANCES 

If they are a group who are interested in terminology 
and origins, he may want to discuss this familiar old word of 
the Western dance caller. It has been suggested that it 
comes from the French phrase "a-la-main" or "on-the~ 
hand" and that "allemande left" is simply a corruption of 
"on-the-left-hand." But though it sounds reasonable enough, 
I doubt if there is a drop of French blood in the word. Nor 
do I think it is a corrupted form of the Swiss "allewander," 
their term for a "right and left" derived from the root 
"to wind." The spelling clearly indicates German. And we 
find that there was a famous old dance called the "Alle 
mande" or "German," which was full of turns, the gentle 
man forever taking the lady's hand and turning around her. 
And I believe that "allemande left" simply means do a left 
turn around your lady as they used to do in the old "alle 
mande." 

If your dancers are enjoying your explanatory talk while 
they catch their breath, it may interest some of them to know 
that the "right and left" which is part of this figure is a 
very ancient step indeed. Three or four hundred years ago 
it was known through Europe as the chame anglaise, or the 
English chain. And even earlier in England it was called 
the "Hey" the "shepherds' hey" that the earliest poets 
wrote about. This same interweaving chain survives in the 
"Grand right and left" of a Western cow camp. Shepherds' 
hey! 

The caller will explain that the complete call is usually 
given in some such form as: 

Allemande left with your left hand, 

Then right hand to partner and right and left grand, 

but that until they get more used to the call and the idea 
he will use a simpler form which goes : 

Swing your left hand lady with your left hand, 
Then right hand to partner and right and left grand. 

In this maneuver of the allemande each gentleman faces 
left, instead of turning right to face his partner, and each 
lady faces right, so that the gentlemen stand facing their 
left-hand ladies. They take left hands and walk once around 
each other and back to their own positions. This leaves 
them now facing their partners, whom they take with their 
right hands and inarch past them in the old familiar Grand 




5. Right hand to partner (He now gives his partner) 




6. and right (his right hand and passes on beyond her.) 

GRAND BIGHT AND LEFT 




7. and left (He gives the next oncoming lady his left hand, passes her) 




8. grand! (Gives his right to the next lady, and so on alternately 
passing each with a left or a right) 

GRAND RIGHT AND LEFT 



THE FIRST DANCE 53 

right and left in the same direction and same manner as 
they first learned it. It is nothing but the right and left 
preceded by a little left hook, or complete turn, around the 
left-hand lady, holding her left hand as you circle each 
other. 

It is so simple that it may seem labored to teach it in 
two parts in this way. But I have found, especially with a 
large crowd, that it saves a lot of confusion and innumer 
able collisions. Starting with the simple Grand right and 
left gets their directions established and the men get in 
the habit of always going right and the ladies always going 
left with a serpentine, touching alternate hands. Once this 
is established it is easy to add the preliminary left hook of 
the Allemande, and the trick is done. But try to teach the 
two maneuvers at the same time to a large crowd and you 
will have them all running off wildly in all directions, and 
the stampede will be hard to check. 

When you start dancing again, after the explanation, it 
will be well for the first three or four times through the 
dance always to use the simpler call Siving the left hand 
lady with your left hand. It helps them get started. Once 
they are used to the figure, start calling Allemande left with 
your left hand, and use this more standard form always 
thereafter. 

The Circle Two-Step is simple to learn and fun to do, 
and when you finally stop them (by simply having the music 
stop in one of the periods of the two-step) they will prob 
ably shout and clap and call for more. To keep their interest 
up you can then give them some other simple and popular 
variations. 

Variations 

After the two-step, instead of calling form a grand circle 
you may call : 

Form a double circle 
Ladies on the inside, 
Gents on the out! 
Ladies on the inside, 
Pretty side out! 

In this case there will be an outer circle of men only, 
holding each other by the hands and facing inward in the 



54 COWBOY DANCES 

regular fashion. Inside them there will be an inner ring of 
only women, facing toward the men (pretty side out) and 
holding each other by the hands in a circle. When the two 
rings have formed, call : 

Everybody circle right. Since the two rings are facing 
each other it makes each go opposite the other or past each 
other. When they have passed far enough to assure a new 
partner for everyone, call: Everybody pick the prettiest 
gal and dance and they are off on the two-step again. 

Since the two circles must always go in opposite direc 
tions a new caller often calls Ladies go right and gents go 
left hoping to make them do so. But since the two rings are 
facing each other this means that they will then both go in 
the same direction or in a sort of double column. So, in 
order to send them past each other, be simple and call either 
Everybody circle right or Everybody circle left, and that 
will send the two rings past each other. 

Once they are familiar with this variation the caller can 
call either figure after the two-step and arrange all the 
parts in any way to suit his fancy. 

Another pleasant variation after the two-step is to call 
Promenade now two by two. They should march side by 
side, lady on the right and holding both hands crossed over 
in front like a pair of skaters. And as soon as they are 
promenading smoothly (to the right, of course, or counter 
clockwise), you can call Gents go forward and the ladies 
turn back (or The ladies go forward and the gents turn 
back, as your fancy dictates, and never twice alike) . When 
they are well mixed you again call Everybody choose the 
prettiest gal and dance. 

This variation is very helpful when the crowd is large 
and the hall is small, for then the Grand circle can hardly fit 
around the room without loops and scallops in the circle, 
and the allemande is very difficult to do with such crowding. 
When they Promenade two by two it makes the circumfer 
ence of the circle just half as large and simplifies every 
thing, in addition to being good fun. 

A third variation can be enjoyed by calling Promenade 
four by four when two couples march four abreast with 
arms hooked in elbows. This often causes a little confusion 
by some couple being left stranded without another couple 
to fill out their four. But if they look around the circle they 
can usually find another single couple who are also stranded, 



THE FIRST DANCE 55 

and they can run across the circle and join with them to 
complete their four. When they are well arranged and 
marching- smoothly four by four, you can call Keep your 
four columns moving while the gents go fonvard and the 
ladies turn back. This gets them milling even more amus 
ingly until you call Pick the prettiest gal and dance. 

Summary 

To start the dance the caller often needs only to have the 
orchestra start a two-step and when they are all out on the 
floor dancing he can call Form a grand circle and go- on with 
the dance. 

A typical form for the whole call might be something 
like this: 

Circle Two-Step 

Form your grand circle; 
Circle left (or Circle right) 
Forward and back. 
Now allemande left as you come down, 
Grand right and left and so on around, 
Right foot up and left foot down, 
Make that big foot jar the ground, 
Now dance that pretty gal around. 

S 

Form a grand circle 

And so on as long as desired, introducing whatever 
variation he wishes after the two-step period and stopping 
the dance by stopping the music during a two-step. 



Chapter 3 
f 



. 



A 

Simple 
Square 



THE Circle Two-Step is so easy that your crowd will feel 
very confident and pleased with themselves as soon as 
they have done it a few times through. Now, laughing and 
friendly, with all their inhibitions stilled, they are ready for 
their first square dance. 

While they are catching their breath from the Circle 
Two-Step is a good time to get them seated and give them a 
preliminary discussion on the theory of the square. It will 
help a good deal to put a set of dancers out on the floor in 
order to make your explanations clearer. If you have a 
demonstration set of experienced dancers it will make your 




DIAGRAM OF A TYPICAL SQUARE DISTINGUISHING THE FOUR LADIES IN 
RELATION TO THE FIRST GENTLEMAN. 



A SIMPLE SQUARE 57 

task even easier. But lacking them, you can put any four 
couples out on the floor and make things clear enough by 
moving them around. 

The Positions 

A set of dancers or a square is composed of four couples, 
each standing on one of the sides of an imaginary square, or 
towards one of the four walls of the room and each couple 
facing the center of the square (or the opposite couple). 
Where space is crowded this imaginary square need be only 
eight or ten feet across. But it is better, especially with 
beginners, to allow ten or twelve feet across for each square. 

In each square and throughout the dance the lady's posi 
tion is always to the right side of her partner. If this rule 
of always putting the lady on the right is carefully followed 
much confusion in learning can be avoided. In fact, the 
position of the lady gives her the name by which she is 
designated in the call. For each man the lady on his right 
is his "partner," the lady on his left is his "corner," the lady 
across from him is his "opposite," and the lady to the right 
beyond his partner is the "right hand lady/' though she 
seldom figures in the calls. For each lady, likewise, the man 
on her left is her "partner," the man on her right is her 
"corner," the man across from her is her "opposite," and 
the man on the left next beyond her partner is the "left 
hand gent." 

Each couple is numbered according to the side of the 
square on which they are standing, and they always return 
to this same or "home" position after each promenade or 
special maneuver. The couple standing nearest to and with 
their backs to the head of the hall is called "first couple." The 
couple to their right is called "second couple," the couple 
opposite them is "third couple," and the couple standing 
on their left is called the "fourth couple." The head 
of the hall is usually that end of the hall nearest the or 
chestra. If the orchestra is located in the middle of one of 
the sides, the caller should announce before the first dance 
begins which end of the hall is considered the "head." Since 
the "first couple" stands nearest the head of the hall they 
are sometimes called "head couple." And, of course, the 
"third couple" is called "foot couple." In this case the 
"second and fourth couples" are called "the sides," without 
differentiation between them. 



58 COWBOY DANCES 

Throughout any simple dance each couple is known as 
"first/' "second," "third/' etc., by the position they occupy 
at the beginning of the dance. And throughout this par 
ticular dance they always return to this same home position. 
For the second dance of the evening, however, they may each 
shift into a new set or square and take any position they 
happen to find open, keeping this position throughout any 
one dance. In a real old-fashioned square dance, where 
most of the evening is given to these old figures it is cus 
tomary to call the sets out on the floor and to call two 
dances one after the other. These two separate dances are 
called the first and second "tip" of the set. And when the 
first dance is finished everyone remains standing in his 
position on the floor, laughing and visiting until the music 
starts again, and then the set dances the second "tip," re 
taining through it their same positions or numbers. 

The Introduction 

It must be explained that a square dance usually opens 
with one of several possible introductory figures. The fol 
lowing is perhaps the commonest form : 

Honors right and honors left Each man bows first to 
the lady on his right, that is, his partner, and then to the 
lady on his left. The ladies all return the bow, which is 
executed quite quickly. 

All join hands and circle to the left The whole square 
with joined hands moves in a large circle to the left, walking 
around in a clockwise direction. They usually get more than 
halfway around when the next call comes. 

Break and swing and promenade back At the word 
"break," hands are dropped all around, and each man takes 
his partner in a modified dance position, her right hand 
extended in his left, her left hand on his shoulder, and his 
right arm around her waist. Where this differs from the 
standard dance position is that instead of standing face to 
face, the couples often stand right hip touching right hip, the 
man's right arm having to pass across the front of his lady 
and his wrist around her waist. The lady, with her hip 
braced against her partner, throws her shoulders back away 
from him in order to take advantage of the centrifugal force 
of the swing. With short steps the couple swings completely 
around twice in a "right about face" or clockwise direction. 




1. Honors right! 




2. Honors left! 

AN INTRODUCTION 




3. All join hands and circle to the left. 




4. Break and swing! 

AN INTRODUCTION 




5. And promenade 




6. Home. 

AN INTRODUCTION 



62 COWBOY DANCES 

Figure after figure in square dancing calls for this 
"swing" which is always done as above, and must be under 
stood and mastered, if so easy a maneuver can be said to be 
"mastered/ 5 before one goes on with the dance. It is usually 
customary to make two complete revolutions when the 
"swing" is called for, but in some dizzy figures one revolu 
tion will be quite enough. 

As soon as they have "swung," each couple promenades 
back "home," or back to the position they were originally 
standing in. They march two-by-two ; that is, side by side, 
with the lady on the right side of the gentleman, and holding 
hands with the arms crossed in front of them as in the 
customary pair skating position ; that is, the man holds the 
lady's left hand in his left hand and her right hand in his 
right with his right arm across above or in front of her 
left. (In skating it is usually crossed under the lady's the 
better to support her, but in dancing it is always crossed 
above.) 

The promenade is always to the right, or counterclock 
wise. It occurs again and again throughout the figure of the 
dance, and the right-hand direction must become a habit. 

Other introductory figures are used, but we can teach 
them with later dances. This Honors right and honors left 
is by far the commonest and is, therefore, the best to begin 
with. 

After executing it the couples are back just where they 
started from, all facing the center as at the beginning, and 
ready for the dance proper to begin. 

One of the easiest dances to start beginners with I have 
found to be : 

Form a Star with the Right Hand Cross 

This is in typical square formation with first couple 
visiting around to each of the others in turn, beginning with 
the second couple, going on to the third, and finishing with 
the fourth. Then the second couple visits around the square 
repeating the same figure in turn with each of the others, 
the third, the fourth, and lastly the first couple. Then the 
third and fourth couples each visit around the square in the 
same manner. While the first and second couples are doing 
the figure, the third and fourth couples merely stand and 
await their turn. In this type of square there are always 



A SIMPLE SQUARE 63 

two couples in action and two couples awaiting their turns. 
Of course, with experts the two odd couples may get in 
action too, just to make it more fun, but they have to scamper 
to be back in position in time to receive the visiting couple. 
And it is unwise for beginners to try this. 

The simple figure used around the square in this dance 
is called: 

First couple out to the couple on the right, 
Form a star with the right hand cross. 
Back with the left and don't get lost. 
Sluing your opposite with your right, 
Noiv your partner with your left, 
And on to the next. 

The first couple simply walks over and faces the second 
couple. All four dancers grasp right hands at about the 
level of their heads, thus forming a star, and holding hands 
they march around to the left, or in a clockwise direction, 
until the next phrase of the call is given. They then let go 
their holds and each swings in toward the others (a right- 
face turn) and they grasp all four left hands at their head 
level and circle back to the right or in a counterclockwise 
direction. 

On the last part of the call they let go each other's hands, 
and each man takes the opposite lady's right hand in his 
right and swings her completely around behind him. This 
brings them all into position so each man can then take his 
partner's left hand in his left and swing her around. 

The second couple swings back into position and stands 
as they were at the beginning, while the first couple swings 
around and faces the third couple, with whom they repeat 
the whole figure, as the call is repeated for them. 

The caller must be careful of his timing. It is best to 
allow just enough time in the Right hand cross for them all 
to take about four steps in this direction, then to reverse 
them with the Left hand cross, allowing time for only about 
four steps in this direction. Then let the opposites and the 
partners swing. In fact, it all times up with the music best 
if four or eight counts are allowed for each part of the 
figure. 

As soon as the first couple reaches the third couple the 
caller must repeat the call again, and then again for the 
fourth couple. At the conclusion of this figure instead of 



64 COWBOY DANCES 

calling On to the next, he usually says, Balance home and 
everybody siving. 

At most dances and in most sets this balance home simply 
means go home or back to position. But with the more ex 
perienced dancers they not only go home, but separating 
from each other in a half curtsy they come together for the 
swing. At the same time the three other couples in the set 
balance and swing, that is, face each other and each takes 
four steps backward and then four steps forward to his 
partner and then they swing. It makes a graceful and 
finished maneuver in the set. For the siving, of course, all 
four couples take the modified dance position and swing 
around twice in place. He then calls : 

Turn the left hand lady 
With your left hand 
Then right hand to partner 
And right and left grand. 

This is the same movement they learned in the Circle 
Two-Step. When they have all done the serpentine right and 
left and have again reached their partners he calls : 

Take your partner 
And promenade home. 

Or, which means the same thing, he may call : 

Promenade eight 
When you come straight. 

And each man taking the promenade position with his 
girl on his right walks counterclockwise around the square 
and back to his original place. 

Before going on with the dance and sending the second 
couple around the square with the same figure, it is usually 
found necessary for the caller to straighten out some of the 
sets who have got badly mixed up. And it is best to take 
time out until the beginners get their difficulty cleared up. 

In spite of the fact that they learned to do the Allemande 
left (or Swing the left-hand lady with your left hand) in the 
Circle Two-Step, they often have difficulty executing it in a 
square with only four couples. And I often find it helpful to 
walk them through this figure slowly without music until 
they get the idea fixed. Then too, some couples find it difficult 



A SIMPLE SQUARE 65 

to promenade back to their own positions, keeping their place 
in their square while they do so. Some couples, lacking a 
strong geometric sense, loiter or wander off into other 
squares or out around the hall or simply stand bewildered, 
while other couples "cut-the-pie" and get the square all 
mixed up. A few minutes taken to w r alk them slowly through 
the whole Allemande and Right and left to the Promenade is 
time well spent w r ith beginners. 

Another difficulty arises from the failure of the first 
gentleman to have his lady on his right when they present 
themselves to the third couple. If the lady is on the left side 
of him, it will put two ladies on one side of the Right hand 
star and two gentlemen on the other side. This will make 
the swinging of the opposites with the right hands very 
difficult and confused. The two ladies should be opposite 
each other and the two gentlemen opposite each other in the 
star. And this can be accomplished only if the lady is on her 
gentleman's right side as they approach the new couple. 

As soon as all the difficulties are straightened out the 
music can begin again and the dance continue, going on 
where you left off and, of course, not repeating the In 
troduction. The call continues: 

Second couple out 

To the couple on the right, 

Form a star with the right hand cross, etc. 

With an on to the next and an on to the next and then a bal 
ance and everybody swing the dance continues. Again they 
all do an Allemande left and a Grand right and left and a 
Promenade to places. 

Then it is all repeated for the third couple around, and 
after another Grand right and left it is again repeated for 
the fourth couple all the way around. After the final prome 
nade, the call is often given : 

Promenade, you know where. 
And I don't care. 
Take your honey 
To a nice soft chair. 

And that set is over. 

Since the call for the figure has to be repeated until it has 
been given twelve times, it is customary to alter it now and 



66 COWBOY DANCES 

then for the sake of variety. Instead of Form a star with 
the right hand cross you may call : 

Star by the right 
And how do you do? 
Back with the left 
And how are you? 

Or I have heard it called : 

Right hands crossed 
And hoiv do you do ? 
Back ivith the left 
And how are you? 

All of which means exactly the same thing, and only adds 
variety to the calling. Another very easy square to execute 
with beginners is : 



Forward Six and Fall Back Six 

The same introduction can be used as in the previous 
dance, or you can call: 

All jump up and never come down. 
Swing your honey around and around 
'Till the hollow of your foot 
Makes a hole in the ground. 
And promenade, boys, promenade! 

Which means only that each couple shall jump up into 
the air and then swing each other around and around until 
the call is finished and they are told to promenade, when 
with the regular promenade position they walk once around 
the square to the right, or counterclockwise, until they come 
back to their regular position, where they stand until the 
caller puts them in action. 

In the first part of the call proper it must be explained 
that as always in square dancing the instructions are for 
the men, the women having always to do the complementary 
or corresponding thing to the movement of the men. 

The call starts with : 



A SIMPLE SQUARE 67 

First couple out to the couple on the right (a) 

A?id circle four; 

Leave that girl, go on to the next (b) 

And circle three; 

Take that girl and go on to the next (c) 

And circle four; 

Leave that girl and go home alone. (d) 

Though it sounds a little complicated, it is very simple 
to execute, (a) The first couple moves over to the right and 
faces the second couple. All four join hands and circle to the 
left, or clockwise. As they come around to the full circle (b) 
the first man lets go with both hands and moves on alone to 
the third couple. This leaves his lady standing with the 
second couple, still holding the second man's left hand with 
her right hand. The three stand in a straight row, with the 
second man in the middle between the two ladies. 

The first man, having gone on to the third couple, joins 
hands with them, and the three circle once around to the left, 
(c) The first man and the third lady now break their hold 
with the third man and leave him standing alone, while they 
both go on to the fourth couple. As they advance to the 
fourth couple, and this is very important, the first man 
changes the lady from his left hand to his right hand, so 
she will be on his right side. (Remember that always when 
a couple approaches another, the ladies must stand on the 
right side of the men.) All four (the fourth couple, the third 
lady, and the first man) join hands and circle to the left 
once around, (d) Then the first man lets go his hold, and 
returns to his first position goes home alone. This leaves 
the third lady standing to the left of the fourth couple, the 
three of them in a row. 

This is simply a maneuver to move the first lady over to 
stand in a row of three, while the third lady stands with the 
fourth couple in a row of three directly opposite them. 
The first and third men stand opposite each other and alone. 

The call continues : 

Forward six and fall back six; (a) 

Forward two and fall back two; (b) 

Forward six and pass right through; (c) 

Forward two and pass right through. (d) 

On the call Forward six, or (a) each row of three on 
either side takes four steps forward toward the other, then 



68 COWBOY DANCES 

four steps back, still facing each other, into place. As they 
are falling back the call should be so timed that (b) the two 
lone men start forward four steps. Then as they fall back 
to place with four more steps, (c) the six (the two side 
threes) should be moving forward and pass through each 
other's formation to the opposite side, (d) The two lone 
men then pass each other and also trade places. 

In dancing, it is always customary to pass to the left as 
they do in English traffic, instead of to the right as they do 
in modern American traffic. To get a group of beginners 
in the habit of always passing to the left it is well to advise 
them to take right hands with the opposite person as they 
pass. This will assure them of passing correctly to the left. 
If some pass left while others pass right, the collision and 
confusion ruins the dance. So take time to teach them 
always to pass left by touching right hands while passing. 

Our figure is now just as it was, except that everyone 
has traded places with his opposite and is left standing 
on the wrong side. The last call, therefore, has to be re 
peated to put them right. 

Forward six and fall back six; 
Forward two and fall back two; 
Forward six and pass right through; 
Forward two and pass right through. 

Then continue with : 

Swing on the corner (a) 

Like swinging on the gate t 

And now your oivn (b) 

// you're not too late. 

Now allemande left (c) 

With your left hand 

And right to your partner 

And right and left grand. 

And promenade eight 

When you come straight. 

Remember that each man's corner, or his corner lady, 
is the lady on his left. So to come out of his figure of sym 
metrical three's and one's, each man (a) swings the girl on 
his left. Then (b) he swings his own partner, or the girl 
on his right. 



A SIMPLE SQUARE 69 

Then (c) they go directly from this swing into the 
Allemande left and Grand right and left, as in the previous 
dance. They then promenade back to their places. 

The whole dance is repeated for the second couple, be 
ginning the call with : 

Second couple out 

To the couple on the right 

And circle four. 

And after a promenade it is all repeated for the third 
couple, and finally for the fourth. 

After the fourth, or final promenade, you can again call : 

You knoiv where 
And I don't care. 
Take your honey 
To a nice soft chair. 

With this the dance is over, and they are all pleased 
because the dance is so simple and symmetrical and such 
good fun. If the caller times it right it keeps them moving 
back and forth through each other with a fascinating sort 
of routine. 

(Note: If any difficulty is encountered with the above 
explanations, it might be well to turn to pages 167 and 258 
for the regular line by line explanations in the second part 
of the book.) 



Chapter 4 

r 



V 



The 
Round, 
Dances 



IT WAS the custom at the old-time dances to form the sets 
for a square and while the sets were on the floor to dance 
through two complete dances or tips. Then a round dance 
would be played. And it in turn would be followed by the 
two tips of another square. 

The round dances were couple dances, the couples free 
moving over the floor as in the modern ballroom dance. But 
our grandmothers' couple dances were always special dances 
such as the polka, the schottische, or the varsouvianna, or 
mazurka. 

In the barn dances of today, or the so-called old-time 
dances of today, the same custom usually prevails of two 
squares and then a round dance repeating through the eve 
ning. But the round dance today is usually a one-step, or 
fox trot, or some modern dance. Only occasionally do they 
put in a real old-time round dance. The modern ''old-time 
dance" which we see advertised is often a transition and 
shows signs of breaking down into a completely modern- 
time dance, with perhaps one or two squares dragged into 
the evening. When such a group as that to which this book 
is addressed sets out to play with the genuine old-time 
dance, nothing but the old-time round dances should appear 
on the program. The modern should be completely taboo. 
Alternate your evenings if you will, one being completely 
modern and one completely old-time. Do not alternate the 
two in the program of any one evening. 

Even if you are teaching a group of beginners, the round 
dances must be introduced early in the evening, perhaps 
only one or two of them the first evening, repeating each 
later in the program to make sure it is well learned. But 
the variety introduced by the round dances is essential to 



THE ROUND DANCES 71 

a successful party. So it will be well before describing more 
squares to treat the commonest of the old-time round dances 
at this point, starting with the easiest. If the group gets 
so good that they later want a larger selection, you can turn 
to such a book as Henry Ford's Good Morning where these 
dances are completely described. But we shall limit our 
selves now to those dances that are common in the West. 

The Rye Waltz 

This is the easiest of all of the round dances to teach and 
to execute. The couples take the regular dance position; 
that is, the man holding the lady's right hand in his extended 
left and his right arm around her waist while her left hand 
rests on his shoulder. The music is the old familiar Scotch 
tune "Comin' Thru The Rye." The first four bars are played 
rather fast in their regular 4/4 time. The last four bars are 
changed and slowed down so that each beat is modified to the 
3/4 time of waltz rhythm, except the fourth or last bar 
which is left unchanged in its original 4/4 time ; that is, the 
last four bars where the words begin "Ilka lassie has her 
laddie" become 12 bars of 3/4 time and one final and fast 
bar of 4/4 time. Then it is all repeated as many times as 
desired. 

We shall describe the dance for the man, the woman, of 
course, using always the opposite foot in the opposite direc 
tion. Incidentally this Western arrangement is somewhat 
different from the Rye Waltz as danced in the East. 

On the first bar of the music, the man keeping his weight 
on his right foot extends his left foot out to the side and 
lightly touches the floor with his left toe. On the second beat 
he closes his left foot back to his right. On the third beat 
he extends and points his left foot again to the side and on 
the fourth closes it again to his right. Then he sashays to 
the left for the four beats of the second bar. That is, he 
steps left and closes his right to his left, again he steps left 
and closes his right to his left, and then steps left and shifts 
his weight to the left, with a step-close-step-close-step 
rhythm. Then during the next two bars of the music, the 
whole thing is repeated to the right; that is, with his weight 
shifted on to his left foot he points right, closes his right to 
his left, points right again, closes again and then sashays to 
the right with a step-close-step-close-step. 



72 COWBOY DANCES 

Then the music changes to a slow 3/4 time, and the 
couple waltzes around the room for twelve bars of the music. 
For what would be the last four bars of the waltz section, 
however, the music changes back to the snappy 4/4 time of 
the original, and they hippety-hop again to the man's left 
with a step-close-step-close-step. 

The whole routine is repeated as many times as desired, 
the music playing over and over and over again. (At some 
old-time dances you wonder if it will ever end.) 

As one gets used to the step he will find himself dipping 
slightly in the first part with his right knee as he extends 
and closes his left foot away from and to his right. And he 
will find it natural to want to make the return a little longer 
swing and put his left foot behind or in front of his right 
instead of merely closing to the side of it. It is customary 
in this case to cross it first behind and the next time in 
front. So the left foot points to the side, then crosses behind 
the right, points to the side, and then crosses in front of the 
left then the sashay. The lady, of course, does just the 
opposite, pointing right, crossing in front, pointing right, 
and then crossing behind. 

A variation called the Scotch is sometimes introduced to 
add a bit of fun. The dance is just the same except that the 
dancers hop like a Scotch reel throughout the first part. That 
is, instead of standing on the right and pointing with the 
left foot, they hop on the right while they point with the 
left, and hop again on the right while they close with the 
left making the whole thing very bouncy and jolly. 

We found another delightful variation current in the 
North Park of Colorado. Here instead of the point close, 
point close of the first four beats, they walk together to the 
left for three steps and close on the fourth; that is, still 
maintaining their regular dance position, they face slightly 
toward their extended hands (the man's left) , and starting 
with the outside feet take three steps and close. The man 
walks left, right, left, and closes his right to his left, and the 
lady does just the opposite. Then they do the sashay, or 
slide close, to the right in the regular form. Now they walk 
three steps and close to the man's right and the lady's left. 
Then they slide-close back to the left in the regular form and 
follow it all with the customary waltz. 

It is a pleasant and amusing variation and can be quite 
graceful, especially when they walk to the right, looking 



THE ROUND DANCES 73 

over their closed arms and moving with a long, gliding step, 
they can achieve quite a Spanish, tangolike grace. 

The young dancers at our school have invented a wild 
variation all their own with which they amuse themselves 
mightily. They walk to the left three steps in the North 
Park way, but instead of closing their feet together on the 
fourth bar they pivot on their outside feet (the man's left, 
the lady's right) , and do a complete revolution away from 
each other, coming together just in time for the sashay. 
They finish their walk in the other direction with another 
furious pivot preceding the sashay. And at the close of the 
waltz they do two complete revolutions away from each 
other in place of the slide-close sashay. They end with a 
deep bow if they get around in time. But this is just for fun 
and most decidedly is not an authentic variation of the 
Rye Waltz. 

The Schottische 

This is a delightful round dance, delightful both to do 
and to watch. The music can be found in the Pioneer Collec 
tion of Old-Time Dances referred to earlier. And Ford's 
arrangement is the form we like best, with three parts each 
with a full repeat. 

In the usual form the dancers stand side by side, the 
man's right arm around the lady's waist, and the lady's left 
hand on the man's shoulder. Starting with the outside feet 
(the man's left and the lady's right), they take three light 
running steps and then hop as they swing their inside feet 
up and forward. Then starting with the inside feet (the 
man's right and the lady's left) they take three running 
steps and a hop while they swing their outside feet up and 
forward. Then, facing each other, the man takes the lady's 
right hand in his left, which puts them now in the regular 
dance position, and in this position they take four step-hops 
(beginning with the man's left and the lady's right foot) 
while they rotate once around to the man's right. The com 
plete pivot leaves them facing forward again, and they let 
go hands and face forward, retaining only the waist- 
shoulder position, and repeat the whole thing. 

To describe with more detail it may be best to note 
carefully the man's part, understanding that the woman 
uses always the opposite foot and the corresponding motion. 



76 COWBOY DANCES 

The man standing with his partner on his right and 
holding her in a waist-shoulder position takes three light 
running steps forward, left, right, left, and then hops on 
his left foot while he swings his right foot up and forward. 
Then he runs again, right, left, right, and hops on his right 
while he swings his left foot forward. Now taking his 
partner's right hand in his left, he assumes the regular 
dance position and steps on his left and hops on his left, 
then steps right and hops with his right, and then repeats 
with a left and hop and a right and hop, all the time pivoting 
around in a right-face position. During the four hops he 
should have made a complete revolution and should be fac 
ing forward again. He lets go his partner's right hand, 
turns away from her so they are again side by side, and 
repeats the dance again as many times as desired. It often 
helps if the caller directs the men in their steps by calling 
left-right-left-swing ; right-left-right-swing ; left-hop ; right- 
hop; left-hop; right-hop. 

At most of the old-time dances I go to they do this over 
and over interminably at a rather slow tempo until I marvel 
at how they can keep it up. Occasionally some older couple 
will show some variation such as both stepping to the left 
with their left feet in the first part of the dance and hop 
ping on their left feet while they swing their right feet up 
across and in front of their left. Then they step right and 
hop right while they swing their left feet across to the right. 
Repeating this again to each side, they are ready for the 
closed or dance position and do the step-hop while they 
rotate with the others. Or occasionally instead of the step- 
hop in the second part, they do a little modified, rather open 
two-step. The regular two-step, you will remember, is to 
step on the left on the first beat of the music and close the 
right to the left and quickly step again on the left to the 
second beat of the music, then do the same to the right, and 
so on. They do not quite close, however, in their modified 
two-step, but step left on the first beat and then step quickly 
and lightly on the right and immediately with the left again 
on the second beat. So, instead of a left-hop, right-hop, they 
do a left-right-left, right-left-right 

Even with these variations the dance is still apt to be 
a little monotonous, especially since either the two-step or 
the hop calls for a complete rotation always in the same 
direction with a consequent dizziness. And it is always 



THE ROUND DANCES 77 

quite slow. When I Increase the tempo at the urgent request 
of my young people, the old-timers all cry out against it and 
say it is not the schottische until I sometimes wonder if 
it is not their age rather than their memory that keeps the 
tempo so slow, and if perhaps the young people even in the 
old times did not always prefer, and usually get, a little 
speed. 

We were delighted when the daughter of one of the 
pioneer women showed us how her mother used to dance the 
schottische over on the western slope of the Colorado 
Rockies back in the eighties. And since her dance is in three 
parts with each part repeated just as the music is arranged, 
I believe it to be the true form, and we have adopted it as 
our standard form of the schottische. We have since had 
several old-timers confirm it as the original form. It offers 
enough variety to be great fun to do. 

The first part is exactly as described above in our first 
description of the dance. It is repeated once as the music is 
repeated. Then the second part changes for the second part 
of the music as follows: Still holding the same waist- 
shoulder position, the dancers take the two sets of little 
running steps just as in the first part, left-right-left swing, 
right-left-right-swing, but instead of closing together in the 
familiar dance position and hopping together around to the 
right, they completely let go of each other, and turning away 
from each other, each hops independently, the man hopping 
on his left foot and turning in a left-face direction, and the 
woman hopping on her right foot in a right-face direction. 
On the first hop they turn away and are back to back, on the 
second hop (on the other foot, of course) they turn to 
gether and are face to face, on the third hop they turn back 
to back again, and on the fourth hop they finish face to 
face, and continue on until they are side by side in the 
waist-shoulder position and are running forward again on 
the repetition of this second part of the dance. 

The third part of the dance starts with the run exactly 
as the other two parts, but instead of the second half of the 
run, the partners let go of each other, and while doing the 
second part of the run, they turn completely away from 
each other in one position, making a complete revolution. 
As they turn back together they resume the waist-shoulder 
position and instead of hopping they rock forward and back 
on alternate feet. 



78 COWBOY DANCES 

The whole step of this third part for the man (with the 
lady, as usual, doing the complementary or opposite step) 
is run left, right, left, and hop left as he swings his right 
foot forward, break hold with partner and with shorter steps 
in position walk right, left, right, hop while he turns left 
about face. Then side by side again and resuming the 
waist-shoulder position he rocks forward on his left foot 
and lifts his heel slightly instead of a hop, rocks backward 
on his right foot and again rises on his toe, rocks forward 
on his left and rises, rocks back on his right with a rise. He 
then repeats the third part. 

As the music turns back to the first part, he starts at the 
beginning and repeats the w r hole dance as many times as 
desired. 

The Varsouvianna 

Perhaps the most graceful and most delightful of all 
the round dances is the Varsovienne. It originated in War 
saw, Poland, and from that city, with a few accidents of 
orthography, it took its name The dance spread all over 
Europe and took on different national characteristics. It 
moved on to our West, its name corrupted to Varsouvianna, 
and is a regular feature of our old-time dances. (So easy is 
oral corruption, I have even heard it unsmilingly called the 
"Varsity Anna.") It has its own special music, which can 
also be found in the Pioneer Collection of Old-Time Dances. 
Here it is called Ford's Varsovienne. For a real Western 
dance you should skip the first thirty-two bars of this music 
for it has been completely lost, and I have never heard it 
played in the West. Beginning with the thirty-third bar it 
is our authentic music. To be sure, since it is traditional 
with our fiddlers you can expect a little variation now and 
then from this printed score. 

There are sixteen bars of this old standard Varsouvianna 
tune in the West. Our oldest pioneers tell me that these 
sixteen bars were always repeated once. Then there came 
sixteen bars of special waltz, which certainly improves the 
dance and keeps it from growing monotonous. And in the 
musical arrangement just mentioned (Pioneer Collection 
of Old-Time Dances) the following sixteen bars are the 
standard form used for this waltz. But when I tried to get 
one of my fiddler friends to play it so for me, with complete 



THE ROUND DANCES 79 

scorn for all "note-readers" he said he could not play that 
tune and broke into "Where, oh where is my little dog gone" 
in perfect waltz time, and it served just as well. He likes the 
waltz and now he always trots the little dog out and makes 
them waltz whenever he plays the Varsouvianna. 

In the printed score the last variation following the 
waltz is perfectly authentic and is often heard in the West. 
It should be used for the second Varsouvianna step. But 
the first thirty-two measures of the printed score should 
best be omitted altogether. 

This lovely dance is coming back in Western society. 
For several years they have been dancing it w r ith a Spanish 
tempo in the ballroom of La Fonda, the leading hotel in 
Santa Fe. And in many of society's dances in Denver it is 
being introduced as a special number, though it is danced 
in its simplest form, over and over, and without the graceful 
relief of the waltz. 

This simple standard form is danced as follows; the 
couple stands side by side, the man a little behind his lady. 
He holds her left hand in his left, shoulder high, and reach 
ing across her right shoulder he holds her raised right hand 
lightly in his right. The two keep in step with each other, 
for the present. Later they will use opposite feet. 

With their weight on their left feet they stand with their 
right toes pointed forward and touching the floor to the 
right. On the first note of the music (an introductory note, 
the third beat of the previous bar) they each sweep the right 
foot back over the left instep, dipping the left knee slightly 
as they do so. On the next count (the first beat of the new 
bar) they point the right foot out to the right front, again 
touching the floor with the toe, and on the next count step 
in behind the right with the left foot. Then they each repeat 
with the same feet (the right) to the same side, sweep, point, 
step. The third time they again sweep back with the right, 
point with the right, and step with the left. (But instead of 
stepping in close behind the right with the left they this time 
step to the left side with the left foot.) On the next count 
they close the right foot in behind the left, and on the next 
count point the left foot, the toe touching the floor, out to 
the front and to the left. That is, they both make a cross 
over to the left. And as they do this left step-cross-point 
the lady takes fairly long steps while the man takes very 
short steps and passes his partner over in front of him 



86 COWBOY DANCES 

from his right side to his left side so that when they point 
with the left foot she is standing on his left, his left hand 
over her left shoulder and holding her left, while his right 
hand holds her right hand out to the right of her right 
shoulder. 

This may sound a trifle complicated, but is really very 
easy to do with the music, as the lovely old melody almost 
directs you to cross over and point to the left. 

As the musical phrase repeats itself on a lower note, 
they repeat the whole thing beginning with the left and 
crossing to the right. That is, they sweep back with the left, 
point with the left and step with the right. Again to the left 
they sweep-point-step. Then again they sweep left, point 
left, and step out right with the right, cross with the left as 
the lady crosses over in front of the gentleman, and finish 
again pointing with the right. 

Then the melody changes a little and directs them to cross 
back and forth twice, with the same cross-over step as the 
last half of the preceding; that is, they sweep back right, 
point right, step left, cross with the right, and point with 
the left; then (2) sweep left, point left, step right and cross 
left, and point right; then (3) sweep right, point right, 
step left, cross right, and point left; and (4) sweep left, 
point left, step right, cross left, and point right. The cross 
ing foot always steps in behind the stationary foot. 

Now this whole figure repeats itself as many times as 
desired. It is much pleasanter, however, to repeat it only 
once and then swing into sixteen measures of waltz before 
repeating it two more times, and so on. 

I usually teach this step to a group by calling with the 
music : 

Sweep, point, step, 

Sweep, point, step, 

Sweep, point, step, cross, point. 

Sweep, point, step, 

Sweep, point, step, 

Sweep, point, step, cross, point; 

Siveep, point, step, cross, point; 
Sweep, point, step, cross, point; 
Siveep, point, step, cross, point; 
Siveep, point, step, cross, point. 



THE ROUND DANCES 87 

Some teachers have them rise on the toe of the left foot as 
they sweep back with the right, then point with the right 
and close with the left. Although this is an accepted form, 
I think it a bit prettier to dip slightly with the left knee 
while sweeping the right foot back rather than to show much 
of a rise on the left toe. Or, if you want the movement very 
pronounced, you will direct them to use the old custom of 
hopping on the left while they sw r eep back with the right. 
And it is so instinctive for some people to put in this hop that 
they are apt to do it without your suggestion. But it is too 
jerky with a beginner, and I think it best to discourage the 
hop. 

And that, over and over again, is all there is to the 
Varsouvianna as you find it at most of our dances. Once in a 
while you may see a couple do a turn back instead of a 
cross-over. That is, on the sweep-point-step-cross-point, in 
stead of having the lady cross over in front of the man and 
get on his left side, she takes these short steps in position 
doing a rightabout-face as she does so, the man likewise 
doing a rightabout-face. This leaves them both facing di 
rectly backward and the lady now, of course, on the left of 
the man with his left arm over her shoulder. Then a left- 
about faces them forward and puts her on the right side, and 
so instead of crossing over she turns forward and back, and 
it proves a very graceful variation. 

Using essentially the same steps, the different nations 
have developed a great variety of positions and styles. The 
Mexicans have the loveliest variations that I have seen. 
They carry through the step not only in the standard posi 
tion, but in the regular dance position, in a back-to-back 
position, in a grand circle, and even in a grand right and left 
which is most delightful. And they do it all as a figure, with 
three couples working in and out from the points of a 
triangle. 

Perhaps it was their influence, or a European influence, 
but in any case the oldest pioneers tell me that it used 
always to be danced here in the West in a variety of posi 
tions and each alternating with the waltz. 

Miss Mary Kelleher, who gave me the three-part varia 
tion of the Schottische, has given me this arrangement, 
which in turn was brought by her mother from the western 
slope of Colorado where she danced it in the early days. It 
is the form we like best and that we always dance. 



88 COWBOY DANCES 

The first part is the same as the dance described above 
except that the partners use opposite feet, always pointing 
with the outside foot or the foot farthest from the partner. 
This makes it much more graceful and symmetrical, and is 
just as easy to execute as when the partners use the same 
foot and keep it, as it were, in step with each other. 

To be more specific, the man sweeps back and points with 
his left foot while the lady sweeps back and points with her 
right. This lets them each point out and away from the 
other, making a most delightful position for the onlookers. 
On the cross-over she steps left and then points left while he 
steps right and points right, which makes the cross-over 
easier and much more natural. This greater ease makes me 
think that this is the original and correct position for the 
dance and that the other form is a corruption introduced 
because it was easier to teach beginners if you let them all 
keep in step with their teacher and with each other. In this 
older form it becomes natural for each "point" to be away 
from your partner, adding considerable grace to the dance. 
After repeating this first part once, all the couples go into 
sixteen measures of waltz. 

In the second part the couples take the regular dance 
position; that is, with the lady's right hand resting in the 
gentleman's extended left hand and her left on his shoulder 
while his right encircles her waist. The first steps are the 
same as before, the gentleman sweeping back and pointing 
with his left foot, the lady with her right, and both looking 
and pointing in the direction of their extended arms. Since 
they are face to face, their two feet are almost together in 
the point, and their extended arms above the pointing feet. 
Instead of the cross-over they both walk with three short 
steps in the direction of their extended arms and then, 
turning together, point backward, the gentleman with his 
right and the lady with her left foot, and look back over 
their enclosing arms toward their pointing feet. Still look 
ing backward, they repeat the movement, this time the 
gentleman sweeping and pointing with his right foot and the 
lady with her left, and then with three short walking steps in 
this backward direction they turn together and both point 
front again, or in the direction of their extended arms. 



THE ROUND DANCES 89 

Now instead of the four cross-over steps back and forth, 
still in the dance position they take short steps in place, 
rotating half around to the right and pointing with the 
right. That is, each does a "right face" turn. Then they 
rotate back to the left and point again. Once more they 
rotate right and point, and then they return to the left and 
point, the lady always pointing with the opposite foot from 
the gentleman. This whole figure is repeated and again they 
waltz. 

In the last figure they take an open position, side by side, 
the gentleman's right arm around the lady's waist and her 
left arm on his right shoulder, their outside arms hanging 
naturally at their sides. The first part of the step is the same 
except they move much more definitely forward and instead 
of the cross-over they turn together, letting go their waist 
and shoulder hold, and face each other and turn completely 
backward, taking a new hold this time with the gentleman's 
left arm around the lady's waist and her right hand on his 
shoulder, and they finish this measure pointing backward. 
The next measure in this reversed position, of course, carries 
them back where they started, and in place of the cross 
over they turn together again, breaking holds, face forward 
taking their original hold and again finish by pointing 
forward. 

They could, of course, repeat this turning back and front 
a couple of times in the last part, and they actually do. But 
instead of turning together to accomplish this, they turn 
away from each other, and, each pivoting around, they meet 
facing backward and both point. Then turning away from 
each other they turn until they face forward and point 
again ; then away from each other and point backward, and 
a-way from each other and point forward again for the 
finish. They cannot hold on to each other at all in this last 
part, but the hands swing freely and usually come almost 
together over the pointing feet. The whole movement is 
flirtatious and graceful in the extreme. After repeating this 
whole last part they waltz again. And then the whole dance 
with all of its parts is repeated as many times as desired. 

In teaching this last part it pays to use a "call" at first, 
as follows : 



90 COWBOY DANCES 

Sweep, point, step. 

Sweep, point, step, 

Turn together and point back, 

Sweep, point, step, 

S^veep, point, step, 

Turn together and point front. 

Turn back to back, point back, 

Turn back to back, point front, 

Turn back to back, point back, 

Turn back to back, point front. 

The rhythm of this call is a little tricky, but with prac 
tice it works, and without it beginners turn in wild con 
fusion and get all mixed up, 

The Polka 

Another old-time round dance that is regularly used in 
the West is the polka which is often called the "pokey" in 
cowboy parlance, perhaps from the square dance figure 
"Three by three in the pokey oh, three by three and on we 
go." If one traces back through the New England and 
European varieties of the polka he can get into deep water 
in a discussion of just what the polka is. But the Western 
dance by that name is extremely simple. 

The couple stands side by side, either in the waist- 
shoulder position with the man's right arm around the lady's 
waist and her left hand on his shoulder, or in the cross- 
shoulder position, as in the Varsouvianna, where the man 
holds the lady's left hand in his left at the height of her 
shoulder and, crossing his right hand behind and over her 
right shoulder, holds her lifted right hand lightly in this 
position. 

The music is Jenny Lind's Favorite Polka, which can 
be found in the Pioneer Collection of Old-Time Dances above 
referred to. In the West I have only heard the first sixteen 
measures, which are repeated over and over. The last 
twenty-four measures are never used. 

The usual form of the dance is for each partner to stand 
with his weight on his left foot, and reaching forward with 



THE ROUND DANCES 91 

the right foot, to touch the right toe to the floor well in 
front of him, on the first count. Then bring the right 
foot back and touch the toe to the floor close beside the 
left foot on the second count. They then step forward on 
the right, close left to right, step right, and rise on the toe 
of the right foot for the next measure counting one-cmd-two- 
and. Then step forward on the left, close right, step left, 
and rise for the next measure; then step right, close left, 
step right and rise for the fourth measure. Then repeat the 
whole movement beginning with the left foot. That is, point 
forward with the left, count one-and and point back on the 
count two-and. Then left, right, left, rise; right, left, right, 
rise ; left, right, left, rise. The whole thing can be repeated, 
first beginning right and then beginning left, over and over 
again, point front, point back and then advance straight 
forward with three sets of polka steps then repeat. Most 
of the old-timers, in fact, do it interminably with no varia 
tion whatever. 

In the regular polka step some of our dancers on the 
count one-and, two-and, simply take three steps and a rest on 
the second and, that is, left, right, left, rest, then right, left, 
right, rest, instead of left, right, left, rise. They rest the 
last half of the beat instead of rising. As a matter of fact 
this rise is not on a beat or even a half beat but is really 
slipped in as a grace note just before the step of the first 
beat of the next measure. Many people use a hop instead of 
a rise, and historically it is perhaps the more correct. But 
this hop also should be a grace note slipped in before the 
beat, rather than a hop on the beat itself. Now and then we 
find a dancer who has the subtle trick of it. But on a 
Western dance floor the great majority either hop, or rise, 
or rest, but always right square on the count. And, I 
imagine, it is more forthright and appropriate for a heavy 
cowboy boot. So take your choice. 

Once in a while a couple will be seen doing the Heel and 
Toe Polka, although it is quite rare in the West. But it is 
seen often enough to merit a detailed description. In the 
Heel and Toe Polka the couples take the regular dance 
position, with the lady's extended right hand held in the 
man's left, and her left on his shoulder while his right 



"^v 




W 
J 
o 




THE ROUND DANCES 93 

encircles her waist. The man starts with his left foot, the 
lady with her right. The dance for the man is as follows 
(the lady, as usual, always using the opposite foot) : With 
his weight on his right foot he touches his left heel to the 
floor (his toe pointed upward) on the counts one-and, then 
he touches his left toe to the floor close to his right foot on 
the count tivo-and. He then steps left on one, closes with 
his right on and, steps left again on two, and rests on and. 
Then looking backward over his right shoulder he repeats 
it all with his right foot heel, toe, slide, close, slide. Now 
looking forward again to his left he repeats with the left 
heel, toe, slide, close, slide. And, looking back, he does a 
final heel, toe, slide, close, slide to the right. For the next 
eight measures they do a regular polka, rotating slowly to 
the right. It is simply a step, close, step, hop, first leading 
with the left foot and then repeated with the right lead. 
The polka is often done with a bouncy little light step 
although it looks better to execute it smoothly, with the hop 
merely a rise on the toe or a lifting of the heel, or a complete 
rest can be used if the hop or rise are not enjoyed. 

We were dancing once in Santa Fe, New Mexico, when 
a charming little lady who, they told me, had been reared on 
a cattle ranch near Las Vegas, protested that our Heel and 
Toe Polka was all wrong. "You should do it on a dollar," she 
cried. "We always boasted we could do it on a dollar!" So 
I asked her to dance with me, and found that what she 
wanted was the heel and toe as described in the last para 
graph but instead of a slide-close-slide, she wanted a stamp- 
stamp-stamp done in position. Then to the other side heel- 
toe-stamp-stamp-stamp. All done without moving from one 
spot, and repeated again in position. Then we scampered all 
around the room in the eight bars of a regular polka. 
"There," she said, "that's the way the boys on our ranch 
always did it. That's the real polka." 

The polka we like best is a sort of cross-over polka which 
we saw danced by a group from Walsenburg, Colorado. The 
first two parts were exactly like the regular polka, the part 
ners side by side with the gentleman holding the lady's left 
hand in his left and reaching his right hand over her 
shoulder to hold her right hand shoulder high. They both 



94 COWBOY DANCES 

touched their right toe forward and then back and then did 
three polka steps forward right, left, right, hop ; left, right, 
left, hop ; right, left, right, hop. They then repeated all of 
this beginning with the left foot. On the next movement the 
man crossed the lady over and back twice as follows : First 
touching the right toe forward and then back, they followed 
by doing a cross-over step instead of a polka step. The 
gentleman let go the lady's right hand and still holding her 
by the left helped her turn in front of him with three steps, 
he in the meantime taking his steps in a stationary position. 
The lady was then on his left side, facing directly backward, 
their four shoulders in a straight line and facing in oppo 
site directions. They now each touched their left toe for 
ward and back, but since they faced in opposite directions 
this made a graceful position, with the left foot of each 
almost touching that of the other. Now instead of a polka 
step, the lady crossed back to place passing under the man's 
left arm, and doing a left-face turn as she passed under. 
She then stood again on his right side, and he reached over 
her right shoulder and again took her right hand. They 
touched right toes forward and back again and she again 
crossed over to his left side, facing backward. Then touch 
ing left toes forward and back, she crossed under his left 
arm and passed back into place on his right side. Now the 
whole dance was repeated as many times as desired. 

The Waltz 

The best of all round dances is the waltz. It is often 
danced as a single number, and in our Western dancing is 
even more often a part of one of the other round dances, and 
appears in many squares such as the Waltz Quadrille. 

In the great majority of cases it is danced incorrectly. 
And the people who dance it incorrectly, alas, always insist 
that they are waltzing. They are really doing a smooth two- 
step to waltz time, a dance that is called the redowa. There 
was a time when it was listed on the old dance programs 
as such, but today its execution is hopelessly confused with 
the waltz and it has claimed the name of the waltz. A 
modern dance orchestra seldom plays a waltz. It is unpopu- 



THE ROUND DANCES 95 

lar on a modern program. And I believe this is only 
because practically none of the moderns know how to waltz. 
In the days of Strauss it was the favorite dance and was 
done beautifully. It would still be a favorite, no other dance 
would compare with it, if it were only danced correctly. 

In the three beats of waltz time the true waltz is danced 
step, step, close, while the redowa (or two-step in waltz 
time) is danced step, close, step. The first is graceful and 
beautiful while the other is a little jerky and unsatisfying. 
Yet notice that it is all a matter of timing. In a series of 
waltz steps, three bars for instance, it would be step, step, 
close; step, step, close; step, step, close. And the two-step 
or redowa would be the same thing on a different timing. It 
is step, close, step ; step, close, step ; step, close, step. In each 
case since there are two steps connected by a close; the 
beginner simply cannot see the difference between them. But 
in the waltz the first step is accented by holding it. It bor 
rows nearly a quarter of a count from the next beat, and 
this gives the fascinating grace which made is so over 
whelmingly popular in the days of Strauss. But the step, 
close, step somehow destroys this subtle rhythm and has 
relegated the so-called waltz to a place among the antiques. 

I have never tried to teach a group of beginners but that 
one or two superior couples would dance away independently 
from the instruction, blithely and proudly doing the two-step 
or redowa. And when I called their attention to it they 
indignantly insisted that they were waltzing. Only a matter 
of timing made them wrong and yet this timing makes all 
the difference in the world. 

And so if you would learn the delights of the true waltz 
you must take time and earnestly endeavor to overcome the 
instinctive and incorrect redowa. It will repay you abund 
antly in satisfaction. 

Our grandfathers learned to waltz from a dancing mas 
ter; and his commonest device in teaching them was 
"waltzing in a square." It will pay you to master it. Either 
chalk a square on the floor some twenty-two or twenty-four 
inches on each side, or imagine such a square. Stand with 
both feet together in the upper left-hand corner of the 
square. As you count one, step back with your left foot to 



96 



COWBOY DANCES 



the lower left-hand corner. As you count two, step back 
and diagonally with your right foot to the lower right-hand 
corner of the square. As you count three close your left 




LEARNING TO WALTZ IN THE TRADITIONAL SQUARE 
TWO MEASURES 

First Bar of the Music 
Count 1 Step straight back along the side of imaginary square with 

the left foot. 
Count 2 Step diagonally to the other back corner of the square with 

the right foot. 
Count 3 Close the left foot to the right foot. 

Second Bar of the Music 
Count 4 Step forward to the upper corner of the square with the 

right foot. 
Count 5 Step diagonally to the corner of the square from which you 

started with the left foot. 
Count 6 Close the right foot to the left foot. 
Repeat this over and over until the waltz step becomes instinctive. 

foot to your right so they are both together in the lower 
right corner. Now on the second measure count one again 
and step forward with your right foot to the upper right- 
hand corner of the square; count two and step diagonally 
forward with your left foot to the upper left, and as you 
count three close your right foot to your left, and you will 
again be standing with both feet together in the upper left- 
hand corner of the square. Now repeat this slowly with the 



THE ROUND DANCES 97 

count until your feet move Instinctively. Then with the 
music repeat it again and again. It is simply an exaggerated 
waltz, first back on the left and then forward on the right, 
and thus around and around inside our practice square. 

As soon as one becomes familiar with the step, he should 
accent the first step by holding it a little longer, even while 
dancing in his square, and thus establish the subtle rhythm 
of the waltz. He can take his partner in his arms in the 
regular dance position, and they can both dance in the prac- 




PUESUIT WALTZ OR WALTZING STRAIGHT AHEAD 
TWO MEASURES 

First Bar of Music 
Count 1 Step forward on right foot. 
Count 2 Take second step on beyond with left foot. 
Count 3 Close right foot to side of left foot. 

Second Bar of Music 
Count 4 Step forward with left foot. 
Count 5 Step on beyond with right foot. 
Count 6 Close left foot to side of right foot. 

Repeat over and over indefinitely. 

To reverse take steps backward in reverse order. 

tice square, she starting forward on her right as he goes 
back on his left, arid she going back on her left as he steps 
forward on his right. 

Once the waltz rhythm is established, most experienced 
dancers can carry on turning and pivoting naturally in a 
true waltz anywhere over the floor. But less experienced 
dancers will find it well to practice a forward step after 
they master the square. Moving in a straight line to music, 
they step forward on the right, then forward on the left, and 
then close the right to the left; then forward on the left, and 
forward on the right, and close the left to the right. Keep 
on moving forward with a left, right, close; right, left, close; 
etc., until the end of the hall is reached. Then for practice 



98 COWBOY DANCES 

return by moving backward. Step back with the left, then 
back with the right, then close the left to the right. Con 
tinue backward with a right, left, close; left, right, close; 
etc., until back in position. Couples, of course, can practice 
this together in the regular dance position, the lady moving 
backward while the gentleman moves forward and return 
ing vice-versa. In this pursuit or forward step it often 
helps to go around the square a couple of times and then 
start forward. 

If this much is mastered the turn will probably come 
instinctively : but the old dancing masters had a device for 
teaching the turn that is quite enlightening and a surprising 
amount of fun to do. If you would like to try it, chalk a 
larger square on the floor, forty or more inches on each side, 
and with your chalk draw a diagonal in each corner chop 
ping off about eight or nine inches of the corner. And when 
you are directed to step in a corner of the square you step 
along the side only as close as this diagonal, or truncation, 
will permit. 

Begin this time by standing with both feet together in the 
upper left-hand corner and with both heels against the top 
line facing the center of the square. As you count one, step 
your right foot forward to the left side with the toe touching 
the left line immediately next to this upper left diagonal. 
On count two, step with your left foot so your left toe 
touches the left line immediately adjacent to the lower 
diagonal line (this, of course, leaves your back to the middle 
of the square), and on the third count, close your right foot 
to your left, leaving both feet together toeing the left side 
line next to the bottom diagonal. On the next count one, 
step with your left foot along the lower diagonal with the 
heel next to the near end of the bottom ; on count two, step 
with your right foot so its heel touches the far end of the 
bottom line (you are now facing the center of the square) ; 
and on count three, close your left foot to your right, both 
heels against the bottom line. Continue for the next mea 
sure, on count one, with the right toe against the lower end 
of the right side; count two, the left toe touches the upper 
end of the right side (back now to the center) ; and count 
three, the right foot is closed to the left so both toes are 
against this side line. On the last measure, count one, the 
left heel is moved to touch the near end of the top line ; count 
two, the right heel to the far side of the top (now facing 



THE ROUND DANCES 99 




WALTZ TURN WITHIN A SQUARE 
FOUR MEASURES 

Stand near 12 at the right side of a square (whose sides are 
numbered 3 6 9 and 12) and which has its four corners 
clipped off (as 1 4 7 and 10). 

First Measure 

Count 1 Step with right foot and face out and to the right. 
Count 2 Step with left foot to far end of that side. 
Count 3 Close right foot to left foot. 

Second Measure 

Count 4 <Step back with left foot to near end of next side of square 

facing in. 

Count 5 Step to far end of same side with right foot. 
Count 6 Close left foot to right foot, 

Third Measure 

Count 7 Step diagonally forward to near end of next side with right 

foot facing out. 

Count 8 Step with left foot to far end of this same side. 
Count 9 Close right foot to left foot. 

Fourth Measure 

Count 10 Step diagonally back with left foot to near end of the side 

from which you started. 
Count 11 Step with right foot to far end of this side, putting foot 

down in original position. 
Count 12 Close left foot to right foot and you are back where you 

started from. 

Repeat over and over until order of steps and complete revolution 
become instinctive. 

By starting at the other end of this side with the left foot the 
entire figure can be reversed. 



100 COWBOY DANCES 

center) ; and count three, the left foot is closed to the right 
and you are standing again at the upper left-hand corner 
as in the beginning, having made a complete revolution by 
facing out, in, out, and in again. 

The little mechanical device of the square makes it rather 
delightful and surprising. Go around inside the square 
several times to music, and then reverse your turn by start 
ing in the upper right-hand corner with both heels touching 
the top line. Then, of course, step forward with your left to 
the upper right side, then with your right to the lower right 
side and bring your left to your right in this lower corner. 
Then backward with your right to the nearest lower corner, 
and so on around the square revolving in an opposite direc 
tion from your first right lead. 

Now you are ready for free waltzing anywhere on the 
floor. And if ever you get in trouble go back to the good 
old square again and master the difficulty. Constantly strive 
for the rhythm, for the first held beat, and for the subtle 
balance that makes the waltz a thing of joy. 

You are apt to find rhythm your chief difficulty in get 
ting started on the true waltz. Once started, the waltz takes 
care of itself. But it is important to start right. In an old 
dance book I once found the description of a waltz start 
that is so helpful and so graceful that most of our dancers 
always use it. And strangely enough it is very similar to 
the popular hesitation step of today, in spite of its age. On 
the first beat of the music the man steps back on his left 
foot so emphatically as to raise his right foot in the air in 
front of him. The lady steps forward on her right and lets 
her left rise parallel to his right. Balanced back in this 
position with their free feet raised from the floor and point 
ing from them they both rise on the toe of the foot on which 
they are standing on the second beat, and lower their sup 
porting heels to the floor on the third. Their free feet still 
poised in the air, they are now ready to step out on them on 
the first beat of the second measure and to go into a regular 
waltz. That is, the man lowers his raised right foot and 
steps on this right on the first beat, then on his left, and 
closes his right to his left in a regular waltz. Meanwhile, the 
lady lowers and steps on her raised left foot and continues 
in the regular waltz. 

It was an old rule that a waltz should always start with 
the man stepping back on his left foot and the lady forward 



THE ROUND DANCES 



101 



on her right, but In this case the man balances on his left, the 
lady on her right, the gentleman counting the one-two-three 
of the waltz with a step, up, down on his left foot; the 
rhythm is established, and he is off to a perfect start. 

On the Western dance floor some waltzers will be seen 
doing the Spanish waltz from our Southwest, pivoting and 
changing direction on each first step. That is, the man takes 
his first step directly to the side and as he puts his foot 
down he pivots on his toe so that he faces in the opposite 




SPANISH WALTZ 
TWO MEASURES 
First Measure 

Count 1 Stand facing north, step sidewards or west with the left foot. 
Count 2 Pivot on the ball of the left foot and swing the right foot 
clear on beyond, and put it down at a distance. You are now 
facing south, feet separated. 
Count 3 Close left foot to right foot. 

Second Measure 

Count 4 Step with right foot to the side or to the west. 
Count 5 Pivot on ball of right foot and swing left foot and place it 

on beyond. You are now facing north again. 
Count 6 Close right foot to left foot. 

Repeat indefinitely or reverse. 

direction. At the same time he has swung his other foot on 
by and in the same direction as the first step and he then 
brings his feet together then he repeats, leading with the 
other foot. This means that if he is facing south at starting 
he takes all steps sidewards and to the west and by pivoting 
alternately faces north, south, north, south, rotating con 
tinually as he advances with sideward steps always to the 
west. It is lovely to watch and fun to do. 

Or on our Western dance floor we may see a modern 



102 



COWBOY DANCES 



young couple who have just taken lessons In the modern 
waltz from a famous New York teacher. If we watch their 
footwork, they will probably advance in a series of lovely 
looping, elongated triangles. The first step forward, the 
second foot loops in toward it and then out to the side where 
the first foot joins it; that is, the second step swings close 
but stops, out to the side even with the first step, while in the 
old waltz the second step swung clear on past as in natural 
walking. The diagram illustrates this. 




MORE MODERN PURSUIT WALTZ WITH SHORTER STEP 
TWO MEASURES 

First Measure 

Count 1 Step forward with left foot. 

Count 2 Step with right and place it out to right of the left foot. 
Count 3 Close left foot to right foot. 

Second Measure 

Count 4 Step forward with right foot. 

Count 5 Step with left and place it out to left side of right foot. 
Count 6 Close right foot to left foot. 

Repeat over and over, continuing forward, until steps become 
instinctive. 

Ancient to modern, what is the waltz? Does it have a 
lovely little Viennese dip, or should it be so smooth and 
even you could carry a glass of water on your head without 
spilling a drop? Oh, here comes an old-timer, and from the 
look on his face the dear old man is going to tell me some 
thing is wrong. "Professor," he says in kindly reproach, 
"you are backing your lady. When I was a young feller we 
considered that such an insult that we'd fight the feller that 
backed a girl we liked." What spacious ballrooms or barn 
floors they must have had, when the man dared to back up so 



THE ROUND DANCES 103 

the lady could always go forward. Today a man must move 
forward, looking over his backing lady's shoulder in order 
to steer a course through the crowd that packs the floor. 
But I back up to please the old man, wondering if I can 
keep from knocking someone down while I do it. As I pass 
him again I smile proudly, but he beckons to me. "Did you tell 
our orchestra to play that fast?" "Yes," I confess, "I did." 
"Young man, a waltz is always slow and dreamy and you 
know that," and he winks at me with deep relish. As I back 
manfully away I recall that young Strauss was considered 
as dangerous and daring as a modern swing artist, and 
that he whirled his waltzers at a dizzy and exhilarating 
speed. Could it have been the sixties to the nineties that 
slowed the waltz down till it died ? And will it someday come 
back again as a dance for the young, the loveliest and most 
joyous dance that ever graced a ballroom? 



Chapter 5 



More 
Squares 



The Docey-Doe 

IT WAS the customary order at a Western dance to get the 
sets out on the floor and do two square dances, then do a 
round dance, then two more squares, and so on through the 
evening. But gradually the round dances became more and 
more the modern one-step, fox trot, etc., and the program, 
following the modern tendency, became mostly round dances 
with perhaps only two squares called during the whole eve 
ning. If you are reviving the old Western dance, keep your 
round dances in the background and build your programs 
two to one of squares. 

If this is your first dance and you have just tried the Rye 
Waltz or some simple round dance, call your sets out on 
the floor for another dance. It is customary to call "Form 
your sets for another square" or "Form your sets for a 
quadrille." And then the caller walks around the floor help 
ing each set to form. If he finds a set lacking a couple he 
calls "one more 'two* here" until he fills out the set. And 
after all the sets are filled, one lone couple may come out on 
the floor looking for a set, and the caller will help them by 
calling out, "Three more 'twos' here, let's form another set. 
That's the stuff, thank you. Now two more 'twos F Ah, here 
comes a couple. Now one more 'two/ please. Come, folks, 
come, let's get this dance started. One more couple, please," 
And he goes out and commandeers a couple from the side 
lines if he has to, and his floor is ready. 

Ordinarily he would start the music and swing into a 
call without letting anyone but his fiddler know what was 
coming. But this is a first dance, and he will have to pause 
for a good deal of instruction. Perhaps right now he should 
teach the docey-doe. 



MORE SQUARES 105 

This maneuver, usually spelled do-si-do, recurs over and 
over in most of the squares. Whenever a couple executes a 
figure with another couple they usually finish with a little 
subchorus circle four and docey-doe. Then, when they have 
gone around and done the same with all three couples and 
are back home, they usually all unite in a general chorus 
which is the Allemande left and Grand right and left. This 
subchorus, executed by fours, is so common that it must be 
mastered soon. 

It is so important that it may be well to interpolate a 
discussion of it and its possible origin at this point. One 
of the common figures in the New England Quadrille, 
brought over from France, is the Dos-a-dos or back to 
back. This is executed by a lady and a gentleman advancing 
toward each other (as the opposite corners in the Virginia 
Reel), passing around each other back to back without 
touching in any way, and each walking backward to their 
original place. Of course, the French pronunciation was 
"dose-ah-doe" ; and in London, or in Boston, where French 
was still current, it would be correctly pronounced. But in 
the Lowlands of Scotland or carried by those Lowlanders to 
the Appalachian Mountains of America there might be a 
corruption such as "do-si-do," and the figure could be and 
probably was developed into a more complicated and more 
joyous maneuver. The common Briton has a genius for mis 
pronunciation. Note his "cross of the dear Queen/' the 
"chere reine" corrupted into "Charing Cross," "Bethlehem" 
changed to "bedlam," the "contra dance" with its line 
against line called a "country dance." So do-si-do seems 
quite inevitable to me in an oral tradition. Years later when 
someone wished to write it down he mistakenly suspected 
it of a relationship with the old musical notation, the "so, la, 
si, do" of the upper scale, and called it do-si-do. As it moved 
west it sounded more and more like two words, "docey-doe" 
When a literary friend who heard me call one night wrote 
me a note headed by a little drawing of a deer coming over 
a mountain and labeled "docey-doe" this impression of mine 
was confirmed ; hence I deliberately depart from convention 
and spell the Western variant docey-doe. 

Now in the Kentucky Running Set we find one of the 
first forms, a circle four with the four holding hands but 
with the men back to back or dos-a-dos while the women are 
face to face in the circling four. When they broke it was 




O 
A 




CQ 
O 
Q 








Pi 
3 







o 





108 COWBOY DANCES 

natural for each man to swing the opposite lady around be 
hind him with his right hand and then swing his partner 
with his left and lead her on to the next couple. This simple 
form still survives, you will remember, in the Form a Star 
with the right hand cross which you danced earlier in the 
evening, except that the circle four was omitted, and the 
men were not back to back. 

Later, it seems natural that the four would circle while 
all facing in, and a new movement would be required before 
they could conveniently swing their opposites with their 
right, and the more complicated it was the more fun it would 
be. So we find a form where each gentleman passes his lady 
beyond the other lady (that is, each lady passes between the 
opposite couple) from her partner's right hand to his left, 
then the two gentlemen swing in and pass each other back to 
back, dos-a-dos, still holding their partners by the left hand 
and continuing their pivots while keeping hold. They are 
now in a position and swinging in a direction which makes 
it inevitable to swing the opposite with the right and, of 
course, to finish by swinging partners with the left. This, 
to me at least, traces the evolution of the French dos-a-dos 
to the Western docey-doe with complete satisfaction. 

Start very simply and very slowly, if you would save 
time. Let two couples stand holding hands in a circle of four, 
each gentleman's partner in his right hand, and the opposite 
lady in his left. Now let each gentleman break his hold with 
the opposite and pass his lady from right to left so that she 
passes between the opposite gentleman and his partner, of 
course, breaking holds with her partner to be able to do this, 
and then the gentleman takes her left hand in his left; that 
is, each gentleman passes his lady's left hand from his right 
hand to his left in such a way that at the moment of break 
between his two hands she passes beyond the opposite lady, 
and the opposite lady passes between him and his own lady. 
Now he continues the motion by passing her around behind 
him with his left hand, she, of course, doing a left turn. He 
must not turn with her, but must keep facing the opposite 
gentleman all the while. As she gets behind him he must, of 
course, let go her hand. Otherwise he would have to pivot 
around with her, and that would spoil everything. She con 
tinues encircling him, and as she comes around to his side she 
is in a position to be taken by her right hand by the opposite 
gentleman. So each gentleman passes his lady behind him 



MORE SQUARES 109 

with his left, releases her to let her go on around behind 
him, and reaches out with his right hand and takes the on 
coming opposite lady. He passes her behind him with his 
right hand, releases her in the same manner so she can com 
plete encircling him, and takes his oncoming partner with 
his left. As he turns her he puts his right hand behind her 
waist where her right hand palm upon her hip awaits it and 
walks with her to whatever position the continuing dance 
requires. 

It all sounds very complicated in words, but is extremely 
easy on the floor once you get the idea. The gentleman 
beginners have three favorite ways of muddling up the 
docey-doe. The commonest error is in forgetting to face 
always the opposite gentleman, and in turning around or 
pivoting as they pass the ladies behind them. The second 
commonest mistake is trying to hold on to their partners 
while they pass them beyond the opposite ladies. This is, 
of course, physically impossible, as the resulting tangle will 
prove. And a few of the gentlemen forget to let go of the 
ladies as they pass them around behind them. But it would 
require an arm as long and supple as a boa constrictor to 
pass anyone completely around behind you without letting 
go hands. 

The ladies, bless 'em, also have their favorite mistakes. 
Usually they try to turn to the right around the opposite 
gentleman instead of to the left around their partner as 
soon as they are released and are passing beyond the oppo 
site lady at the beginning of the figure. But if they will 
concentrate on doing a "left turn" by giving their left hands 
to their own partners and circling behind them they will 
have no trouble. Then, often, when they circle their part 
ners they seem to think the figure is over and refuse to 
encircle the opposite gentleman next. They must do a com 
plete figure eight, encircling each man. 

It often pays as a bit for preliminary practice for the 
two men to stand stationary, close, and face to face, and pass 
the ladies behind them in a series of figure eights. They 
will pass their partners behind them with the left hands and 
their opposites behind them with their right hands alter 
nately over and over again until this essential part of the 
figure is established. And the ladies will probably never 
again encircle the opposite first after they have done a 
dozen or more figure eights around the stationary men. 




1. Four hands up 




2. and here we go 

BOGEY-DOE 




3. Around and around 







4. and a docey-doe! 

00CEY-DOE 




5. A doe and a doe 




6. And a little more doe. 

DOCBY-DQE 




7. Chicken in the bread tray 




8. Pickirt up 
DOCEY-DOE 




9. the dough. 




10. Owe more 

DOCEY-DOE 




11, and home 




12. we go ! 

DOCEY-DOE 



116 COWBOY DANCES 

If the men will remember to face each other always and 
the ladies will remember to begin with a left turn to do a 
figure eight beginning with the left turn it will all go as 
smoothly as clockwork. 

Now that the elements of this figure are mastered, let's 
slick it up a little. It is always preceded by a circle four; that 
is, the two couples, holding hands in a circle, circle around 
to the left until the call of docey-doe. It is often called Four 
hands up and here we go, 'round and around and a docey-doe. 
I expect it means four pairs of hands up and clasped, just 
as Eight hands 'round means eight pairs or eight dancers 
circling to the left. The dancers will find that it is just as 
easy to break into a docey-doe from the moving circle. But 
now it becomes instinctive and altogether correct for the 
men to move forward to seize the ladies' hands and to move 
backward as they swing them behind. They always more or 
less face each other, but weave back and forth with the 
ladies in a free-stepping and instinctive grace as they do so. 

In fact, as the couples get expert, they will put in all 
sorts of flourishes. The commonest of these flourishes is for 
the men to swing past each other back to back as they swing 
their partners around with their left hands, and then, letting 
go, to continue a full pivot in order to take the opposite lady 
with the right hand. Then they pass the opposite gentleman 
again, back to back, as they swing the opposite lady with the 
right hand and do another full pivot in order to catch their 
partners with their left hands. This is the old form of the 
docey-doe described from the mountains of Kentucky. 

I have seen some of our oldest Western pioneers precede 
the docey-doe with the call ladies doe, and the two ladies did 
a regular New England do$-a-dos, or back to back. They 
then called and gents you know and the two gentlemen did 
a dos-a-dos across their four. Then circle four and docey-doe, 
and they finished with the regular docey-doe described above. 
In fact, this ladies doe and gents you know has become just 
a bit of patter used by the caller while the four is executing 
the regular docey-doe. And beginners must never be wor 
ried by this patter, the caller is just amusing himself, sort 
of talking to himself in his sleep, and he has dozens of 
variants of this docey-doe call. Once you hear docey-doe 
swing into the figure and let the caller rave on as he pleases. 
One of the commonest bits of patter you will hear, if you 
can distinguish the words, will be something like this : 



MORE SQUARES 117 

Four hands up and here ice go 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 
A doe and a doe and a little more dough, 
Chicken in a bread tray pickin* up the dough 
And one more change and on we go. 

And you will find it is timed so perfectly to the figure 
that as he says on you go, you have finished it all and are 
presenting yourself and your partner to the next couple for 
the next figure in the dance. 

In some parts of the Western country I find what I con 
sider to be a corruption or simplification of the docey-doe. 
It consists simply of the women doing a pair of figure eights 
around the men. It would follow the simple call : 

Swing your opposite with your right, 
Now your partner with your left, 
Noiv your opposite with your right, 
Now your partner with your left. 

With no passing between and no turning left at the 
start it is easier for beginners to do. And I am convinced 
that that is how it happened the original form was too 
difficult and was lost. And it is natural that these simpler 
variants should appear. The only difficulty is that each 
group thinks his variant is right. They will ask you quite 
innocently, "Do you do it the right way or the wrong way?" 
meaning "Do you do it my way or your way?" They seldom 
know anything of the history of the figure; they only feel 
that the way they first learned it, even if it were only last 
week, is the "old way" and any variation they learn this 
week, regardless of how ancient or authentic it may be is, 
of course, to them the "new way." It is truly inspiring to 
see the autonomous pride with which each group feels 
certain that it alone is authentic and the rest of the world 
is out of step. 

The Lady Round the Lady and the Gent So Low 

This is one of the simplest, the commonest, and the most 
popular of the dances that uses the docey-doe. And so, as 
soon as your sets have all mastered the docey-doe, it is a 
good call to begin with. Some fours may still be having 
trouble with their docey-doe. But if those who know how 



118 COWBOY DANCES 

have demonstrated to the beginners, and helped them until 
they have learned it, and if each couple in the set has prac 
ticed it a few times with every other couple in the set, they 
should be ready for a dance and a chance to try it out. 

You may use the first introduction that you learned in 
Chapter Three since it is the commonest and most usual 
form. Or if you want fun and action call : 

All jump up and never come down 
Swing your honey around and around 
'Till the hollow of your foot 
Makes a hole in the ground. 
Promenade, boys, promenade! 

All of which simply directs them to jump playfully up 
in the air (and how they love to jump high and silly!) and 
then take the swing hold (modified regular dance position, 
see Chapter Four) and swing around and around until the 
call comes to promenade, when they take crossed hands and 
march once around the square, to the right, &nd back to 
their own positions ready for the dance proper to begin. 

Now call : 

First couple out 
To the couple on the right 
With the lady 'round the lady 
And the gent so low. 

The first couple moves out to the second couple with the 
lady in the lead. The second couple separate from each other 
so the lady can pass between them and continue with a left 
turn by walking completely around the second lady. The 
first gentleman follows her around this lady. I am told that 
originally this was called and the gent also, but this was a 
little awkward and was sort of inverted to the gent so low. 
It is usually spelled "solo" when printed, perhaps because 
the man does a "solo" behind the lady. But since the accent 
is always on the second syllable as called, I have spelled it 
in the less frequent form. 

The call continues : 

And the lady 'round the gent 
But the gent don't go. 



MORE SQUARES 119 

The first lady now continues in a figure eight by circling 
with a right turn around the second gentleman. In the mean 
time, since "the gent don't go," the first gentleman, having 
circled the second lady, stops there standing beside her, 
and as his lady circles the second gentleman it brings her 
around between the two men ready for : 

Four hands up and here we go 
Around and around with a docey-doe. 

Taking hands in a circle, the gentlemen opposite each 
other, and the ladies the same, each gentleman with his own 
lady in his right hand, they circle to the left and then exe 
cute the docey-doe described above. As they finish, the call 
goes on : 

On to the next 

With the lady 'round the lady 

And the gent so low. 

And the lady 'round the gent 

But the gent don't go. 

And four hands up, etc. 

They do the whole thing through the docey-doe with the 
third couple. Then on to the next and they do it all with the 
fourth. Then: 

Balance home and everybody swing. 
Now allemande left with your left hand, 
Right to your partner and right and left grand. 
And promenade eight when you come straight. 

They all do this general chorus figure of the allemande 
and right and left as described in Chapter Three. 

Then the second couple is called out to the couple on the 
right, and the whole thing is repeated for them until they 
have danced the figure and the docey-doe with every other 
couple in turn, and finally balance home to join with all the 
others in another allemande left and grand right and left. 
It is then all repeated for the third couple, and for the 
fourth, and after this final grand right and left, the dance is 
ended with the call promenade to your seats or promenade 
you know where and I don't care. 

Or if you want to follow the regular Western fashion 
and dance two squares in succession, you will call there you 



120 COWBOY DANCES 

stand or that's it, and they will finish their promenade and 
stand in their squares waiting for the second tip, or second 
call. 

Now that the rudiments are learned you can turn to any 
of the calls in the second part of this book and try another 
dance. But some of them are quite complicated, and had 
better be left for a later day. Some of the easiest in the 
docey-doe pattern are I'll Swing Your Girl You Swing Mine, 
or Two Gents Swing with the Elbow Swing. In this latter 
the gentlemen can avoid mix-ups by remembering always to 
swing each other with the right elbows and to swing the 
ladies with left elbows. Around that Couple and Swing at 
the Wall is easy and popular, or Dive for the Oyster. This 
last looks very complicated, but is really very simple, and 
most groups like it best when they do it badly. As soon as 
they get it smooth, and there is no one to laugh at for his 
blunders half the fun goes out of it. So it is a great favorite 
with beginners, and even old-timers love it when they have 
beginners to astonish. 

In the symmetrical selection of dances, Ladies to the 
Center and Back to the Bar is a favorite. Walk through it 
slowly first and stress the fact that the star must continue 
holding hands after they pick up the ladies on their arms. 
Once they get the idea of allemande left just one and prome 
nade the girl you swung, and of always taking the new girl 
to the gentleman's home position, it will all go as smoothly 
as silk. And there are other dances in this section that be 
ginners might want to try. Swing the Ladies to the Center 
and Let them Stand is very easy to do. 

The Down the Center and Split the Ring type of dance 
is also easy. Perhaps the easiest to begin with is Down the 
Center and Cut Away Six. The foot sometimes forgets to 
swing but you can trust all the rest of the set to protest 
until they get to swinging. And some of the couples will 
have trouble in realizing that a cut aioay four is cutting 
around two on each side, and a cut atvay two means to go 
around one on each side. But beginners catch it quickly, and 
they always like it. By far the most popular, perhaps be 
cause it is the simplest of all of the dances in this section, is 
the Waltz Quadrille. After you have done it a few times the 
sixteen repetitions may grow unbearably monotonous. But 
in this case I always let each couple (really each gentleman) 
go down the center twice instead of four times, and it all 



MORE SQUARES 121 

comes out even in the end, and cuts the dance exactly in 
half. 

There are many dances in the section where one lady or 
gentleman goes out that are very simple. For instance, One 
Little Buffalo out around the Ring is so easy as to be fool 
proof, and it has a lot of laughs in it. 

Once the group has done a dozen different dances they 
can try anything safely. Of course, such a dance as Wave 
the Ocean requires such a precision of timing that a general 
mixed group had better leave it alone or they will be mixed 
indeed. But any group that has worked together for any 
time at all can soon have it running smoothly, and their 
mastery of its timing will accentuate their pleasure in it. 

Endings and Beginnings 

There are only a few introductory figures current in 
the West, but it is well for the caller to have his group used 
to all of them, and to keep variety up by changing as often 
as possible. You will find them all in the second section of 
this manual Any introduction will serve as well as another 
for any dance, with very few exceptions, and the caller must 
always strive for variety. To keep the interest up he must 
make them follow the call, and never let them know what 
is coming next. If some wise set runs ahead of the call with 
too much overconfidence, he had better change the call sud 
denly and leave them hanging out on a limb. It is good 
discipline and good dancing. 

And so with the endings. In the second section you will 
find them all. Any ending can be used for any dance, and 
the caller should always use a different ending so the dancers 
will keep their ears pricked up for the call, and their interest 
on the alert. Only in the case of one or two dances is any 
particular ending more appropriate than any other. But 
in every other case scramble them joyously. 

In the ending : 

Siuing your opposite across the hall; 
Noio the lady on your right, etc. 

there is sometimes trouble on the first trial because the 
ladies, in their enthusiasm, cross over to meet the gentlemen, 
instead of standing still as they should, and waiting for the 
gentlemen to come to them. But the chief trouble comes from 



122 COWBOY DANCES 

the gentlemen not being able to tell which direction to go 
for the lady on the right. This is because some of them may 
be facing the center of the square when the call comes, in 
which case they will really get the right lady ; but those who 
have their backs to the center at the moment, of course, go 
in just the opposite direction and grab the wrong lady. It 
is easiest for the men to remember to move on in their 
regular promenade direction (which, of course, is a circle 
to the right), and take the next lady, in which case it makes 
no difference how they were facing when the call came. 

There are two endings which have an identical execution, 
but the calls are worded differently. 

Promenade in single file 

And just let me remind you 

To turn right back in the same old track 

And swing that girl behind you. 

This call usually comes after a swing, and all that must 
be remembered is to put the ladies down in front of the 
gentlemen before the single file promenade begins; then 
turning back (with a turn to the outside) the gentlemen 
swing each lady in turn and put each one down in front of 
them until after four promenades they get their own ladies 
again. 

Promenade in single file 

Lady in the lead in Indian style 

Turn right back and swing 'em awhile. 

From this call the dancers, of course, do exactly the same 
thing, repeating four times until they meet their own part 
ners. But my dancers always take this call literally and on 
the words "in Indian style" they all crouch in war-dance tra 
dition, and with their hands over their mouths, give a series 
of war whoops. It makes a pleasant variation, and the 
dancers seem to enjoy it. So I always alternate these two 
calls while doing the series of four repetitions, and it seems 
to work out better that way. 



Chapter 6 
r 

s 



Types 

of 
Dances 



rpHERE were four distinct types of dances in the old 
J- American dance program. They were the square dances, 
such as the quadrille; the longways dances, such as the Vir 
ginia Reel; the round dance, such as the Polka and Waltz; 
and the circle dances, such as the Cicillian Circle or Soldiers' 
Joy. In our Western dances, only the modified square and a 
few of the round dances managed to survive. I hear refer 
ences to the old circle dances done here forty years ago, but 
I have never seen one on a modern program in the West. 
Only the Circle Two-Step has carried on, and this is so 
simplified that it has little in common with the fine old- 
time circle forms. 

Also, the splendid longways dances such as Speed the 
Plough, Lady of the Lake, Hull's Victory, Pop Goes the 
Weasel, Money Musk, etc., are only names in this part of 
the country, or revivals in some of the schools. At one old 
Western dance I attended the caller announced "Pop Goes 
the Weasel." I was delighted and got my young people out on 
the floor and all lined up for a good longways dance. But no 
one else lined up. They stood about the floor in couples, and 
as the fiddler started the familiar tune they all took a regular 
dance position and began to two-step. 

Which of the old verses do you remember? Is it 

'Round and 'round the cobbler's bench 
The monkey chased the weasel. 
The monkey thought 'twas all in fun 
When pop goes the weasel. 

Whichever verse you do remember, you recall that the fourth 
line is always "Pop goes the weasel." And when the music 
reached that line, each gentleman turned his lady under his 



124 COWBOY DANCES 

left arm (pushed her under, if you will, with the right hand 
that had been around her waist), and she flew away from 
him to her full arm's length. At the end of the rope, the 
extreme limit of their holds, he gave a mighty jerk so that 
she flew through the air and almost flattened herself against 
his chest. If she was still conscious, they started two-step 
ping again with a high hop and a joyous abandon until the 
music directed him to "pop" her again. It was funny and 
full of laughs. Any hilarious group will find it amusing for 
a few times. But it is a sad descent from the old dance of 
the same name. 

But you will say that the Virginia Reel still survives. No, 
I have never seen it with the country folk. It has strangely 
survived in schools and in society groups as the only ex 
ample they know of the longways dance. I say strangely 
because I do not consider it nearly as fine or as much fun as 
many of the others. And my young people almost refuse 
to dance it, they have become so tired of it since they have 
been called upon to demonstrate and to teach it so often. 
However, I am sure your group of beginners will want to 
dance it largely because they feel somewhat on familiar 
ground. And you should encourage them. My only sugges 
tion is to break up the dance from the long double line it is 
usually danced in to the old traditional grouping of many 
shorter lines. It is best to have only six couples in a reel set, 
the gentlemen in one line and the ladies in the other, and 
as many of these short sets arranged crossways of the hall as 
the space will permit. Then it does not take so unbearably 
long to get through the dance once. In fact, with only six 
or eight couples in each set, we usually cut its time in half 
by having the first two couples form a bridge (after they 
have marched around and come together) and all the other 
couples passing under. This gives a complete new set of 
corners. Otherwise, the head couple becomes the foot couple 
on the second repetition, and they have a second turn on the 
corners with all the saluting and turning and dos-a~dosing to 
repeat. To be sure, in this shortened form only every other 
couple gets to reel down through the set. But they won't 
notice this if you don't tell them. 

If you have many short sets for the Virginia Reel cross- 
ways of the hall, it is almost necessary to call the dance. It 
not only helps the beginners when they get on a corner and 
have to lead, but it keeps all the sets together and saves a lot 



TYPES OF DANCES 125 

of confusion on the floor. If a set gets through reeling 
before the others, it, of course, waits for the call before 
going on with the dance, and soon they will all be working 
together at the same tempo. 

I have shortened the call and modified it to the present 
form as best suiting my purposes. I assume that everyone 
is sufficiently familiar with the dance so that detailed direc 
tions are unnecessary. 

Head lady salute the foot gent. 

Opposite corners salute. 

Head lady turn the foot gent with the right 

hand 'round. 

Opposite corners turn ivith the right. 
Head lady turn with the left. 
Opposite corners turn with the left. 
Head lady turn with both hands 'round. 
Opposite corners turn ivith both. 
Head lady dos-a-dos (or back to back) . 
Opposite corners dos-a-dos. 
Head couple join hands 
Down the center and back. 
Now hook right elboivs 
And turn once and a half around. 
Now reel through the set. 

(That is, alternately hook right elbows with your partner 
and left elbows with the next person in line, the lady, of 
course, turning the gentlemen, and the gentleman turning 
the ladies, until you have reached the foot of the set.) 

Head couple swing each other 
And march back to the head. 
Cast off and lead the lines around. 

(That is, the gentleman leads the gentlemen, and the 
lady leads the ladies, marching down the outside of the lines 
until partners meet at the foot and either join hands to form 
a bridge, or join hands and pass under.) 

First two couples join hands in a bridge 
And the rest pass under. 
Separate your two lines. 

(Repeat as many times as necessary.) 



126 COWBOY DANCES 

The chief trouble, as I said, with the Virginia Reel is the 
monotonous repetition and waiting" for your turn on the 
corners. This can be obviated by a new form of the dance 
which is gradually growing in favor. In this form, instead 
of having corners bow, turn, etc., each gentleman, and all 
at once, crosses directly over and does all the moves with his 
own partner. Done carelessly, this leads to wild confusion 
(but fun). However, if the line of men all advance as a 
straight line, the ladies the same, and all return to places 
in straight lines it can be very effective. And everyone is 
active all the time up to the point when the head couple reels 
the set. 

Of course, the call must be modified to : 

Each gentleman salute the opposite lady. 
Now turn her around with the right hand round, 
etc, 

or some similar call of your own improvisation. 

If you would like a complete description of the Virginia 
Reel and of most of the other old American longways dances 
I can refer you to no better text than Elizabeth BurchenaPs 
American Country Dances published by Schirmer. It not 
only has complete directions and music but diagrams which 
make everything clear. 

Some of these old dances are also described in Ford's 
Good Morning, which also contains descriptions of the circle 
dances and the best descriptions I know of a large variety of 
round dances. But its chief value is for the New England 
Quadrilles and Lancers. To anyone who is taking up Ameri 
can dancing it is quite invaluable. 

In our Western dancing we find a few New England 
dances with a sung call still surviving. And I think this call, 
which was sung, unquestionably had a great influence on the 
patter used by the Western caller. In the West where they 
had to do the best they could with whatever they had, it was 
inevitable that the fiddlers would be unfamiliar with some 
special tune and would have to substitute another, thereby 
killing the song, or the caller had forgotten the exact words 
and a patter grew up quite naturally, and the Western dance 
evolved as quite a distinct form* 

There were several different types or patterns of dance 
that grew up in the West. And it would probably pay to dis- 



TYPES OF DANCES 127 

cuss each type briefly. Before doing this we should mention 
one other New England contribution that became trans 
planted in the Western dance. There are two figures that 
regularly recur in the old New England dances. They are 
found over and over again in the Quadrilles, Longways 
dances, and Circle dances. They are the right and left 
through and the ladies chain. While they do not very often 
occur in the Western dance, the ladies chain being especially 
rare, they do merit a description; and, once learned, your 
group can widen the variety of its dances. Ford's Novelty 
Two-Step, for instance becomes great fun with a group who 
are familiar with these two simple figures. 

In the right and left through two couples advance to each 
other, each lady, of course, being on the right side of her 
gentleman. Each dancer gives his right hand to the oppo 
site (who, of course, is of the opposite sex as well) and 
passes beyond the two couples passing through each other. 
Each 'gentleman then takes his lady's left hand in his left 
hand, and putting his right hand behind her waist, turns her 
around him to the left while he stands as a pivot. Then the 
two couples pass through each other again, giving opposites 
right hands as they do so. Then giving left hands to part 
ners, the gentlemen again turn the ladies to place. Right 
hands to opposites and left hands to partners give it the 
name right and left through. Experts usually leave out the 
handshake, but beginners find it a help. This means that 
the dancers pass each other on the left side. Incidentally, in 
all passing, whether individuals, couples, or long lines, it is 
customary to pass on the left side of your opposite instead 
of on the right side as we are accustomed to do in modern 
American traffic. The old English custom of passing on the 
left prevails in our dancing as it still survives in modern 
London traffic. Perhaps it carries the roots of our dances 
back to the time when armed men passing in narrow lanes 
kept their sword arms toward each other for safety's sake 
and passed on the left. 

In the ladies chain two couples face each other. Each 
gentleman passes his lady toward the other lady. The two 
ladies take right hands in passing each other and then give 
their left hands to the left hands of the opposite gentlemen. 
The gentlemen put their right hands behind the ladies' 
waists and turn them completely around to the left as they 
themselves pivot in position. Each gentleman now passes 







1. Two couples advance to each other. 




2, And taking ri&ht hands with opposite^ pass through each other. 

RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH 




3. Partners now rejoin their left hands and 




4. Each lady pivots around her partner to the left 

RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH 




M 

I. 



5, They advance to each other again taking right hands with opposites. 




6. Pass through each other. Then joining left hands as above (in 
Fig. 3) will pivot left to place. 

RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH 



TYPES OF DANCES 13 i 

his lady toward the other. The two ladies take right hands 
and pass again, giving their left hands to their partners 
this time, who again pivot and turn them to place. It is 
more graceful if the lady, when she gives her left hand to 
the gentleman, places her right hand well back on her hip, 
palm outward, so as to receive the gentleman's right hand 
when he turns her around. 

When either of these figures is encountered I think it 
adds pleasure to the dance to recognize it as of the purest 
New England ancestry. And yet the ladies chain is so rare 
in the West that its commonest form modifies it from a two 
ladies chain to a three ladies chain in the dance of that name, 
and even sends the ladies chaining for the full length of the 
hall at times, giving right hands to each other and left hands 
to the fixed line of gentlemen, who stand dizzily pivoting 
to the left and passing the ladies on interminably. 

Types of Western Squares 

There are several distinct patterns or types of Western 
dances. If you understand the essential structure of each 
type you will fit any new call into its type immediately and 
only have to become acquainted with the variation. And so 
I believe it will pay to discuss the types in order that the 
whole general architecture of the dance may be kept in mind. 

The Docey-Doe Type 

The docey-doe type is perhaps the most typical form of 
the Western dance. The docey-doe serves as a subchorus, the 
grand right and left as the grand chorus. After an intro 
duction, the first couple goes to the second, executes a special 
figure and a docey-doe, goes on to the third couple and does 
the same figure and the docey-doe, then on to the fourth, re 
peating the figure and the docey-doe, then balances home and 
they all do the allemande left and grand right and left, pre 
ceded usually with a swing, and ending always with a 
promenade to place. Then the second couple goes around 
the ring visiting each other couple in turn, third, fourth, and 
first, and does the figure and docey-doe with each and back 
home to join with all in the grand right and left. Then it is 
all repeated with the third couple visiting around the ring, 
then repeated for the fourth couple, and after the last grand 
right and left and last promenade the dance is over. 




1. The ladies of two couples exchange places, taking right hands in 

passing. 




l*^f^^ 

2. They give their left hands to the opposite gentlemen and encircle 

them. 



LADIES CHAIN 




3. They pass back to their own partners, again touching right hands. 




4. They give their left hands to their own partners. 

LADIES CHAIN 





5. The gentlemen put their right hands behind the ladies* backs. 




6, And turn them around to place. 

INDIES CHAIN 



TYPES OF DANCES 135 

Variety may be added by using a variant of the grand 
right and left, or by using some other ending such as Swing 
your opposite across the hall Good dancers sometimes add 
variety without the caller's help by letting the second couple 
do the figure and doceij-doe with the third couple at the 
same time the first couple goes on to the fourth. This puts 
the whole set in action at once instead of having two couples 
standing inactive. Less often, and only with very expert 
dancers and very energetic ones, the whole set keeps in 
action all of the time. The third couple jumps out to the 
fourth and dances the figure with them while the first 
couple dances with the second. But the third must finish 
in time and be back home ready to receive the first when 
they- advance to meet them. The fourth couple in the mean 
time swing more or less to the center of the set ready for the 
second couple, who advances to them and does the figure with 
them while the first and third are in action together. It is 
now the turn of the fourth to hurry and make sure they are 
home in time for the oncoming first. For, after all, the 
dance really belongs to the first couple, it is called for them, 
and the other couples must be in place to receive them when 
the caller sends them on. As the first and fourth do the 
figure the second meets the third with the same. Then they 
all balance home for the grand right and left. And so on 
through the four repetitions of the dance, they all keep 
active all of the time. Unless they are experts and sure of 
their timing, it only makes for confusion and sloppiness; 
even with experts there must be agreement as to who is the 
active couple, or it will lead to collisions. Of course, the 
first is active all three times, and perhaps it is best for the 
others to follow the order of third, fourth, and second 
couples being active each in turn on the off couple's figures. 
But any agreement as to this that any group arrives at will 
be satisfactory so long as it is an agreement that is always 
understood. 

Sometimes the caller directs this double action, speeds 
things up, and shortens the dance with a call second couple 
follow up. After the first couple has danced with the second 
couple and then with the third couple in the regular manner 
the caller says, "On to the next and the second follow up." 
The first couple then advances to the fourth and at the same 
time the second couple advances to the third, and the two 
groups of four are in action at the same time. Then on the 



136 COWBOY DANCES 

call, "On to the next/' the first couple goes back to their own 
position and remains there (since they have completed the 
circuit of the set) and the second couple advances to the 
fourth and dances with them. Then the caller says, "On to 
the next and the third follow up." The second couple now 
dances with the first couple, and the third couple at the same 
time dances w r ith the fourth. In this way each couple goes 
around the set overlapping with the proceeding couple and 
stopping at their own home position and waiting for the 
couples behind them to catch up. As soon as the opportunity 
offers the fourth folloiv up and by the time the fourth couple 
gets back home, all will have been around the set. Thus 
three grand right and lefts will have been omitted, and they 
will all join now in a final right and left. It sounds compli 
cated, but works out easily. Each couple follows up as soon 
as there is a couple free for them to dance with. In the 
figure it works out that all four couples are busy, then only 
two couples, then four again and so on alternately. It makes 
the dance more interesting and much shorter when called in 
this way. 

Split-the-Ring Type 

There are several dances built on a pattern in which the 
first couple goes down the center and splits the ring, the 
lady goes right and the gent goes left. In practically all of 
these dances, after the introduction, they begin by having: 

The first couple balance; 
The first couple swing, 
And down the center f 
And split the ring. 

Aside from the direction balance home in which most 
dancers simply go home (though by rights they should bal 
ance even here) balance always means to step backward four 
steps and then forward four steps in our type of Western 
dance. So, if the first couple balances they face each other 
and each backs up four steps, then they come together four 
steps, and swing in the regular way. Then they march down 
the center and pass between the third couple and separate, 
the lady going around the outside of the ring to the right and 
the gentleman to the left, ready to do anything that the call 
directs them to do. 



TYPES OF DANCES 137 

In most of the dances of this type whatever the figure 
may be, the man promenades with the corner girl, that is, 
with the girl on the left, and takes her to his home position. 
This means that each lady progresses one gentleman to the 
right each time. Thus, the first lady progresses to the 
position of the second couple, the second lady to the third, 
and so on. Usually the call continues the same old gent 
(that is, still the first gent) and a brand new girl (that is, 
the fourth girl) down the center and away they whirl, and 
they repeat the dance by splitting the ring and each circling 
around. The next time it is the same gentleman and still a 
new girl. On the fourth repetition the first gentleman finds 
his lady has progressed to the fourth position, and is now his 
cdrner girl, so he promenades with her and has her back 
home. Then usually a left allemonde and right and left 
grand is used as a general chorus before the second couple 
is called out for the dance, and it all repeats itself. 

Sometimes this is accomplished by each dancer executing 
a figure with the corner and being then directed to finish 
by promenading with the corner, which makes it all very 
simple to put the ladies through their progression. But 
more often the figure is done with the partner and then 
comes the call all run away with the corner girl, when each 
gentleman goes to the corner lady and leads her around the 
promenade to his home position. When the figure is exe 
cuted with the corner, it is often followed with the call : 

Allemande left just one, 

And promenade the girl you swung. 

This means that each man does an allemande left with the 
girl on his left and then returns to the corner girl with whom 
he just did the figure (the girl he swung), and promenades 
with her, thus effecting the necessary progression. This pro 
gression must be remembered as the essential feature of 
most of these split the ring dances. 

In the Waltz Quadrille, an old favorite, we find a varia 
tion when the lady returns back center after the first couple 
has passed through the third couple ; that is, she passes back 
through them again instead of circling around to the right, 
but the gentleman stays outside and circles in the regular 
manner. He meets her at their original position, but she 
has taken a short cut. 



138 COWBOY DANCES 

Symmetrical Type 

This is a type of dance in which each couple does the 
same figure at the same time, giving a complete symmetry to 
the set. It is at its best in such dances as Four Gents Lead 
out to the Right of the Ring and Ladies to the Center and 
Back to the Bar. And in most of the dances of this type 
there is the same progression of ladies or gentlemen around 
the ring, so each will have a new partner for the four repe 
titions of the dance. This progression is achieved in one of 
the three ways described in the preceding section. 

Another type of symmetrical dance starts with : 

The first and third couple 
Forward and back. 

(This is suggestive of the New England Quadrille.) After 
taking four steps toward each other and four steps back and 
away from each other, the first and third couples move into 
a position that puts all four couples in action and in 
symmetry. 

The Single Visitor Type 

There are a few dances in which a single lady or a single 
gentleman visits around the ring, doing some figure with 
each couple or one dancer of each couple in turn. Usually 
this type of dance borrows its patterns from the Kentucky 
Running Set, and the single lady is followed by each of 
the other ladies in turn until they are all going around the 
ring, or the lady is followed by her partner. In one dance, 
The Pokey Nine, even the caller jumps into the set, or some 
ninth dancer comes in from the wall, and follows around 
always with the odd couple until the dance is completed. 
And in Take Her Right Along the gentleman leads his lady 
out to the second couple, but leaves her there and takes the 
second lady on to leave her with the third gentleman while 
.he takes that lady on, and so on until, after twelve swaps 
and twelve swings, he has his own lady back home. 

The characteristic, then, of this type of dance is for one 
or more dancers individually to visit around the ring. 

Promenade the Outside Ring 

There are a few dances in which the first couple starts 
the dance by promenading the outside ring, or the inside ring 



TYPES OF DANCES 139 

as the caller may direct. Then the dance can take any of 
several directions. In fact, these directions are so various 
that the dance may move into a sort of symmetry or take 
almost any form, and so I doubt whether this is a true type, 
although we often loosely call it a type. 

For instance, in one case, after the first couple prome 
nades the outside ring the lady goes half way 'round again 
(and by so doing gives the name to the dance) . This leaves 
her in a line of three with the third couple, and leaves her 
gentleman standing alone. He now becomes a single visitor 
and swings each lady in turn making the dance distinctly 
of the single visitor type. 

We will find the first dance of the next section The Grand 
March Change, which distinctly belongs in that section, 
starting with the Promenade the inside ring, so I doubt if 
this is a true type at all. 

Intermingling Type 

Some of our finest dances are here, but since all the sets 
intermingle with each other in one long line they are not 
dances for beginners. They are, however, packed with 
fun for those advanced enough to execute them. The Grand 
March Change is perhaps the best liked of all of them. If 
all your sets are arranged in one line down a narrow hall, 
the first couple of each set promenades the inside ring and 
faces the wall, that is, faces outward from the set and 
toward the head of the hall. The second couples then prom 
enade and fall in behind them, the ends (or third couples 
who are already facing the head of the hall) move up be 
hind them, and the sides (or the fourth couple) move into 
line behind the thirds. All the dancers on the floor are now 
in one double column, and the old-fashioned grand march is 
done by ones, twos, fours, and eights. To be sure, if your hall 
is wide and you have too many sets to form in one line down 
the middle of the hall, you may have to form a line down 
either side. In this ca$e you will have two double columns 
facing the head of the hall. And each column will have to 
execute its own grand march without intermingling with 
the other, and by staying always on its own half of the floor. 

After many possible variations of the Grand March you 
end with an eight by eight, or a column eight, and each set, 
of course, forms one of these groups of eight abreast. Now, 



140 COWBOY DANCES 

if they are directed to circle eight, the two end dancers of 
each eight circle around and take hands so as to form a 
closed ring, and a swing and a promenade will put them all 
back in regular position on the floor as the sets were at the 
beginning of the dance. Or you can slip in as many com 
plicated figures as you like before you promenade them to 
their home positions. 

The other dances of this intermingling type can be 
danced either entirely within each set as a unit or inter 
mingling with other sets for the length of the hall. Perhaps 
it will be best to get a picture of their structure within a 
single unit before complicating them with too much 
intermingling. 

The essential pattern is achieved by moving the first 
couple to the second and calling for a four and a half, which 
means for them to join hands and circle four half way 
around. This leaves the first couple facing the center of the 
set, the second couple with their backs to the center and 
beyond them the fourth couple. This puts three couples in 
a row. If the first couple, with some such figure as a right 
and left through or an arch, passes through the second, they 
are facing the fourth. Now as they pass through the fourth 
with the same figure, the second couple can be turning 
around and again face the center of the set. The fourth, 
having passed through, is now in the middle facing the 
second. The fourth passes through the second while the 
first turns around, now leaving the second and first facing 
each other for another pass through. And so they could go 
on, shuttling back and forth forever. 

Now, if there were another set, the two sets could shuttle 
across the hall with six couples passing through each other 
alternately, in which case each couple must remember to go 
clear to each wall and back before they are home and all 
straightened out. Or if the second couple leads out to the 
third on the first repetition of the dance, second, third, and 
first couples are in line in each set, and if there are many 
sets on the floor each couple can pass through to the ends 
of the hall and back. 

If a half dozen sets intermingle in line to the two ends 
of the hall and back it will prove quite enough, and the odd 
couples will simply have to stand and await their turns. In 
a single set we often call only four passes, which leaves the 
active couple in the center, and the side couples each stand- 



TYPES OF DANCES 141 

ing in the other's place on the wrong sides of the set. The 
active couple now circles four with the odd couple ok, and 
around and around with a docey-doe, which tends to pacify 
this odd couple, before the active couple goes on to the right 
with another four and a half, putting the three couples again 
in line. Now four more passes will put each couple back in 
its own place, the active couple in the center, and as soon 
as they balance home, a left allemande and a grand right and 
left can finish off that quarter of the dance, but with many 
sets intermingling the odd couple awaits their turn. 

Irregular Types 

There are a few dances that seem to fit into no classifi 
cation or type. Sometimes you may have two that are alike 
enough to make a type, but two are hardly enough to merit 
a title. ^ For instance, in the Figure Eight the dancers join 
hands in a line and parade around in single file. In the 
Grapevine Twist they do the same, turning in and out 
through each other as they march. But this is hardly 
enough to justify a type in our classification. 

Therefore, in the second part of this book, where the 
calls are given, I shall lump all of these dances together 
in one irregular section. And there are some mighty fine 
dances to be found here. These dances are only irregular 
in the sense that they fit in no regular classification. 

Now and then we do find a completely irregular dance, so 
irregular that it seems impossible. One night I was dancing 
with the Old Town Friendly Club (Old Town being the 
familiar name for Colorado City, the first territorial capitol 
of Colorado). A strange little man who had been dancing 
with us, though no one had ever seen him before, announced 
that he was a caller and asked permission to call a square. 
The whole party blew up when he called the first couple 
out to the left. There was not a person there who had ever 
seen the first couple go left, or what they called "back 
wards." But he stoutly insisted that as many dances went 
left as right, so they tried his dance. I wrote down the call 
which was as follows : 

First couple out to the left 

And face the wall. 

Put on style and back to the hall, 



142 COWBOY DANCES 

And swing a little while. 
Four hands 'round 
And gents patter down. 

But he couldn't make them understand what he wanted. 
On his gents patter down he insisted on a back-handed 
docey-doe which he called an Allemande left with four. 
Some of our old dancers had danced in squares for over 
sixty years, but they could make nothing out of his call. 
After their first try and hopeless confusion they stood 
laughing at him, and he went home in a huff, so very 
irregular that he could fit nowhere in our scheme of things. 

Original Dances 

Surely it is obvious that every dance in existence had to 
be done a first time by someone. Some, to be sure, are modi 
fications of older dances, but each modification also had to 
be done for the first time. In dancing especially is it true 
that "there is nothing new under the sun." The arrange 
ment of old elements in each dance, and its pattern, was 
original sometime with someone somewhere. Only the dead 
tree ceases to put out shoots. Surely it is a sign of vitality 
for each caller to experiment a little with some new call or 
new arrangement. I have only had time to do a little of this, 
but I simply could not help inventing a few new dances of my 
own, borrowing from European folk-dance figures, or from 
any figure that I thought might be used. 

I have put a few of these original calls as my very last sec 
tion. I have not separated them for distinction or for apology, 
but as a challenge to other groups to make their own. Since 
many readers will want to be able to distinguish the old and 
traditional from the new and brash, it seems only fair to 
admit that these are not old traditional dances of the West 
ern pioneers. They are simply experiments on the old square 
frame done for pure fun, 

Exhibition Dancing 

If your group should become familiar with many of the 
old dances they are pretty sure to be called upon to exhibit 
them somewhere. If they do, there is one last suggestion that 
I should like to make. Keep them alive and up to tempo, and 
avoid as many repetitions as possible. 



TYPES OF DANCES 143 

When many sets are dancing by themselves for the pure 
enjoyment of the dance (the only real justification, after 
all) they may prefer a slow and easy tempo. And they will, 
of course, want to do each dance completely, each couple tak 
ing its turn at leading each figure. But this is deadly to 
watch. The first time through is interesting; the second 
repetition may help you in your better understanding of the 
figure, but the third and fourth repetitions drag until from 
an audience's point of view they are almost unbearable. 
And if, as often happens in a contest, some other set uses 
the same call and drags through it all again for four more 
times, it is almost beyond audience endurance. 

Often at a contest the judges are old dancers themselves, 
and they somehow feel that it isn't a real dance unless it 
repeats itself through the full four times, and in loyalty to 
the past they will sit through it even if it kills them. But 
I believe and have often urged, without much avail, that if 
each couple were called out on a brand-new call it would 
not only give the variety of four different changes but would 
be a much better test of the ability of both the caller and the 
dancers. The w r eight of tradition says, "No !" However, 
when you are exhibiting you wish to make the thing you 
exhibit as attractive as possible. There is no one to say you 
nay, and I feel you should speed it up and give as many 
samples of the square dance as your time will permit. A 
few old-timers, with a loyalty to their past, may object, but 
I believe even they will enjoy the program more in spite of 
(or perhaps because of) their objections. 

Indeed, a group of young dancers in a private dance of 
their own enjoy and even beg for a change of call for 
each couple, even when there is no audience. I believe that it 
is good to indulge them now and then. It takes four times as 
much memory and four times as much ingenuity to carry a 
whole evening through that way, but the caller's job is to 
give the very maximum of enjoyment to the group he has 
before him on the floor. 

Little Children 

One last word ! Please do not teach these dances to little 
children. Grade-school pupils may enjoy them but it will 
mark the dances forever in your community with the stigma 
of "kid stuff." Well-meaning gymnasium teachers have 



144 COWBOY DANCES 

taught the splendid circle folk dances of the peasants of 
Europe to girls' gymnasium classes and to little children, 
until folk dancing is popularly thought of as "sissy stuff," 
and most manly chaps will have nothing to do with it with 
out a deal of tactful educating. 

Not only are the dances so vigorous and manly and 
strenuous that they are quite unsuited for girls' classes or 
children but they will thus be killed for everyone. If, in your 
community, you can start the dances with the manliest and 
most popular young fellows, with older men mixing in, the 
program will become a great joy. But if you see any well- 
meaning woman trying to teach them to children or to 
classes of girls, please rush to the nearest court and get out 
an injunction to keep her from robbing the adult public of a 
precious sport that really belongs to it. Also, the children 
who are incapable of getting more than half the fun out of 
them, will be robbing themselves of those adult pleasures 
which they have a right to when they grow up, and which 
they themselves will have destroyed as children. Even when 
you organize an adult group you may find children a prob 
lem. Some women whose husbands cannot or will not dance 
with them, will bring small sons, who can hardly reach to 
the waists of the partners they will have to swing. And 
small daughters will beg to come and make the dance equally 
impossible for the men. To be sure a full set of children 
would do no harm at all at an adult dance, unless they tried 
to take more than their share of the attention or of space; 
in fact, the old-time dances were community affairs. Chil 
dren would form sets off in the corners and become quite 
expert. The whole family would be there. When I am in 
vited to an old-time dance in this year of our Lord, I always 
know it's the real thing, if I see a few baskets on chairs 
around the edge of the hall with tiny babies sleeping in them, 
oblivious to all the noise and fun their parents are making. 
But that is an entirely different kettle of fish 'from making 
these adult dances into a "child activity program." 



Part 
II 

The 
Calls 



r 



J 
V. 



The 
Framework 



Introductions 

EACH square dance opens with an introductory figure. 
There are several standard introductions. Any one of 
these can be substituted for any other according to the 
fancy of the caller ; in fact, he should use enough different 
introductions during the evening to assure variety. 

There are also many different standard ways of calling 
the "grand chorus/' or ending, for each section of the dance. 
These endings likewise should be shuffled and changed and 
chosen for the sake of variety. 

The docey-doe "call" or the "subchorus" also has many 
variations, especially in the patter which fills it out. A good 
caller should make use of all these variations, shifting and 
changing them to suit his own fancy and to please his crowd. 

For each of these dances given in the next section, there 
is given a standard introduction and a standard ending, 
chosen more or less at random. This will help the beginner 
and give him a complete call, as it will help the literary 
dilettante who may also want an example of a complete call. 
But for those given an experienced caller must substitute 
introductions and endings of his own choice. 

In the following pages we have assembled some of these 
framework elements of the dance, so he will have them all 
in one place and be able more easily to make his choice and 
his own substitutions. In fact, he should get them all so 
well in mind that their use is instinctive. 

See page 56 for description of square position. Each 
term will be described fully the first time it is used in this 
section. Refer back or turn to the glossary if the same term 
is used later without explanation. 



148 COWBOY DANCES 

A flourish! 

Used sometimes instead of "All set" or "Ready now" 
before the dance figure begins. 

Everybody in your places, 
Straighten up your faces, 
Loosen up your belly-bands 
Tighten up your traces 
For another long pull. 

In Colorado I have always heard this given without the 
third line. But in Arizona this third line proved the favorite. 

(1) INTRODUCTION: 

Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left. 

Break and swing and promenade back. 

(Explanation: The call is always for the men, with the 
ladies doing the complementary step. Therefore, the men 
bow to their partners, on their right, then to the ladies on 
their left. Then all eight join hands and circle around to 
the left until the call break. They then take a modified dance 
position (almost face to face with the man's right arm 
around the lady's waist, his left hand extended and sup 
porting her right hand, and her left hand resting on his 
shoulder. It is best for them to stand a little off center with 
right hip against right hip.) They swing around or pivot 
twice to the right (in the direction each is facing). They 
then take the promenade position (side by side with the lady 
to the right and with hands grasped, right in right and left 
in left, and the man's right arm crossed over the lady's left) 
and in this position march back (counterclockwise) to their 
original positions, ready for the main part of the dance. 

See pages 58-62 for more complete discussion and for 
illustrations. 

(2) INTRODUCTION: 

Salute your company and the lady on the left, 
All join paddies and circle to the left, 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

(A variant in call of the same introductory figure de 
scribed above.) 



THE FRAMEWORK 149 

(3) INTRODUCTION: 

Salute partners, salute corners, 
Join hands and circle 'round, 
Swing 'em hard and trot 'em home. 

(A shorter variant of the same introductory figure.) 

(4) INTRODUCTION: 

All jump up and never come down, 
Swing your honey around and around, 
'Till the holloio of your foot makes a hole 

in the ground. 
And promenade, oh promenade! 

(Explanation: With a "holler" all jump as high as they 
can. As they come down each couple takes the modified dance 
position and spins dizzily until the call directs them to take 
the promenade position. They then promenade once around 
the circle to the right, counterclockwise, and back to their 
own places.) 

(5) INTRODUCTION: 

One foot up and the other foot doivn, 
Grab your honey in your arms 
And turn her around, 
And allemande left as you come down. 
Now promenade your honey round. 

(Explanation: Usually danced as in No. 3 with a jump 
into the air and then a vigorous swing with your partner. 
But sometimes it is danced literally by partners facing each 
other (or all facing center) and each raising the right knee 
as high as possible, in an exaggerated loosening-up exercise 
and then the left knee as high and the partners swing. Then 
each man turns to the lady on the left, and taking left hands 
with her turns once full around her and back to his partner 
with whom he promenades around the square and back to 
his own position.) 



150 COWBOY DANCES 

(6) INTRODUCTION: 

One foot up and the other foot down, 
Grab your little sage hens and swing 'em 

around. 

Left allemande and a right hand grand, 
And promenade, oh promenade. 

(Sometimes "little heifers" is substituted for "little sage 
hens/') 

(Explanation: This is the same as JNo, 4, except that 
after the left allemande, when each man turns the left hand 
girl with the left hand he gives his right hand to his partner, 
and each passes by to the next, to whom they give a left 
hand, then the next with the right, etc., moving in a ser 
pentine, all men circling to the right or counterclockwise and 
all the ladies circling to the left or clockwise. This, of course, 
is the grand right and left. When partners meet they take 
the promenade position and continue in the man's direction 
(counterclockwise) back to their places.) 

See pages 47-53 for more complete discussion and illus 
trations of the allemande. 

(7) INTRODUCTION: 

Up and down and around and around, 
Allemande left and allemande aye, 
Ingo bingo, six penny high, 
Big pig, little pig, root hog or die. 

(Explanation: Danced exactly the same as No. 6, but 
put up in a more fancy and colorful call, which was first 
given to me by an officer on the Denver police force who had 
remembered it from his boyhood.) 

(8) INTRODUCTION: 

Everybody swing his prettiest gal. 
Left allemande and a right hand grand, 
And promenade, boys, promenade, 

(Explanation: The same as No. 6 but without the pre 
liminary jump or raised knee, it starts right in with the 
swing.) 



THE FRAMEWORK 151 

(9) INTRODUCTION: 

All eight balance, all eight swing. 
A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade eight 
'Til you come straight. 

(Explanation: Partners face each other, and each steps 
back four steps, then forward four steps and then they 
swing. From the swing it finishes exactly as No. 6.) 

(10) INTRODUCTION: 

Siving your partners don't be late. 
Noiv swing on the corner like swingin* on 

the gate. 
Noiv your own and promenade eight. 

(Explanation: Each gentleman swings his partner 
twice around, then he turns to the lady on his left, "his 
corner," and swings her twice around. Then he swings his 
partner again and promenades with her around the set and 
back to his own place.) 

(11) INTRODUCTION: 

Everybody swing his prettiest gal 
And promenade, boys, promenade. 

(Explanation: Each gentleman takes his partner in 
regular dance position and swings her twice around. He then 
promenades with her around the set in a counterclockwise 
direction and back to place.) 

Endings* 

Used as a grand chorus after each couple has gone all around with 

a change. 

(1) ENDING: 

S'wing, swing, everybody swing! 

(Explanation: Usually used to precede most of the 
following endings, but occasionally used alone, without even 
a promenade.) 



Note* Quite often endings and introductions are used inter 
changeably. One may be substituted for the other. 



152 COWBOY DANCES 

Allemande Group 

(2) ENDING: 

Swing the left hand lady ivith your left hand, 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

(Explanation: The simplest ending call for beginners 
since it specifically explains the "allemande" without using 
the word. Each gentleman takes the left hand lady's left 
hand in his own left hand and walks completely around 
her and back to place. This leaves partners now facing each 
other. They take right hands and pass each other giving 
left hands to the next lady or gentleman and so on around 
alternately right and left in a serpentine, the men moving 
counterclockwise, the column of women clockwise, until 
they meet their partners with whom they promenade (con 
tinuing in the men's direction or to the right) until they 
get back to their own positions. 

See pages 47-53 for more complete discussion and for 
illustrations of the allemande. 

(3) ENDING: 

Allemande left with your left hand, 

Right hand to partner, 

And right and left grand. 

Promenade eight when you come straight. 

(Explanation: The commoner call and executed exactly 
the same as No. 2.) 

(4) ENDING: 

Swing your partners all around, 
Allemande left as you come doivn, 
Grand right and left and so on around, 
Right foot up and left foot doivn, 
Make that big foot jar the ground, 
Now promenade your honey 'round. 

(Explanation: No. 1 and No. 2 combined into one call 
which is expanded with "patter" to time more exactly. 
Execution same as No. 2 but with a preliminary swing.) 



THE FRAMEWORK 153 

(5) ENDING: 

AUemande left, oh a left hand swing, 
Grand right and left around the ring, 
Hand over hand ivith the dear little thing. 
Promenade, boys, promenade. 

(Explanation: Same as No. 2.) 

(6) ENDING: 

Left AUemande, and a right hand grand, 
Plant your 'taters in a sandy land, 
And promenade home! 

(Explanation : Same as No. 2.) 

(7) ENDING: 

AUemande left 

And grand right and left. 

Meet your partner and turn right back. 

(Explanation : Same as No. 2, except that when partners 
meet in the grand right and left they take right hands and 
turn completely around each oth6r, so they are facing in the 
opposite directions. Then they do a right and left in reverse 
direction until they meet their partners. They then prome 
nade in the regular direction.,) 

(This "turn right back" can be used with any right and 
left ending. It is sometimes called Meet your partner and 
take the back track.) 

(8) ENDING: 

AUemande ho, Right hand up, 
Around we go! 
Promenade! 

(Explanation: The same as No. 2 but reduced to the 
shortest call I have heard for this common ending.) 

(9) ENDING: 

Balance home and swing 'em all 'round, 
AUemande left as you come down, 
Grand right and left, and so on around. 
Meet your honey and promenade. 



154 COWBOY DANCES 

(Explanation: The same as No. 2 but preceded by a 
balance and swing, that is, the partners step back from each 
other four steps, then together and swing.) 

(10) ENDING: 

All eight balance and all eight swing. 

A left allemande 

And a right hand grand, 

Meet your partner 

And promenade eight 

'Til you come straight. 

(Explanation: Same as No. 9.) 

(11) ENDING: 

Balance home and swing 'em all night, 
Allemande left go left and right. 
Oh some'll go right and some'll go le-e-e-ft. 
Now promenade. 

(Explanation: Same as No. 9. The caller usually drags 
out the final "left" in a long nasal chant.) 

(12) ENDING: 

Balance home and siving 'em all day, 
Allemande left in the same old way; 
Hand over hand and right and left grand, 
Oh, some'll go right and some'll go le-e-ft. 
Now promenade. 

(Explanation: Same as No. 9 or No. 11.) 

(13) ENDING: 

Siving on the corner, and have some fun, 
Allemande left with the one you swung. 
Right hand to partner and trot right along. 

(Explanation: Each gentleman first swings the corner 
girl (his left hand girl) then does an allemande left with 
her, then a grand right and left.) 



THE FRAMEWORK 155 

(14) ENDING: 

Swing on the corner like s win gin' on a gate. 
Now your own if it ain't too late. 
Note allemande left with your left hand, 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 

(Explanation: Each gentleman first swings his corner 
lady, then he swings his partner, and then proceeds as in 
No. 2.) 

(15) ENDING: 

Now you're home and all eight swing, 

Swing on the corners, 

Swing your own. 

Swing the opposite, 

Now your own. 

Left allemande, a right hand grand. 

Meet your partner and promenade. 

(Explanation: After partners swing, each gentleman 
swings his left hand lady, and then his partner again. He 
now crosses the set and swings the lady of the opposite 
couple, and then back to swing his partner again. Then 
finishes by executing the same as ending No. 2.) 

(16) ENDING: 

Swing your opposite across the hall, 
Now the lady on your right, 
Noiv your opposite across the hall, 
Now your own and promenade all 

(Explanation: In this ending the ladies stand in posi 
tion and wait for the men to come to them. When all four 
men cross the set to their opposites at one time it makes a 
traffic jam in the center. If they all touch right hands as 
they pass each other, it makes a neat figure. But they 
usually prefer to collide and make a knot of it. 

Each gentleman crosses the set and swings the opposite 
lady. He then goes to the next lady around the set in a 
promenade direction and swings her, that is his right hand 
lady when he is facing the center of the set. He then crosses 
again to the opposite lady from her and after swinging her, 



156 COWBOY DANCES 

he returns to his partner, swings her and they all promenade. 
The second line is sometimes called "Now your right hand 
ladies all." 

This is a common and delightful ending. To make it 
clearer let us illustrate for the first gentleman. He swings 
the third lady, then the fourth, then the second, and then 
his own.) 

(17) ENDING: 

Swing your opposite across the hall, 
Noiv siving your corners, 
Now your partners, 
And promenade all, 

(Explanation: A shorter version of No. 16 in which the 
gentlemen only cross the set once. By corners the gentle 
men's original corners are meant, not the new corner count 
ing from the opposite; that is, the first gentleman, for in 
stance, swings the third lady, then the fourth lady and then 
his own.) 

(18) ENDING: 

Balance one and balance all. 
Swing your opposite across the hall. 
Now your own if she ain't too small. 
And promenade, boys, promenade. 

(Explanation: After a preliminary balance, this is a 
yet shorter version of No. 16, in which the gentleman swings 
the opposite lady and then right back to his partner. It 
sometimes ends with an allemande left and right and left 
grand before the promenade. The third line is sometimes 
called Now your own if you're not too tall.) 

(19) ENDING: 

Noiv siving your opposite across the hall, 
You haven't swung her since last fall. 
Now trot home and swing your own, 
And thank your stars the bird ain't flown. 
Now promenade. 

(Explanation: The same as No. 18 but with a little 
patter to fill out the call.) 



THE FRAMEWORK 157 

(20) ENDING: 

Hurry up, boys, and dorit be sloiv, 
Meet your pard' ivith a double elbow. 

(Explanation: This is an additional call, only given 
when they are finishing the grand right and left of any of the 
preceding calls. It adds a more complicated figure. 

As each gentleman meets his partner, instead of prome 
nading, they hook right elbows and swing around to the 
right for two counts, then hook left elbows and go to the 
left for four counts, usually with a high springing step. 
Each man then advances to the next girl and hooks right 
elbows with her and then left elbows. .Then to the next 
lady whom he. "double elbows" and so .on back to his own 
lady with whom he promenades. 

To count it carefully and keep everyone together in their 
changes it is necessary to allow two extra counts, one while 
changing from the right elbow to the left elbow with each 
girl and the other while changing from one girl to the next. 
The count then becomes one, two, change (elbows) , one, two, 
three, four, change (girls). Once this pattern is established 
it is easier to do it all to the count of eight for each girl. 

In some communities they count four with the right 
elbow, four with the left elbow, two for the change. This 
unfortunately gets the whole count off of the four bar basis. 
It is sometimes called : 

Change your pards and don't be slow, 
Swing 'em all with the double elbow. 

(21) ENDING: 

Watch your honey and watch her close, 
Treat your honey to a double dose! 
Swing 'em high and swing 'em loiv. 
Keep on sivingin' that calico! 
Right foot up and left foot doivn, 
Whirligig, Whirligig, Whirligig 'round! 
Rope your cow and brand your calf, 
Swing your honey an hour and a half! 
Here I come with the old mess wagon, 
Hind wheel broke and the axle draggin'. 
Meet your honey and pat 'er on the head, 
If she don't like biscuit give her cornbread! 
Promenade, boys, promenade! 



158 COWBOY DANCES 

(Explanation: Just the same as No. 20 but with con 
tinuous patter to fill out the call. In No. 20 the caller has to 
stay quiet for a long while as the double elbow is being 
done. This call gives him something to amuse himself with.) 



(22) ENDING: 

It's once and a half, boys, 

Meet your partner and once and a half. 

Sold my cow and wealed my calf. 

Swing the reel with a once and a half! 

Winnow the wheat and blow the chaff. 

And swing the next one once and a half! 

Make 'em chuckle and make 'em laugh, 

Swing the next one a half and the other half too. 

When you meet your pard, you know ivhat to do! 

It's promenade, boys, promenade! 

(Explanation: Since this usually follows a grand right 
and left the first line is a warning line, and the second line 
starts the swing. There is enough patter to fill in most of 
the dance. 

This dancfc must never be danced as in No. 21, the double 
elbow, although unfortunately and all too often it is care 
lessly so danced. A once and a half, which is a common fig 
ure in European folk dances, must be the origin of the dance, 
and the call has retained the phrase, but too often it is exe 
cuted incorrectly as a double elbow. In a true once and a 
half which we should do for this call each gentleman swings 
his girl with his right elbow, completely around once and 
then continues for another half, which puts him beyond her. 
(That is, if he stands facing a girl, he hooks elbows, and 
swings her once around he will be back just where he 
started from. But if he continues a half swing more, he will 
be on the other side of her.) He then goes on to the next girl 
and hooks left elbows with her, swings once and a half and 
advances to the next. He hooks rights with her and swings 
once and a half with her, then on to the next with his left 
elbow. It is really grand right and left done without a re 
verse, swinging each girl once and a half around, the first 
girl entirely with the right elbow, the second girl only with 
the left, the next girl with the right, and the last one with 



THE FRAMEWORK 159 

the left. The next to last line of the call Sioing her the half 
and the other half too indicates to me, alas, that it is all too 
often done as a double elbow. But it shouldn't be. 

(23) ENDING: 

Promenade in single file, 

And just let me remind you, 

To turn right back on the same old track 

And swing that girl behind you. 

(Explanation : The entire group promenades around the 
set in single file, with each lady preceding her partner. On 
the call turn right back each gentleman turns around (right 
face or toward the outside of the circle) and swings the girl 
behind him, twice around. He then puts her down in front 
of him and they promenade in single file again. Thus each 
time he turns back and swings a new girl. This call has to 
be repeated three times (four times in all) until each 
gentleman gets his own lady back. The caller usually then 
adds : 

Promenade to places now. 

and they all promenade in couples back to their own 
positions. 

A slight variant of this call that is sometimes heard is : 

Noiv single promenade with the lady in the lead. 
Turn right back in the very same track, 
And swing that girl behind you. 

(24) ENDING: 

Promenade in single file 

Lady in the lead and Indian style, 

Turn right back and siving 'em aivhile. 

(Explanation: The same as No. 23 except on the word 
'Indian style" the dancers usually crouch and with hands 
over mouths give an Indian war whoop.) 

A variant of this call is : 

Break that circle ivith the lady in the lead, 

Single file, Indian style, 

Stop and swing her once in a while. 



160 COWBOY DANCES 

Finish Phrases 

At the end of the first "tip," when the first dance is 
finished and the dancers remain in their sets ready for the 
second tip, you may hear such phrases as the following : 

1) Swing your honey, 
And there you stand, 

2) There you stand! 

3) That' sit! 

4) You're done! 

When the second "tip" is finished and the dancers are 
to return to their seats the following finish phrases may 
be heard : 

1) Keno! Promenade to your seats! 

2) Promenade! You know where and I don't care, 
Take your honey to a nice soft chair! 

3) Lead her out and give her air! 

4) Meet your partner and promenade there. 
Take your honey to a rocking chair! 

5) Hurry up girls and don't be slow, 
Kiss that caller before you go! 

Docey-Doe Calls 

All docey-does are essentially the same in execution, but 
a great variety of calls can be used, especially in the way of 
nonsensical patter, which fills in while the figure is being 
executed. In the following variants no notes will be given 
if the execution is standard. 

(1) 

Circle four and docey-doe. 

(Explanation: Two couples join hands in a circle of 
four with each lady on the right side of her partner and 
opposite the other lady. The four circle to the left or 
clockwise. Each gentleman then passes his lady's left hand 
from his right hand to his left, in such a way that at the 
moment of break she passes beyond the opposite lady or 



THE FRAMEWORK 161 

between the opposite couple. She now makes a left turn, 
taking his left hand with her left hand. And the two 
gentlemen remain facing each other, while each passes his 
lady behind him (letting go her hand as soon as necessary) 
and reaches out with his right hand and takes the opposite 
lady, who is coming around from behind the opposite man, 
by her right hand, and without turning away from facing 
the opposite man, passes her around behind him. He now 
reaches out with his left hand and takes his partner, who has 
just passed around the opposite gentleman, by her left hand. 
Still holding her left hand in his left, he puts his right hand 
behind her waist and turns her to whatever new position the 
dance calls for. For a complete discussion of the docey-doe 
see page 108.) 

(2) 

Four hands up and here we go, 
. Around and around and a docey~doe. 

(Explanation for this and the following variations of the 
call is the same as No. 1.) 

(3) 

Docey-doe ivith the gent you knoio, 
Ladies go C and the gents go doe! 

(4) 

Four hands round, and round you go. 
The ladies go C and the gents go doe! 

(5) 

Four hands round. 
Gents patter doivn, 
Ladies step out f 
And go to town. 

(6) 

Four hands up and around you go, 
Docey ladies and gents solo, 

(7) 

Four hands up and around we go, 
Ladies docey docey-doe! 

< 8 > 

Break amd circle four in a ring, 

With a docey-doe and a docey-ding! 



162 COWBOY DANCES 

(9) 

Four hands up and here we go 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 
Doe and a dough and a little more dough, 
Chicken in a bread-tray pickin' up the dough, 
One more change and on we go. 

(10) 

Circle four ladies doe and the gents say "no." 
Chicken in a bread-tray pickin' up the dough, 
Some use a shovel and some grab a hoe, 
One more change and on we go. 

(11) 

Four hands up and here we go, 

Around and around and a docey-doe. 

Hurry up boys and don't be slow, 

You'll never get to heaven if you don't do so. 

One more change and on you go. 

(or the last two lines are sometimes heard) 

You'll never kiss your uncle if you don't do so. 
One more change and home you go. 

(12) 

Circle four in the middle of the floor, 
Half ivay round as you did before. 
Ladies doe and the gents you know, 
Hurry up boys and roll your dough! 

(13) 

Docey lady and docey gent, 

Docey lady and on yo^(, went, 

Docey lady and a docey-doe, 

Docey lady and on you go! 
(14) 

The ladies doe and the gents you knoiv, 

By gosh! You ought to know, 

With a million doses of docey-doe. 

One more change and on you go! 
(15) 

Up the river and around the bend, 

Four hands half and goin' again. 

Ladies doe and the gents you know. 

One more change and home you go! 



THE FRAMEWORK 163 

(Though I have often heard this call, the first line of its 
patter seems contradictory to the figure. And I have an 
uncorroborated feeling that up the river and around the 
bend was a southern phrase for the allemande left.) 

(16) 

Ladies doe and the gents you know, 
Four hands up and around you go! 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 

(In older groups when a docey-doe call begins this way, 
the two ladies do a dos-a-dos or back to back, each lady ad 
vancing to the opposite, passing right shoulders, stepping 
sideways back to back, and still facing the same direction 
walk backward to place (passing left shoulders in going 
back) . The two men then do a dos-a-dos. And then they all 
circle four and do the standard docey-doe described above.) 

(17) 

Circle four 

And swing your opposite with your right, 

Noiv your partner with the left, 

And on to the next, 

(This simpler call is sometimes substituted for the 
docey-doe with a group of beginners. You will note that it 
is actually the last half of the docey-doe and does not begin 
by the gentlemen passing the partner from right to left 
hand and around behind, then to the left, but takes up the 
figure from that point. Incidentally some groups do this 
twice, in place of a docey-doe. See page 117.) 

(18) 

Four hands half, 

A right and left thru, 

And on to the next. 

(This is sometimes heard as a substitute for the docey- 
doe. The two couples join hands and circle left halfway 
around. The two couples then pass between each other, 
with the ladies passing between the opposite couple, and 
the gentlemen on the outside. Each gentleman should give 
his right hand to the opposite lady as he passes through, 
then take his partner's left hand in his left and with his 
right hand around her waist lead her to the next position.) 



164 COWBOY DANCES 

(19) 

Circle four, 
Now ladies chain. 
And chain right back! 
On to the next. . 

(Another substitute that is sometimes used for the 
docey-doe to add variety to a dance. After circling, each 
lady takes the opposite lady by the right hand, passes her 
and gives her left to the opposite man, circles him, and 
crosses again giving her right to the opposite lady, and then 
her left to her partner who turns her around and leads her 
on to the next figure.) 

(20) 

Circle four, 

Ladies change with the right hand cross, 

Now back ivith the right to the same old hoss! 

(Same figure as No. 19.) 



Docey- 

Doe 
Group 



In which each couple visits around the set, doing a 
simple change and then a docey-doe with 
each couple they visit. See page 108 for 
a discussion of the docey-doe, and 
the pages immediately preced 
ing for a variety of calls 
for this figure. 



EXPLANATION OF DIAGRAMS 




unr 



fNTLEMAN 




The squares represent the gentlemen (think of square shoulders) 
and the circles represent the ladies (think of curves). The letter S 
shows the position of the swing, 

When there is more than one swing, they are numbered with sub 
scripts to show the order of the swings. Occasionally the tracks of 
action are also numbered to show the order in which they are followed. 

Dotted and solid lines have no significance except to keep different 
tracks from being confused with each other, 

The portion of the action which a diagram represents is indicated 
by the letters under it "B" and "C" would indicate that it represents 
that section of the call numbered "b" and "c." 

The number in the circle or the square indicates whether it is the 
first, second, third, or fourth lady or gentleman, 

By noting the crook or bend of the arm in some diagrams you 
can determine which direction a figure is facing, 



STAR BY THE RIGHT 

Star by the Right 



167 



(A very simple dance for beginners, In which only the last half of 
the docey-doe is used.) 

THE CALL: 

1, Honors right and honors left; 

All join hands and circle to the left; 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple out 

To the couple on the right. 

b) Form a star with the right hand cross 

c) Back with the left and don't get lost. 

d) Swing your opposite with your right; 

e) Now your partner with your left, 

f ) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written beginning with (b) 
Repeat again, changing last line to : 

g) Balance home. 




3. And everybody swing 

Now swing the left hand lady 
With your left hand. 




Back with the left and don't get lost. 



168 STAR BY THE RIGHT 

Right hand to partner 

And right and left grand. 

Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions, or substitute any other intro 
duction described there. 

2. a) First couple join hands and walk to second couple. 

b) All four turn left face and join right hands held high 
and inarch around for four steps, still holding hands. 

c) Break holds, and each does a rightabout-face, and 
they all join left hands and march back. 

d) Break holds; first gentleman takes second lady by the 
right hand and swings her around behind him and 
releases hold. Second gentleman does the same thing 
with the first lady. 

e) Each gentleman takes partner by left hand and swings 
her around behind him to place, 

f ) First gentleman takes partner's left hand in his right 
and advances to the third couple, being sure his part 
ner is on the right side when he faces the new couple 
with whom they repeat b through /. On next repeti 
tion he advances to the fourth couple. 

g) After the last repetition he walks back to place with 
his partner, and all four couples do a balance by sep 
arating four steps then coming together again. 

3. See page 152 for directions or substitute any other ending 
described there. 



VARIATIONS : 

The figures (b) and (c) are sometimes called as follows: 
1) Star by the right 
And how do you do? 
Back with the left, 
And how are you? 



STAR BY THE RIGHT 169 

or 2) Form a four hand cross 
And how do you do? 
Now cross with your left, 
And how are you? 

These variations can be alternated with the regular call 
in repetitions of the figure. Or sometimes a caller will make 
up a long string of variations such as : 

Star by the right; did you get a letter? 
Back with the left; yeh, the folks are better. 

o o o 

Star by the right; and how are you hittin'? 
Back with the left; let's do some sitting 

50 O $ 

Star by the right; its warmish weather. 
Back with the left; keep stompin' leather. 



VARIATION: Right Hand Back to the Lady's Left 

This very simple dance can be made fun for experienced 
dancers by using the following substitution for d), e), and 

*) 

Right hand back to the lady left, 

Break with the left and pull her through, 

Shuffle along with the old choo-choo, 

Now you're doing the docey-doe, 

A little bit of heel and a little bit of toe, 

One more change and on you go. 

But don't attempt this until you are familiar with the 
movements of the docey-doe in the dances that follow. Then 
you will find that if the gentlemen put their right hands back 
over their left shoulders and join right hands with this lady 
on the left, while still continuing with left-hand star, they 
will instinctively pull the lady through and around behind 
them when they break with their left hands. Thus your lady 
also will have passed through and will now be coming around 
from behind your opposite, and if you take her with the left 
hand and behind you, you will find you are now starting a 
regular docey-doe. And it's very good fun. 



170 LADY ROUND THE LADY 

Lady Round the Lady 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left. 
All join hands and circle to the 

left. 

Break and swing and promenade 
back. 

2. a) First couple out 

To the couple on the right. 

b) The lady round the lady 

c) And the gent so loiv. 

d) The lady round the gent 

e) And the gent don't go. 

f ) Four hands up and here we go 
'Round and around and a docey-doe. 

g) On to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with (b) 
Repeat again changing last line to : 

h) Balance home. 





Lady round the lady and the gent so low. 



LADY ROUND THE LADY 171 

And everybody swing 
Noiv allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade! 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire three more times (for second, 
third, and fourth couples). 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction described there. 

2. a) First couple join nearest hands and advance to second 

couple. 

b) The first lady passes between second couple (who 
must separate a few steps) and walks to the left 
around the second lady either still holding her part- 
near's hand or independently of him. 

c) The first gentleman follows her around the second 
lady one step behind her. 

d) The first lady passes between the second couple again 
and turning right encircles the second gentleman ; that 
is, she completes a figure eight around the second 
gentleman. 

e) The first gentleman does not follow but stands facing 
the second gentleman with the second lady on his left 
hand. 

f ) Finishing her circle, the first lady comes between the 
first and second gentlemen, and all four join hands 
and circle to the left. 

See page 160 for directions for docey-doe or sub 
stitute any other of its call variations. 

g) First couple advances to the third couple, the lady 
slightly in advance and repeats (b) to (g) . On the 
next repetition they advance to the fourth couple and 
repeat (b) to (g). After the last repetition: 

h) They return to their own position in the square, and 
all four couples balance. 

3. See page 152 for directions, or substitute any other ending 
found there. 



172 



TWO GENTS SWING WITH THE ELBOW SWING 




Two Gents Swing with the Elbow Swing 

THE CALL: 

1. All jump up and never come down, 
Siving your honey around and 

around, 

'Til the hollow of your foot 
Makes a hole in the ground, 
And promenade, boys, promenade! 

2. a) First couple out to the right. 

b) Two gents swing with the elbow swing. 

c) Now opposite partners elbow swing, 

d) And now two gents with the same old thing, 

e) And now your partners elbow swing. 

f ) Noiv circle four, oh, circle four 

And docey-doe with the gent you know. 
The ladies go si and the gents go do. 

g) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing the last line to : 
Balance home. 




Two gents swing with the elbow swing* 



TWO GENTS SWING WITH THE ELBOW SWING 173 

And everybody swing. 

Now swing your opposite across the hall, 

Noio the lady on your right, 

Now your opposite across the hall, 

And now your oicn, 

And promenade all! 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) The two gentlemen hook right elbows and swing 
around once and a half. 

c) Each gentleman hooks left elbows with the opposite 
lady (first gentleman with second lady and second 
gentleman with first lady) and swings once around. 

d) Two gentlemen again hook right elbows and swing 
once and a half around. 

e) Each gentleman hooks left elbows with his partner 
and swings her once around. He releases her so that 
she is standing on his right as he faces the opposite 
gentleman. 

f) See page 160 for directions for docey-doe or for pos 
sible substitute calls. 

g) First couple with the lady on the right advances to 
the third couple and repeats from (b). On the next 
repetition they advance to fourth couple and repeat 
from (b) and finish by returning to their places in 
the square, where each couple balances. 

3. See page 155 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



174 



STEP RIGHT UP AND SWING HER AWHILE 



Step Right Up and Swing Her Awhile 



5 







) 







THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing his prettiest gal, 
And promenade, boys, promenade! 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right 

b) And honors all! 

c) Step right back and watch her smile 
Step right up and swing her awhile. 




Step right back and watch *@m grin. 



STEP RIGHT UP AND SWING HER AWHILE 175 

d) Step right back and watch 'em grin 
Grab your own and swing her again. 

e) Four hands up and here we go 
'Round and around and a docey-doe. 

f ) On to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 

3. And swing 'em all day. 

Allemande left in the same old way. 

Now hand over hand with the dear little things. 

Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Note: (See page 234 for longer and commoner ar 
rangement of what is apparently the same call.) 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction described there. 

2. a) First couple joins near hands and advances to second 

couple. 

b) First gentleman and second lady bow deeply to each 
other while the first lady and second gentleman bow, 

c) Each gentleman steps back a few steps from the lady 
to whom he bowed, advances again, and swings her 
twice around in regular dance position, and puts her 
down on his right as he faces the opposite gentleman, 

d) Each gentleman now faces his partner, steps back a 
few steps, advances again and swings her, and puts 
her down on his right. 

e) See page 160 for directions or substitute other calls 
for docey-doe. 

f ) First couple, with lady on the right, advances to third 
couple and repeats from (b). They next repeat with 
the fourth couple and then return to places in square. 

3. See page 154 for directions or substitute any other ending 
described there. 



176 



I'LL SWING YOUR GIRL; YOU SWING MINE 



I'll Swing Your Girl; You Swing Mine 






THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left. 

All join hands and circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right. 

b) I'll swing your girl; you swing mine. 
By golly! Ain't that fine! 

c) You swing your girl; I'll swing mine, 
I'll swing my girl every time. 

d) Four hands up and here we go 
'Round and around and a docey-doe. 




Til swing your girl, you swing mine. 



I'LL SWING YOUR GIRL; YOU SWING MINE 177 

e) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with (b). 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 

3. And siting 'em all night. 
Allemande left, 
Go left and right. 
Some'll go right 

And some'll go le-e-eft! (With a long drawl.) 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions, or substitute any other intro 
duction described there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) First gentleman, taking regular dance position, 
swings second lady, and the second gentleman swings 
first lady, putting them down to the right. 

c) Each gentleman swings his own partner and puts her 
down on his right. 

d) See page 160 for directions and for variations of the 
docey-doe call. 

e) First couple with lady on the right advances to third 
couple and repeats from (b). Then they advance to 
fourth couple, and repeat from (b). Then they re 
turn to their places in the square and all four couples 
balance. 

3. See page 154 for directions, or substitute any other end 
ing found there. 

Note : Some of the variations of this call, especially the 
last couplet, are : 

Your gal's pretty, so is mine, 

Til swing my gal every time. 
Or 

An even swap, an even trade, 

Your pretty gal for my old maid. 

(or vice versa) 
Or simply 

Opposites swing, 

Partners swing 



178 



SWING AT THE WALL 



Swing at the Wall 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade 
back. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on 

the right, 

b) Around that couple 
And siving at the wall. 

c) Through that couple 
And siving in the halL 

d) Circle four, oh, circle four. 
Docey-doe with the gent you know. 
The lady goes si and the gent goes do. 

e) And on to the next, 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with (b). 
Repeat again and change last line to : 
Balance home. 

3. And everybody siving. 
A left allemande 

And a right hand grand. 

Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 





Through that couple and swing in the hall 



SWING AT THE WALL 179 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) The first couple separates and passes around the sec 
ond couple, lady to the right and gentleman to the 
left. They meet beyond the second couple and, taking 
a regular dance position, swing twice around. 

c) The second couple separates by taking a step back 
ward from each other, and the first couple passes 
between them. It is best for the second couple to take 
a step or two in the opposite direction (toward the 
outside of the square) so they pass around the first 
couple while the first passes between them. Each 
gentleman takes his own partner in dance position 
and both couples swing. 

d) See page 160 for directions or for possible variations 
of the call. 

e), First couple passes on to the third couple and repeats 
from (b). Then they go on and repeat with the fourth 
couple and finally return to their places, when each 
couple does a balance. 

3. See page 153 for directions, or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
couples. 



t II I 



180 GO ROUND AND THROUGH 

Go Round and Through 

(Very similar to the preceding dance.) 

THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing his prettiest gal, /"""~~7^ 
And promenade, boys, promenade! / ,'-r*^ 

I j x-K \ 

2. a) First couple out to the right. / ^ ( 

b) Go round and through \ ^ 
And the center couple siting. \ \ 

c) Go through and around \^ 
And both couples swing. 

d) Four hands up, around we go, 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 

e) Then on to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 

3. Balance one and balance all! 
Swing your opposite across the hall. 
Now your oum if she's not too small. 
And promenade, boys, promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



(b). 




Go through and around and both couples swing. 



GO ROUND AND THROUGH 181 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction found there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) First couple separates and passes around outside of 
second couple, meet each other, and pass back between 
second couple (second couple taking what steps are 
necessary to make this easier). First couple swings 
twice around in regular dance position. 

c) First couple now passes between second couple, sepa 
rates, and returns to place by passing around and out 
side second couple (second couple by a few steps in 
either direction making this as easy as possible). 
Each gentleman takes partner in dance position and 
swings her twice around. 

d) See page 160 for directions or variations, 

e) First couple passes on to third couple and repeats 
from (b), next time to fourth couple, and then back 
to own position. 

3. See page 156 for descriptions or substitute any ending 
given there, 

O O. 

Very similar to the previous dance, this call is heard 
much less frequently. 



182 



THE GALL: 



HIM AND HER 

Him and Her 



1. Everybody swing his prettiest gal, 
And promenade, 

2. a) First couple out to the right. 

b) The lady round the lady 
And the gent around the gent. 

c) The gent around the lady 
And the lady round the gent. 

d) Circle four and docey-doe. 

e) On to the next. 

b) The her around the her 
And the him around the him. 

c) The him around the her 
And the her around the him, 

d) Circle four and docey-doe. 

e) And on to the next. 

b) The she around the she 
And the he around the he. 

c) The he around the she 
And the she around the he. 





The gent around the lady, and the lady round the gent. 



HIM AND HER 183 

d) Circle four and a docey-doe. 
g) And balance home, 

3. And everybody swing. 
Now allemande ho! 
Right hand up and here we go! 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) The first lady a little in advance of the first gentleman 
passes between the opposite couple and encircles the 
lady. The gentleman follows her between the opposite 
couple, but he encircles the gentleman. 

c) The first lady still in advance passes between the 
second couple again and encircles the gentleman. The 
first gentleman follows her through the opposite 
couple but encircles the second lady. (They each do 
a figure eight in the opposite direction from the 
other.) 

d) See page 160 for directions and a longer call for the 
docey-doe. 

e) The first couple advances to the third. 
f ) The first couple advances to the fourth. 

g) The first couple returns to own position in the square 
and all couples balance. 

3. See page 153 for directions or substitute any ending given 
there. 



There are many variations for this call, such as the fol 
lowing : 

The shoe around the shoe 
And the boot around the boot. 
The boot around the shoe 
And the shoe around the boot. 



184 



THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME 



Or 

The sheep around the sheep 
And the goat around the goat. 
The goat around the sheep 
And the sheep around the goat. 

The possibilities are endless. 

In the dance as given the first couple goes through and 
around the opposites. It is sometimes called in reverse order, 
in which case they go around and through the opposites, and 
on the last time through, the first lady crosses over in front 
of the first gentleman in order to be in the right position for 
the docey-doe. This is a little more awkward than the regu 
lar arrangement in which the crossover comes at the be 
ginning. The call in reverse would be : 

The gent around the lady 
And the lady 'round the gent. 
The lady Around the lady 
And the gent around the gent. 



The Girl I Left Behind Me 





N 




A 

/ 1 




FlIUT 4IAL-F 5FCOWD 4jALf- 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left. 
Break and siving and promenade back. 



THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME 185 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right; 

b) Pass right through and balance too 
And swing that girl behind you. 

c) Pass right back on the same old track 
And siving that girl behind you. 

d) Noiv four hands up and here we go 
Around and around and a doceij-doe. 

e) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written, beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 

3. And everybody swing. 

Noiv promenade in single file 

And just let me remind you 

To turn right back in the same old track 

And siving that girl behind you. 

Repeat 3 three more times, or until each gentleman 
swings his own partner again. 

All promenade to places now. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 




Promenade in single file. 



186 THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME 

Some callers so time this call that they manage to insert 
the line: 

Swing that girl, that pretty little girl, 
Oh, swing that girl behind you. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitute any introduction 
given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) Who separate so that the first couple can pass between 
them. Each dancer balances by taking a step back 
ward and making a deep bow to his partner, and then 
turns back to face the opposite. The first gentleman 
swings the second lady and the second gentleman 
swings the first lady. 

c) The first gentleman and second lady now pass between 
the second gentleman and the first lady. Each of these 
pairs bow and turn and each gentleman then swings 
his own partner. 

d) See page 160 for directions or for variations of this 
call. 

e) First couple advances to third couple and repeats 
from (b) ; next to fourth couple; and at last return 
to places. 

3. See page 159 for directions and for other calls of this 
type which can be alternated in the repetitions if desired. 



BIRDIE IN A CAGE 

Birdie in a Cage 



187 



THE CALL: 



1. Up and down and around and around, 
Allemande left and allemande aye. 
Ingo, bingo, six penny high, 

Big pig, little pig, root hog or die. 

2. a) First couple a balance-siring, 

Lead right out to the right of the 
ring 

b) With a birdie in a cage 
And three hands round. 

c) The bird hop out and the crow hop in. 

d) The crow hop out and circle again. 

e) Docey-doe 'with the gent you know. 
Ladies go si and the gents go do. 

f ) On to the next 

Repeat 2 as written beginning with (b) 
Repeat again, changing last line to : 

Balance home. 





With a birdie in a cage and three hands round. 



188 BIRDIE IN A CAGE 

3. Swing, s icing, and swing 'em high. 
Allemande left and allemande aye, 
Ingo, bingo, six penny high, 
Big pig, little pig, root hog or die. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 
This is sometimes called : 

The bird hop out and the crow hop in, 
All join paddies and go around again, 
The croiv hop out and circle four. 
Docey-doe, etc. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 for directions or substitute any introduction 
given there. 

2. a) First lady and gentleman step backwards from each 

other for four steps, then forward and take regular 
dance position and swing twice around. They then 
advance to second couple. 

b) First lady steps to the middle of the ring formed by 
the first gentleman and the second couple who join 
hands. As the three circle to the left, she turns to the 
right. 

c) The first lady steps out of the ring and takes the first 
gentleman's place as he steps in to the middle. The 
new three circle left while he turns to the right. 

d) The first gentleman steps out and takes his place in 
the ring between the two ladies. All four continue 
circling to the left. 

e) See page 160 for directions. 

f ) First couple go on and repeat the figure with the third 
couple, then with the fourth couple, and return to 
their original place in the square. 

3. See page 150 for directions or substitute any other ending. 
The one used is listed as an introduction, but serves just 
as well as an ending. 



THE LADY WALKS ROUND 

The Lady Walks Round 



189 



THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left. 

All join hands and circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade 
home. 



2. a) First couple balance and siving. 
Lead right out to the right of the 
ring, 

b) Turn a three hand set 
And the lady ballonet. 

c) Go four hands round 
And round you go. 

The ladies go si and the gents go do, 

d) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 as written beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing last line to : 

Noiv balance home. 





Turn a three hand set and the lady ballonet. 



190 THE LADY WALKS ROUND 

3. And everybody siting, 

Allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet your partner and turn right hack, 
Meet her again and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 
Ballonet is pronounced to rhyme with set. 



THE EXPLANATION : 

1. See page 148 for directions, or substitute any introduction 
given there. 

2. a) First couple each step back from one another four 

steps, then together and swing. They then advance to 
the second couple. 

b) The first gentleman and the second couple take hands 
and circle left, while the first lady walks around them 
to the right. The second time her partner passes her 
she steps into the ring on his right and they circle 
four. 

c) See page 160 for directions and a longer call if desired. 

d) They advance to the third couple and repeat, then 
to the fourth, and return home. 

3. See page 153 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



VARIATION: 

Where a Southern influence enters the following substi 
tute is heard for b) : 

Three hands round and the lady go seek, 
Swing your partners when you meet. 



THE DOLLAR WHIRL 

The Dollar Whirl 



191 








-HALF 

THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing his prettiest gal 
And promenade. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right, 

b) Change and swing with the quarter ivhirL 

c) Change again and swing her the half. 

d) Change again and swing her six bits. 

e) Change again swing the dollar whirl. 

f ) Four hands up and around we go, 
'Round and around and a docey-doe. 

g) On to the next 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing last line to: 
Balance home. 




Change again and swing her six bits. 



192 THE'DOLLAR WHIRL 

3. And everybody swing. 

Now allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) First and second gentlemen each take the opposite 
lady and swing her half around, that is, each ex 
changes places with her. (The swing can either be in 
dance position or a two-handed swing.) 

c) Each gentleman takes his own partner and swings 
once full around with her, each returning to his own 
position. 

d) Each gentleman again takes the opposite lady and 
swings with her once and a half around, again chang 
ing positions with her. 

e) Each gentleman takes his partner again and swings 
twice around with her, and putting her down to his 
right, they all join hands in a circle of four. The 
gentleman always returns to his own place when 
swinging his partners. He always changes places with 
the opposite, since it is a one half swing and a once 
and a half swing.) 

f ) See page 160 for directions or for a longer call. 

g) First couple advances and repeats with the third 
couple, then with fourth, and returns to their home 
position. 

3. See page 152 for directions, or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



THE BUTTERFLY WHIRL 

The Butterfly Whirl 



193 



m 


2 < (a) * 2 


0y \ 


a 


V / 

^^^ 


1 1 V_,/ \!^ 
,'* ~~*^ 


*- x x 

r-^N 


s. 

,- > 


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THE CALL: 



1. AH y&wp up and never come down. 
Swing your honey around and around, 

'Til the hollow of your foot makes a hole in the ground, 
And promenade, oh, promenade! 

2. a) First couple out to the right 

And circle four. 

b) The two ladies ivhirl; 

c) The two gents ivhirl; 

d) And don't forget the Butterfly ivhirl 

e) Four hands up and around we go, 
The ladies go si and the gents go do. 




And don't forget the Butterfly whirl 



194 THE BUTTERFLY WHIRL 

f ) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b). 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 

3, And swing 'em all night, 

Allemande left, go left and right, 
Hand over hand around the ring. 
Hand over hand loith the dear little thing, 
Promenade eight when you come straight, 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 
This is sometimes called simply : 

Four hands up in a great big ring, 
Don't forget the Butterfly Swing. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple and joins hands 

with them and all circle to the left. 

b) All drop hands and the two ladies, with their hands at 
their sides, whirl in position once around to the right. 

c) The two gentlemen in the same manner whirl to the 
right while the ladies continue whirling. 

d) All four lift their hands above their heads, ostensibly 
like butterfly wings, and whirl twice more around to 
the right. 

e) All join hands again and circle to the left. For direc 
tions for the docey-doe see page 160. 

f ) First couple repeats with the third couple, then the 
fourth couple, and returns to place. 

3. See page 154 for directions, or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



This dance is usually introduced for a laugh. There is 
nothing to the dance, but it is silly enough to set everyone 
laughing. 



THE LADY ROUND TWO 

The Lady Round Two 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and left, ^^: 
All circle left /^C 
Couples swing and promenade to ,' (j> 

place. > 

i * 

i 

2. a) First couple balance-swing 

And lead right out to the right 
of the ring. 

b) The lady round two 

c) And the gent fall through, 

d) The gent around two, 

e) And the lady fall through, 

f ) Four hands up and here we go 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 

g) And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b). 
Repeat again changing last line to : 

And now go home. 



195 




The lady round two and the gent fall through, 



196 THE LADY ROUND TWO 

3. And swing 'em all day. 

Allemande left in the same old way. 
Now right and left grand around the ring, 
Hand over hand ^vith the dear little thing. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
couples. 

S $ 

Another form of the call for this figure is : 

First couple out to the couple on the right, 
Around that couple with the lady in the lead, 
The gent fall through and take the lead; 
The lady fall through and circle four. 
Docey-doe, etc. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitute any introduction 
found there. 

2. a) First couple separates four steps, each from the 

other, then they step together and swing. They then 
advance to the second couple with the lady slightly 
in the lead. 

b) The lady walks to the right of the second couple and 
circles around them to her left, and the first gentleman 
follows her. 

c) As the gentleman passes behind (or outside of) the 
second couple, he passes between them, cutting cor 
ners as it were, and is now in advance of his lady. 

d) He continues circling to the left and walks once more 
around the second couple. 

e) But as the first lady passes behind them she now drops 
between them, which puts her between the two gen 
tlemen ready for the docey-doe. 

f ) See page 160 for directions or for an alternate call. 

g) The first couple advance to the third couple, then the 
fourth couple, repeating 2 with each of them in turn, 
and then return to their place in the square. 

3. See page 154 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



DIVE FOR THE OYSTER 

Dive for the Oyster 



197 



THE CALL: 




1. All jump up and never come doivn, 
Sioing your honey around and 

around 
'Til the hollow of your foot maket 

a hole in the ground. 
And promenade, boys, promenade. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple 

on the right, 

b) And dive for the oyster. ^ , - , , , 

/ T-,. - /. , J ' One's go first and drag 

C) Dive for the dam, two's after them. Arrows 

d) Dive for the sardine^ indicate direction each 
And take a full can. dancer f aces 

e) Four hands up and here we go, 
'Round and around and a 

docey-doe. 

f ) And on to the next 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing last line to : 

Balance home. 




Dive for the oyster. 



198 DIVE FOR THE OYSTER 

3. And everybody swing. 

Now allemande left with your left hand, 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand, 

Promenade eight ichen you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 

couples. 



I am told there is a slight variation of this call which is 
heard on Cape Cod and goes : 

Dig for the oyster, 
Delve for the clam, 
Take them all home, 
In an old tin can. 

This is logical enough in a clam-digging country. But 
the call as I first heard it came from Arizona, where they 
have to dig through the canned goods in the commissary 
and take sardines perforce. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1, See page 149 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to the second couple, joins 

hands with them, and the four circle to the left. 

b) The first couple dives in under the raised arms of the 
second couple, and then steps back to place, all four 
still holding hands. 

d) The second couple dives in under the arms of the first 
couple and back to place, all four still holding hands. 

d) The first couple dives again under the arms of the 
second couple, this time passing through to the other 
side, all still holding hands. The first couple now raise 
their leading and joined hands and pass under this 
self-made arch in the old childhood figure, of "wring 
ing the dishrag." In passing under their own joined 
hands, each turns to the outside or away from his 
partner (the gentleman pivoting left and the lady 
pivoting right). They now pull the second couple 
through after them under their still raised hands. The 



DIVE FOR THE OYSTER 199 

second couple finds their outside and still join hands 
under which the first couple passes now above their 
other arms which have been pulled through and 
under. This pulls them face to face; then as the 
pulling arms continues it brings them shoulder to 
shoulder (the shoulders of the pulled arms, of course) 
then back to back. By this time they have been 
pulled through, and marvelous ! they too have "wrung 
a dishrag" and are back in the original circle of four. 

e) See page 160 for directions or substitute a longer call. 

f ) First couple advances to third couple and repeats with 
them. Then to fourth couple and finally back to place. 

3. See page 152 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



VARIATION: 

LITTLE BROWN JUG 

This figure can be complicated by substituting the 
following call; for b), c), d), and e) : 

Roll that jug along the floor, 
Keep on rolling and roll some more. 
Now roll it back, till your back gets sore, 
Keep on rolling, and couple up four. 
Now docey-doe with the gent you know, 
The lady goes see and the gent goes doe. 

In this case there is no preliminary diving under the 
arms and back, but the first couple go directly under the 
arched arms of the second couple and with a dishrag con 
tinue straight on until they have pulled the second couple 
through under their arms. The second couple now go back 
under the first couple's arms and with a dishrag continue 
until they have pulled the first back through to their original 
position. Then the four join hands, circle left, and do a 
docey-doe. 



200 



EIGHT HANDS OVER 

Eight Hands Over 




THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left, 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple out to the right 

b) And eight hands over. 

c) Ladies bow and the gents boiv under, 

d) Round you go and go like thunder, 

e) Break and circle four in a ring, 
Docey-doe and a docey-ding. 

f) On to the next 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b). 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 




Flap those girls and flap like thunder. 



EIGHT HANDS OVER 201 

And everybody swing. 

Allemande left ivith your left hand, 

Right to your partner and right and left grand, 

Promenade eight ivhen you come straight! 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 

couples. 



The last line of the figure is often called differently : 
Hug those girls and go like thunder! 

Or 

Hold your holds and go like thunder! 

Or 

Squeeze 'em tight and go like thunder! 

It is best, perhaps, to keep changing the last line, as you 
call, for the sake of variety. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 14'8 for directions or substitute any introduction 
given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) The two ladies join both hands across rights to lefts, 
and the two gentlemen likewise join their hands to 
gether over the ladies' hands. 

c) The two ladies bow low and pass in under the gentle 
men's joined arms which are raised and swung back 
so as to rest around the ladies' shoulders. The gentle 
men then bow and pass their heads under the ladies' 
joined hands, which now rest behind the gentlemen's 
necks. 

d) The ladies break their holds and crook their elbows 
tightly around the gentlemen's necks. (This is very 
important, or there may be an accident.) The gentle 
men also let go of each other, and with their arms 
crossed over the ladies' shoulders, each takes a hold 
as securely as possible under the ladies' armpits. They 
all four throw their heads back as far as possible and 
circle to the left, the gentlemen lifting the ladies. The 



202 EIGHT HANDS OVER 

centrifugal force is so great that if the gentlemen spin 
fast with short steps and their feet close together, or 
even sometimes interlaced through each other, the 
ladies' feet will come off the floor and they will spin 
around flattened out at a level with the men's should 
ers. The men often dip slightly as they spin them, 
raising and lifting so that the ladies' bodies swing up 
and down like the wings of a butterfly, their feet 
often almost touching above the gentlemen's heads. 
This last should not be attempted until the hold 
is completely mastered and they know what they are 
doing. I have seen an improperly held lady hurled 
clear across the room and against the wall. I have seen 
arms broken from falls in this dance. And the whirling 
feet of the ladies may do much damage if they hit 
anyone, or be severely hurt themselves if they hit 
any hard object 

e) The four dancers break holds, and separating, join 
hands in a regular circle of four. See page 160 for 
directions for the docey-doe. 

f ) First couple advances to third couple and repeats, then 
to fourth couple, and returns to place in square. 

3. See page 152 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 

O B O 

Most dancers prefer avoiding the dangers and being less 
strenuous. They execute this figure in the old form of the 
California Show Basket. Both the ladies' and gentlemen's 
joined arms are lowered in part (d) to the others' waists. 
All four lean back as far as possible, held at the waist, and 
form a basketlike group, flaring wide at the top. In this 
position they turn very slowly to the left. This can be very 
graceful and beautiful, although the footwork feels awkward 
to the dancers. 

In order to make the footwork neat and co-ordinated a 
buzz step should be used. When circling to the left each 
dancer crosses his right foot over in front of his left and 
keeps it there through all the circling. The full weight is put 
on the right foot which steps flat on the floor, but the left 
foot (which is crossed behind) , takes the weight only with 
a light step on the toe. With the four dancers stepping in 



EIGHT HANDS OVER 203 

unison with their right feet and touching their left toes in 

unison, a lovely smooth waving motion is given to the circle. 

If the caller wishes to indicate this form-, he can call : 

Eight hands over, 

Ladies boiv and gents boiv under. 

California Shoiv Basket. What a ivonder! 

Then if he wishes an intermediate form that is full of 
good comedy, he can call : 

Eight hands over, 

Ladies bow and gents bow under. 

Set 'em up! And spin like thunder! 

The men in this case sweep their arms down below the 
ladies' knees and literally lift them up, so that the ladies are 
sitting on these intertwined arms at the height of the men's 
shoulders. If they lean back and out they can form an 
awkward-looking Etruscan-vase effect, but I laugh more 
when they lean over and pound the men on the head and 
squeal, "Let me down ! Let me down !" 

Now if the caller wants the real MacKoy with lots of 
action he calls : 

Flap them, boys, and flap like thunder! 



r 



J 

V. 



Right 
and 
Left 

Group 



Making use of the old figure, right and left 
through and right and left back in com 
bination with any other change. For 
a discussion of right and left 
through see page 127, 



206 



PROMENADE THE OUTSIDE RING AND DOCEY-DOE 



Promenade the Outside Ring and Docey-Doe 





V 

\ 




THE CALL: 

1. One foot up and the other foot down, 
Grab your honey in your arms, 
And turn her around, 

And allemande left as you come down, 
Now promenade your honey 'round. 

2. a) First couple balance, 

First couple siving. 

b) First couple promenade the outside ring. 

c) Right and left with the couple you meet, 
And right and left back* 

d) The two ladies change, 
And change right back. 

e) Four hands up and here %ve go 
Around and around ivith a docey-doe. 

f ) And a right and left through to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (c) . 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
A right and left home. 



PROMENADE THE OUTSIDE EING AND DOCEY-DOE 207 

3. And everybody siving, 

Allemande ho! 

Right hands up and here -we go, 

Promenade! 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for directions or variations, 

2. a) First couple divide, and each takes four steps back 

from the other, then advancing together, take the 
dance position and swing. 

b) Then in promenade position (side by side, lady on the 
right, holding hands with arms crossed in front) they 
march around the outside of the square and passing 
their own place advance to the second couple. 

c) The first and second couples pass through each other, 
the ladies passing between the opposite couple (see 
page 127 for full directions.) Each couple turns left 
about and passes back through the other. 




Right and left with the couple you meet. 



208 



PROMENADE THE INSIDE RING 



d) The two ladies advance to each other touching right 
hands and pass on to the opposite gentleman to whom 
they give their left hands, turn around the gentleman 
(to the left) while the gentlemen pivot with the 
ladies, who return to their places touching right hands 
as they pass each other. 

e) See page 160 for directions and variations of the docey- 
doe. 

f ) The couples pass through each other as before, the 
second couple turning to place, while the first couple 
advances to the third couple, and repeats 2 from (c), 
then they advance to the fourth couple, and finish by 
passing through them to their home position. 

3. See page 153 for directions or variations. 



Promenade the Inside Ring 




PROMENADE THE INSIDE RING 

THE CALL: 

1. Salute your company and the lady on the left, 
All join paddies and circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple balance, first couple stving, 

b) First couple promenade the inside ring. 
While the roosters croiv and the birdies sing f 
And the geese overhead are on the wing. 

c) Right and left with the couple you meet 

d) And the sides the same. 
Now a right and left back. 

e) Now the tivo ladies change. 
And change right back. 

Form two rings and make 'em go. 
Four ladies break with a docey-doe. 

f ) Now a half promenade. 

g) And a right and left home. 

3. Now balance home and everybody swing. 

Now siuing on the corner like swingin f on the gate, 
And now your own if you're not too late. 
Allemande left with your left hand 



209 




Two ladies change. 



210 PROMENADE THE INSIDE RING 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet your honey and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 

couples. a 3 

Often called Promenade the outside ring, and instead of 
sides the same sometimes called two off couples the same. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitutions. 

2. a) First lady and gentleman step back from each other 

four steps, then advance to each other and swing 
twice around. 

b) They take the promenade position and march around 
inside of the square, passing their own position, and 
advance to the second couple. 

c) First and second couple pass through each other. (See 
preceding page.) 

d) At the same time, couples three and four pass through 
each other in the same manner. All couples pass back 
to place. 

e) The first and second ladies change places as in the 
preceding dance and the third and fourth ladies 
change over and back at the same time. 

f ) All couples take promenade position and first and sec 
ond couples pass each other to the opposite's place 
(men passing left shoulders), make a left-about turn 
and again face each other. At the same time the third 
and fourth couples do the same with each other. 

g) Each couple passes through the opposite couple and 
back to place in the square. 

h) Each group now joins hands in a circle of four and 
does a docey-doe. (See page 160 for directions.) 

3. See page 155 for directions for this ending. 

VARIATION: 

This dance can be speeded up with more dancers in 
action if the first and third couples are called out at the same 
time. They promenade at the same time on opposite sides of 
the inside ring. In this case the call and the sides the same 
is of course omitted. For the repetition of the dance the 
second and fourth couples are called out at the same time. 



RIGHT AND LEFT 

Right and Left 



211 




THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing his prettiest gal 
Left allemande and right hand grand, 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) First and third couples lead to the right, 

b) With a right and left through, 
And a right and left back. 

c) Two ladies change 
And change right back. 

d) Ladies star by the right in the center of the set, 

e) Tioo gents turn in a little side bet. 

f ) Noio grab your oiun you're not through yet 

g) And circle four with the couple you met. 
Docey-doe ivith the gent you know 

The ladies go si and the gents go do. 
Balance home and everybody swing. 




Ladies circle four in the center of the set, 
Gents turn left in a little side bet. 



212 RIGHT AND LEFT 

3. Left allemande and a right hand grand. 
Plant your taters in a sandy land, 

And promenade back to the same old stand. 

Repeat 2 and 3 with "second and fourth couples out 
to right." 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 for directions. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple while the third 

couple advances to the fourth couple. And throughout 
the dance the third and fourth couples execute the 
same movements as described for the first and second 
at the same time. 

b) First and second couples pass through each other and 
back. (See page 127 for directions.) 

c) First and second ladies change places with each other 
and back. (See page 127 for directions.) 

d) All four ladies join right hands and circle once 
around to the left in the center of the set. 

e) First and second gentlemen join left hands and circle 
twice around. (Third and fourth gentlemen, of course, 
do the same thing.) 

f ) Timing the three circles (the four-hand mill of ladies 
with a two-hand mill of men on either side) so each 
dancer is back to original position at the same mo 
ment, each gentleman takes his partner's left hand in 
his right so they face the opposite couple. Each group 
of four joins hands in a ring and circles to the left. 

g) First and second couples do the docey-doe (see page 
160) , and the third and fourth couples the same. Each 
couple returns to own place in the square. 

3. See page 153 for directions. 



SWING YOUR OPPOSITE ALL ALONE 

Swing Your Opposite All Alone 

THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing Ms prettiest gal, 
Left allemande and a right hand 

grand, 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) First couple out to the right, 

b) Siving your opposite all alone, \ v , 

c) Now the one you call your own. ~~~"~ 

d) Now your opposite; don't be afraid. 

e) Now your own and half promenade, 

f ) And right and left through to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b) . 
Repeat again changing last line to : 

And right and left home. 



213 




Half promenade. 



214 SWING YOUR OPPOSITE ALL ALONE 

3. All eight balance and all eight swing, 
A left allemande, 
And a right hand grand, 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 for directions or substitutions. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) First gentleman swings the second lady and second 
gentleman swings the first lady once around. The two 
gentlemen face each other and put the ladies down on 
the right. 

c) Each gentleman swings his partner once around, put 
ting her down to the right. 

d) Each gentleman again swings the opposite lady. 

e) Each gentleman again swings his partner, putting her 
on his right. He takes the promenade position and 
walks with her past the opposite couple (gentlemen 
passing left shoulders), and makes a left turn, again 
facing the opposite couple. 

f) Each couple passes through the opposite couple (see 
page 127) and the first couple passes on to the third 
couple while the second couple turns to their own 
place. After repeating with the third couple, the first 
couple advances to the fourth couple, repeats with 
them and then back to their own positions. 

3. See page 154 for directions. 



CHANGE AND SWING HALF 215 

Change and Swing Half 

THE CALL: 

1. Salute partners, salute corners, 
Join hands and circle round, 
Swing } em hard and trot 'em home. 

2. a) First couple out to the right, 

b) Change and swing half, 

c) Change and swing half, 

d) Change and swing half, 
And don't be afraid, 

e) Change and swing half 
And a half promenade. 

f ) Right and left through 
And on to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b). 
Repeat again changing (f) to: 
Now right and left home. 

3. Sluing, swing, everybody swing! 
Allemande ho! 

Right hand up and around ice go, 

Meet your partner and promenade home. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 





Change and swing half. 



216 CHANGE AND SWING HALF 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for directions or substitutions. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) First gentleman takes second lady by both hands and 
turns her half around to the right, so that he stands 
in her position and she in his. The second gentleman 
turns the first lady in the same manner. 

c) Each gentleman turns to his partner and taking her 
by both hands turns her in the same manner, so that 
he changes positions with her. 

d) Now each gentleman takes the opposite lady and turns 
her again. 

e) Each gentleman turns his partner again, and it brings 
everyone back to the position from which they started. 
Each gentleman takes his partner at his right side, 
holding with hands crossed in front, and promenades 
past the opposite couple, gentlemen passing left 
shoulders, and each gentleman pivots and turns him 
self and his partner left about so they face the 
opposites. 

f ) Couples advance to each other, and each gentleman 
takes the opposite lady by the right hand, and the 
couples pass through each other (ladies going between 
the opposite couple). As soon as they pass through, 
each gentleman takes the left hand of his partner 
with his left and puts his right hand behind her waist. 
In this position the second couple turn to their original 
place and the first couple advance to the third and 
repeat the figure. Then they advance to the fourth 
couple and on the last repetition they return to their 
places in the square. 

3. See page 153 for directions, or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



RIGHT AND LEFT FOUR AND SIX 

Right and Left Four and Six 



217 








THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right, 

b) With a four and a half. 

c) Right and left four, 
And a right and left six. 
Right and left on, 

And a right and left "back. 




Right and left six. 



218 RIGHT AND LEFT FOUR AND SIX 

d) On to the next and circle four. 
Docey-doe with the gent you know. 
The lady goes si, the gent goes doe. 

e) On to the next with a four and a half. 
Right and left four, 

And a right and left six. 

Right and left on, 

And a right and left back. 

f ) Balance home and everybody swing. 

3. A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
Hand over hand around the ring. 
Hand over the hand with the dear little thing. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for the second, third, and fourth 
couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitutions. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple and joining 

hands they circle half around so that the first couple 
is on the outside and the second couple toward the 
center. 

b) First couple then do a right and left through (see page 
127) and, while the second couple turns around, the 
first couple continues on with a right and left through 
with the fourth. As the first couple turns around in 
place, the fourth continues on with a right and left 
through with the second couple. The fourth couple 
turns and stands in the second couple's place while the 
second couple continues on with a right and left 
through with the first. This leaves the first couple 
in the center, the second couple standing in the fourth 
couple's place and the fourth couple standing in the 
second couple's place. 

c) First couple advances to third couple, and joining 
hands they circle full around to the left, finishing with 
a docey-doe (see page 160)* 



RIGHT AND LEFT FOUR AND SIX 219 

d) First couple advances to fourth couple's place, where 
the second couple are still standing. They repeat (b) 
which puts the fourth and second couples each back 
in their own places. 

f ) First couple, who is again in center, balances home 
and all swing. 

3. See page 153 for directions or substitutions. 



220 EIGHT AND LEFT FOUR AND CENTER COUPLE SWING 

Right and Left Four 
And the Center Couple Swing 






THE CALL: 

1. Everybody siving his prettiest gal 
And promenade, boys, promenade. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the rig\t 

b) And a four and a half. 

c) Right and left four 

And the center couple swing. 

d) Right and left six 

And the center couple swing. 

e) Right and left on 

And the center couple siving. 

f) Right and left back 

And the center couple swing. 

g) Now circle four with the odd couple oh, 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 

h) Now on to the next. 

Repeat 2 from (b) changing (g) and (h) to: 
Balance home. 

3. And swing 'em all day. 
Allemande left in the same old way. 
Hand over hand and a right and left grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



RIGHT AND LEFT POUR AND CENTER COUPLE SWING 221 

This is sometimes called as follows : 

Right and left through and center two siving, 
Right and left through and center two swing, 
Right and left through and center two siting, 
Right and left through and center two swing, 
Now lead to the foot 
With a circle four and a docey-doe. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for directions or substitutions. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) They all join hands and circle half around so as to 
change places. 

c) They pass through each other with a right and left 
(see page 127) leaving the first couple in the center of 
the set. First couple takes regular dance position and 
swings, while the second couple turns facing set. 




Right and left four and the center couple swing. 



222 RIGHT AND LEFT BACK AND BOTH COUPLES SWING 

d) First couple then passes through fourth couple with 
a right and left. The fourth couple, now in the center, 
swings, while the first couple turns around. 

e) The fourth couple goes on and does a right and left 
with the second. The second is now in the center and 
swings. 

f ) The second couple now does a right and left with first 
couple. This puts the first couple back in the center 
where they swing again. And it leaves the second 
couple standing in the fourth couple's place and the 
fourth couple standing in the second couple's place. 

g) The first couple now advances to the third couple, 
who have stood idle so far, and joining hands with 
them circles and does a docey-doe (see page 160). 

h) They now advance to the fourth position where the 
second couple is standing and by repeating from (b) 
through (f) they get the second and fourth couples 
back in their own positions, and they balance home 
from the center of the set. 

3. See page 154 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



Right and Left Back 
and Both Couples Swing 



o 




RIGHT AND LEFT BACK AND BOTH COUPLES SWING 223 

THE CALL: 

1. All jump up and never come down. 
Siring your honey around and around 
'Til the hollow of your foot 

Makes a hole in the ground, 
And promenade, boys, promenade. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right, 

b) Right and left through 

And the center couple swing, 

c) Right and left back 
And both couples swing. 

d) Now four hands up and here we go, 
Round and around and a docey-doe. 

f ) On to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b) 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 

3. And everybody swing. 

Swing your opposite across the hall 
Now the lady on your right. 
Noiv your opposite across the hall. 
No iv your oim and promenade all. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 




Right and left back and both couples swing. 



224 RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for directions or substitute any introduction 
given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) Two couples pass through each other with a right and 
left (see page 127) . As the first couple turns around to 
face the set the second couple (who is in the center) 
takes dance position and swings. 

c) They pass back through each other with a right a.nd 
left and both couples now take dance position and 
swing. 

d) The four join hands and circle and then do a docey- 
doe (see page 160). 

f ) The first couple now advances to the third couple. 

3. See page 155 for directions or substitute any other ending 
given there. 



Right and Left Through and Swing That 
Girl Behind You 



x" 

vC") x i 



THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left. 

All join hands and. circle to the left, 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple balance-swing, 

Lead right out to the right of the ring. 
b) Right and left through 

And swing that girl behind you. 



RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH 225 

c) On to the next 

With a right and left through 
And swing that girl behind you. 

Repeat (c). 

3. No-iv single promenade 
With the lady in the lead. 
Now turn right back 
You're all agreed, 

And swing that girl, that pretty little girl, 
Swing that girl behind you. 
Promenade to places now. 

Repeat two more times, until straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



Some callers prefer the variation : 

Circle four hands half, 

Now right and left through 

And sioing that girl behind you. 

Noiv right and left through to the next. 

Then repeat with another : 
Circle four hands half. 




And swing that girl behind you. 



226 RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitutions. 

2. a) First couple step back from each other four steps, 

then forward and take dance position and swing. 
They then advance to second couple. 

b) They pass through the second couple with a right and 
left (see page 127) and then each man turns back 
(partners turning back to back) and swings the oppo 
site lady. 

c) The first gentleman and the second lady go on to the 
third couple and pass through them with a right and 
left, and each man turning back swings the opposite 
lady, 

The first gentleman with the third lady now goes 
on and repeats with the fourth couple. 

3. Each gentleman now places his lady in front of him, and 
they promenade in single file. Then each gentleman turns 
back and swings the girl behind him. He now places her 
in front of him, and they promenade again and so con 
tinue until each has his own partner. They then take 
regular promenade position and continue around to their 
own places. 



Single 
Visitor 
Group 



In which either the gentleman or the lady of one 
couple visits aro'und the set alone. 



228 



ADAM AND EVE 

Adam and Eve 



THE CALL: 

1. One foot up and the other foot 

doivn. 

Grab your honey in your arms 
And turn her around. 
Noiv allemande left as you come 

down. 
And promenade your partner 

round. 

2.a ) First lady out to the couple on the right. 

b) Swing Mr. Adam, 

c) And swing Miss Eve, 

d) Now siving old Adam before you leave; 

e) And don't forget your own. 

f ) On to the next. 

Repeat 2 beginning with (b). 
Repeat again omitting the last line. 

3. Now everybody swing. 
And swing 'em all day. 
Noiv allemande left in the same old way. 




And swing Miss Eve. 



ADAM AND EVE 229 

Now hand over hand with a right and left grand. 
Oh, some'll go right and some'll go left. 
Now Promenade! 

Repeat 2 and 3 complete for the second, third, and 
fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for explanations or substitute any other 
introduction given there. 

2. a) First lady advances to the second couple while the 

first gentleman remains in his place. 

b) She joins right hands with the second gentleman and 
swings him once around. 

c) She now joins left hands with the second lady and 
swings her once around. 

d) She swings the second gentleman again with a right 
hand swing. 

e) She skips back to her partner and joining left hands 
with him swings him once around. 

f ) She now skips on to the third couple and swings them 
in the same way always swinging the other men 
with her right hand and her partner and the ladies 
with her left hand. 

3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any other 
ending given there. 

Some dancers prefer using regular swing position, in 
stead of single hands. When the two ladies swing together 
it is best for them to stand with right hips together, and 
each lady grasp the other's arms just below the shoulders. 
However, the swing position is more often used for the next 
call and the one hand swing for this one. 



NOTE : This and the following dance are found in an in 
finite variety of forms and variations in different parts of 
the country. 



230 



OLD AKKANSAW 

Old Arkansaw 



THE CALL: 

1. Salute your company 
And the lady on your left. 

All join paddies ^~~ 

And circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade 
back. 

2. a) First lady out to the couple on 

the right, 

b) Swing your paw, 

c) Swing your maw } 

d) And don't forget old Arkansaio. 

e) On to the next 

Repeat 2 from (b). 

Repeat again, omitting last line. 

3. Balance home and siving 'em all night, 
Allemande left go left and right. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 




Swing your paw. (When a gentleman is called out.) 



OLD ARKANSAW 231 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
ladies. 



This call is sometimes heard : 
Swing that Indian, 
Swing that squaw, 
And now that boy from Arkansaw. 

Or when it is wished to send the gentlemen around in 
stead of single ladies, it is: 

First gent out to the couple on the right, 

Swing your maw, 

Siuing your paiv, 

And don't forget your mother-in-law, 

Or 

Don't forget to swing grandmaiv. 



THE EXPLANATION: This is a dance used for the sake 
of its comedy. 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any other 
introduction given there. 

2. a) First lady advances to the second couple. 

b) She takes regular swing position with the second 
man and they swing once around. 

c) She takes regular swing position with the second lady 
(which is a bit confusing and provocative of laughter 
since neither lady knows which will take the man's 
position) and they swing once around. 

d) She returns to her partner and swings with him. 

e) She goes on to the third couple and does the same with 
them, then on to the fourth couple. 

3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 

Note : When lady swings with lady or man swings with 
man, this awkwardness can be avoided if each grasps the 
arms of the other just below the shoulders, thus making 
their holds identical. 



232 



CHEAT AND SWING 

Cheat and Swing 



6 



THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing Ms prettiest gal, 
A left allemande and a right hand 

grand, 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) First lady out to the couple on 

the right, 

b) Cheat or swing or do as you 

like, 

c) And don't forget your own. 

d) On to the next 

Repeat (b), (c), and (d). 
Repeat (b) and (c). 

3. Now you're home and everybody siving. 
Siving your opposite across the hall, 
Now siving your corners t 

Noiv your partners, 
And promenade all 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
ladies. 




Cheat or swing. 



CHEAT AND SWING 233 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 for explanation or substitute any other in 
troduction given there. 

2. a) First lady leaves her partner and advances to second 

couple. 

b) She attempts to swing with the second man he either 
swings with her, or rejects her and swings with his 
partner. It gives rise to much laughter if the man is 
a good tease and keeps them both guessing, and if the 
girls are clever in cheating for the swing and do their 
best to leave the other in the lurch. 

c) She returns to her partner and swings with him 
often in consolation for having been left at her last 
attempt) . If the second man has swung with her he 
usually now gives his partner a consolation swing 
while the first couple are swinging. 

d) She now advances and repeats (b) with the third 
couple and so on around. 

3. For explanation see page 156 or substitute any other end 
ing given there. $ & & 

This dance is used for the sake of comedy. 

VARIATION: 

This dance is sometimes called : 

First couple out to the couple on the right, 
Cheat and swing and do as you like, 
Now circle four and docey-doe 
And lead right on to the next. 

This can become so complicated that the following rules 
had better be established. 

The active couple (that is, the couple called out) may 
either swing each other or either of them may swing any 
other dancer in the set. 

The inactive dancers may only swing their own partners 
or swing with an active dancer if so chosen. 

After the mixup you must get back with your own lady 
in your right hand for the circle four. 

From the ending in 3, the caller may now and then sub 
stitute cheat and siving for swing, when anyone may grab 
anyone else anywhere on the floor for the swing, then scurry 
back for the call go back home, and for a regular ending. 



234 BOW AND KNEEL TO THAT LADY 

Bow and Kneel to That Lady 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left. 

All join hands and circle to the 

f f i - / ** \ j 

left, ^ >, ^ 

Break and swing and promenade 

back, * 

2. a) First gent out to the lady on 

the right, 

b) Honor that lady, 

c) Bow to that lady, 

d) Kneel to that lady. 

e) Now step right back and watch her smile, 
Step right up and swing her aivhile. 

f ) Step right back and watch her grin, 
Step right up and swing her again. 

g) And on to the next 

Repeat 2 from (b) as written. 
Repeat again changing last line to : 
Balance home. 



o 




Kneel to that lady! 



BOW AND KNEEL TO THAT LADY 235 

And everybody swing. 

Now allemande left with your left hand, 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 

Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
gentlemen. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First gentleman leaves his partner and advances to 

the second lady. 

b) He gives her a slight curtsy, a slight nod of the head, 

c) He now gives her a very deep bow, with left hand on 
heart and right hand sweeping the floor, 

d) He now kneels before her with left hand on heart and 
right hand extended to her. 

e) He steps back from her four steps then advances to 
her and swings her once around. 

f ) He steps back again, advances again, and swings her 

twice around. 
g) He goes on to the third lady and repeats it all with 

her and then to the fourth lady. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ings given there, 



This dance, which should be done with exaggerated 
earnestness, is considered very tedious and uninteresting by 
my group except in exhibition, when a good clown has a fine 
opportunity. 



236 



THE CALL: 



HONOR THAT LADY 

Honor That Lady 



1. Honors right and honors left. 
All join paddies and circle left. 
Break and swing and promenade 

back. 



2. a) First gent out to the lady on the right 

b) Honor that lady, 

c) Honor her again. 

d) You honored her so nice, 
Noiv honor her again. 

e) Swing that lady, 

f ) Swing her again. 

g) You swung her so nice, 
Now swing her again. 

h) Balance to the next 

Repeat 2 from (b) as written. 
Repeat again changing last line to : 

Balance home. 



G 




Honor that lady. 



HONOR THAT LADY 237 

And everybody swing, 
Now allemande left icith your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
And promenade, oh, promenade! 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
gentlemen. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for directions or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) The first gentleman leaves his partner and advances to 

the second lady. 

b) He bows to her politely. 

c) He bows to her with any exaggerated piece of clown 
ing he can think of. 

d) He goes down, perhaps on both knees to her, with a 
deep salaam to her or perpetrates any extreme non- 

' sense that occurs to him. 

e) He swings her once around. 

f ) He swings her faster and twice around. 
g) He swings her furiously several times around. 
h) He advances to third lady and repeats all with her 
and then on to the fourth. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



This silly dance is used to raise a laugh and lighten the 
spirits if a program is bogging down. It must be done with 
mock chivalry and a great deal of clowning. It is a favorite 
with one of my caller friends, but he prefers to use it with 
a new group who are not acquainted with it. In this case 
the man does not try for accumulative comedy as in the 
directions above, but is surprised and embarrassed at having 
to bow again and then again, and then having to swing again 
and again. The comedy arises from his discomfiture. 



238 DOCEY OUT AS SHE COMES IN 

Docey Out As She Comes In 




THE CALL: 

1. Up and down and around and around, 
Allemande left and allemande aye, 
Ingo, bingo, six penny high, 

Big pig, little pig } root hog or die. 

2. a) First couple, docey corners right and left, 

Meet and swing in the center of the set. 

b) Now docey out as she comes in, 

Meet in the center and swing her again. 

c) Now docey in as she goes out, 

And meet her again and sioing her about; 

d) Then docey out as she comes in, 

And flop your wings and swing her ag'in. 

e) Then docey in as she goes out, 

And sioing her ag'in and give a little shout. 

f ) And docey out as she goes in, 

Yip and holler and everybody sioing. 



DOCEY OUT AS SHE COMES IN 239 

3. Allemande left as you come down, 

Grand right and left and so on around, 

Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for the second, third, and 
fourth couples. 



The simpler and commoner call which is used for this 
dance is : 

First lady out, 

And docey round the right hand gent, 

And siving your partner. 

Now docey out as she comes in. 

Meet her in the center and swing her again. 

And the last two lines are repeated four more times or 
until they are around the set. 




Allemande left and allemande aye, 
Ingo bingo six penny high. 



240 DOCEY OUT AS SHE COMES IN 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 for directions or substitute any introduction 
given there. 

2. a) The first couple separates, and the lady walks around 

the second gentleman, while the first gentleman walks 
around the fourth lady. This is not a dos-a-dos, 
walking back to back, but, while the corners stand 
still, the first lady and gentleman w r alk to each and, 
passing to the right, encircle them. They then meet 
in the center of the set and swing. 

b) The lady now walks around the second lady (by pass 
ing through the second couple and turning left) in the 
same way w r hile the gentleman walks around the 
second gentleman. They meet in the center and again 
swing. 

c) The lady now walks around the third gentleman (by 
passing between him and the second lady and turning 
left) while the man walks around the second lady. 
They meet in the center and swing again. 

Please note that to go out is to pass between two 
couples, to go in is to pass between the partners of one 
couple. The lady will go alternately in and out in 
order to encircle each person in the set in regular 
order. The gentleman follows her, passing always 
around the person that she last circled. He, of course, 
will therefore have to go out whenever she goes in and 
vice-versa. 

d) He now goes between the second and third couples 
and encircles the third man, while she splits the third 
couple and encircles the third lady. They meet and 
swing again in the center. 

e) He splits the third couple and encircles the third lady 
while she goes between the third and fourth couples 
and encircles the fourth man. They meet and swing 
again in the center. 

f ) He goes out between the third and fourth couples and 
encircles the fourth man, while she splits in between 
the fourth partners and encircles the fourth lady. 
They meet at their home position, and all four couples 
swing. 

3. See page 153 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 



SWING THE RIGHT HAND GENT 



241 



Swing the Right Hand Gent with the 
Right Hand Round 




THE CALL: 

1. All eight balance, all eight swing. 
A left allemande 

And a -right hand grand. 

Meet your partner and promenade. 

2. a) First lady out to the right, 

b) Swing the right hand gent 
With the right hand round, 

c) Partner with your left 
As you come down. 

d) Siving the opposite gent with the 
Right hand round, 

And left hand to partner as you come down. 



242 



SWING THE RIGHT HAND GENT 



e) Swing the left hand gent with the 
Right hand round, 

And left hand to partner as you come down. 

f ) Noui birdie in the center 
And seven hands round. 

g) The bird hops out and the croiv hops in, 
All join paddies and go round ag'in. 

h) The crow hops out loith a left attemande. 

3. Right hands to partners 
And right and left grand. 
Promenade eight 
When you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 

ladies. 

The end of this dance is sometimes called : 

Lady in the center and seven hands round, 
Lady swing out and the gent swing in. 
The gent swing out and everybody swing. 
A left attemande and a right hand grand. 




Birdie in the center and seven hands round. 



SWING THE RIGHT HAND GENT 243 

THE EXPLANATION : 

1. See page 151 for description or use any other introduction 
given there. 

2. a) The first lady leaves her partner and advances to the 

second gentleman. 

b) Taking right hands they swing once around. 

c) She returns, usually with a light skipping step, to her 
partner and swings him once around with left hands 
joined. 

d) She skips on to the third gentleman and swings him 
with the right hand, and returns to her partner and 
swings with the left. 

e) She skips on to the fourth gentleman and swings him 
by the right hand, and returns to her partner and 
swings with the left. 

f ) She now takes> a position in the center of the set. The 
rest of the set, seven of them, join hands and circle 
to the left, while she turns slowly in the opposite 
direction. 

g) She steps out and takes her partner's place in the 
circle, while he steps in to the center. All the while the 
circle continues to the left. 

h) They all do an allemande left, the first gentleman 
stepping out to the fourth lady, of course, and turn 
ing her with a left allemande. (If the gentleman will 
always remember to break the circle as he comes out, 
at the only two ladies who are together, and do his 
allemande with the one who is not his partner, he can 
make no mistake.) 

3. The allemande left completed, they continue as described 
on page 152. 



244 



DON'T YOU TOUCH HER 
Don't You Touch Her 




THE CALL: 

1. One foot up and the other foot down, 
Take your honey in your arms, 
And turn her around. 
Promenade, boys,. promenade. 

2. a) First gent out around the opposite lady, 

And don't you touch her. 

b) Now back around your own, 
And don't you touch her. 

c) All four gents around the right hand ladies, 
And don't you touch 'em. 



DON'T YOU TOUCH HER 245 

d) Noic promenade those ladies fair, 

But touch 'em? No sir, don't you dare! 

Repeat 2 as written, for second, third, and fourth 

gentlemen. 

3. Now allemande left ivlth your left hand, 
But don't you touch 'em. 

Right hand to partners and right and left grand, 
But don't you touch 'em. 
Promenade, boys, and touch 'em if you like. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for explanation or substitute any Introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First gentleman leaves partner, and crosses to the 

third lady. He either does a dos-a-dos around her, or 
leans his shoulder toward her and with arms held 
behind him in a comedy position, goes round her with 
out touching her, 

b) He now returns and encircles his own lady. 

c) Each gentleman now goes to the right behind his lady 
and encircles the next or right-hand lady with ex 
aggerated comedy. 




Right and left grand but don't you touch *em. 



246 LADY GO HALFWAY ROUND AGAIN 

d) They then promenade around with a lot of byplay of 
not touching each other. They return to the gentle 
men's positions, which means that each lady has fallen 
back one place. 

With three repetitions of (a) to (d) she is back in 
her own place. 

3. A regular allemande left and grand right and left (see 
page 152) is now done, but with exaggerated and humor 
ous care not to touch each other. The dancers often 
almost touch finger tips, but are careful not to really 
touch. At the final promenade they grab them firmly and 
joyously, as a relief from all the care not to touch them. 



A lot of comedy and fun can be had by this dance. In 
fact, the line "Don't you touch her" can be added to many of 
the different calls and thus adapt them to this pattern of 
fun. My dancers much prefer the preceding call "Swing the 
Right Hand Gent/' so adapted, to the regular call here given. 



Lady Go Halfway Round Again 




LADY GO HALFWAY ROUND AGAIN 



24? 



THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left. 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple balance, first couple sicing, 

First couple promenade the outside ring, 

b) And the lady goes halfway round again. 

c) Forward three and three fall back, 

d) Forward three and three stand pat. 

e) The gent dos-ee around those three, 

f ) And swing the left hand lady 
With the right hand round, 

g) Then the right hand lady 
With the left hand round, 

h) Then the opposite lady 

With both hands round, 
j ) And now your own 

With your arm around. 
k) Balance home and everybody siving. 

3. Nou) allemande left loith your left hand, 
Right hand to partner 

And right and left grand. 
Meet your partner 
And promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 

couples. 




The gent docey around these three. 



248 LADY GO HALFWAY ROUND AGAIN 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any other in 
troduction given there. 

2. a) The first couple step back from each other with a 

bow, then step together and swing. They then prome 
nade around the outside of the other three couples in 
the set. 

b) When they get back to their home position the first 
gentleman stands there alone, while his lady continues 
halfway on around the set and stops at the left side 
of the third gentleman. 

c) The third couple and the first lady take hands in a row 
with the gentleman in the middle and take four steps 
forward and four steps back to place. 

d) They then take four steps forward again and remain 
standing in a line in the middle of the set. 

e) The first gentleman now does a dos-a-dos around them, 
going to the left of the third lady, then, with his back 
to the three, sliding behind them to the right, he steps 
backward by the side of his partner and almost back to 
place. 

f ) He now advances to the fourth lady and taking right 
hands with her swings once around. 

g) Crossing the set he joins left hands with the second 
lady and swings her once around. 

h) He now goes to the third lady and taking her with 

both hands swings her around, 
j) And now, taking regular swing or dance position with 

his partner, he swings her. 

k) Back to place while each of the other couples swing 
also. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



PROMENADE YOUR CORNERS ROUND 249 

Promenade Your Corners Round 

THE CALL: 

X- 3 5 -X 

1. Salute your company and the lady - "-' 4/ 

on the left, pp ' v^> 

;om paddies and circle to the ! ____ i vl 



Break and swing and promenade 

back. /"--^ 

2. a) First lady out to the right, *.< - ~- y "^ 

Siving your opposite with your "^T^ - ^ ^" 
right, * ! ^ 

b) 2Vow 2/owr partner with your left. 

c) AZZ siving your corners 

And promenade your corners round. 
Repeat (a), (b), and (c) three more times, substi 
tuting same lady for first lady in (a). 

3. Noiv allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth ladies. 




Promenade your corners round. 



250 TAKE HER RIGHT ALONG 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanations or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First lady leaves her partner and advances to second 

gentleman. She joins right hands with him and they 
swing once around. 

b) She returns to her partner and joining left hands with 
him swings once around (often, in this dance, all the 
other couples join left hands at the same time and 
swing around) . 

c) Each gentleman now swings his corner or left hand 
lady in the regular dance or swing position. 

d) He promenades her around and back to his position. 
This means that each lady advances one place. 

On the repetition the first lady finds hgrself in 
second position and going to the right, in (a) she 
swings the third man with her right hand. She keeps 
advancing thus with each repetition until she is back 
in place. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 

Take Her Right Along 



: 



THE CALL: 

1. Everybody siving his prettiest gal, 
And promenade, boys, promenade 

2. a) First couple out to the right, 
b) Change and swing 

And take her right along. 
Repeat (b) eleven more 
times. I \ / 

LJ ' W 

3. Now you're home and everybody . , 

And on around for twelve 
swing, swings . 

Now allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



TAKE HER EIGHT ALONG 



251 



For variety in the repetitions of (b) it is sometimes 
called : 

Change and swing 
With the carry-o swing. 

or alternate between the two phrases. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) The first gentleman swings the second lady while the 
second gentleman swings the first lady. The first 
gentleman with the second lady now advances to the 
third couple w r hile the first lady remains with the 
second gentleman. 

On the next repetition the first gentleman swings 
the third lady and takes her on with him to the fourth 
couple. 

On the next repetition he swings the fourth lady 
and takes her across to the second couple. 

By constantly exchanging and swinging ladies and 
advancing them one position each time, on the twelfth 
time he swings his own lady back to her home position. 




Change and swing and take her right along. 



252 YALLER GAL 

Of course, the standard swing is always twice 
around. But in this dance most men are contented to 
swing each girl just once. However, expert swingers 
swing each girl twice around, advancing to the next 
couple as they swing, and hardly losing a second as 
they change and swing the next girl with the intoxi 
cation of a whirling dervish. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 

This is the "swingingest" dance there is. Some men get 
so dizzy that they cannot carry through to the end. There 
fore it is sometimes wise to send the first man around once 
(three swings), then the second, third, and fourth men, 
each with three swings, which gets all the ladies safely home 
at last. 

Yaller Gal 

THE CALL: 

1. All jump up and never come down ryi A 
Swing your honey around and LU ^ 

around, j s 
'Til the hollow of your foot makes 

a hole in the ground, ^ rji 

And promenade, oh, promenade. ^ LU 

\ 

2. a) First little yaller gal out around ' FT] ^ G^' 

the ring 
Meet your partner, meet him with a swing. 

b) Two little yaller gals out around the ring, 
Meet your partners, meet 'em with a swing. 

c) Three little yaller gals out around the ring, 
Meet your partners, meet 'em with a swing. 

d) Four little yaller gals, out around the ring, 
Meet your partners and everybody swing. 

3. Allemande left as you come down, 

Right hand to partners and so on around, 
Promenade eight, when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 beginning with second, third, and 
fourth ladies. 



YALLER GAL 



253 



If It is desired to send the men around the same way, 
little yaller gal Is changed to old alligator In the call. Though 
some callers always have the ladles go round but use alligator 
or yaller gal indiscriminately for them, apparently only for 
the sake of variety. 



THE EXPLANATION: 



1. See page 149 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 



2. a) 



The first lady leaves her partner and goes around the 
outside of the set, preferably with a skip step or a 
running step. When she gets back to her partner they 
swing. 

The first and second ladies both skip around the out 
side of the ring, the second, of course, ahead of the 
first as they circle, and both meet their partners and 
swing. 

The first, second, and third ladles all skip around the 
ring until they get back to their partners and swing, 
d) All four ladies now skip around the outside of the ring 
and all meet their partners and swing. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 



b) 



c) 




Four little yaller gals out around the ring. 



254 BUFFALOES AND INJUNS 

Buffaloes and Injuns 

(To be sung to the old tune of "Buffalo Gals Come Out Tonight") 

THE CALL: '"""tD v 



First little buffalo 

Round the outside, 
Round the outside, 
Round the outside. \ 

First little buffalo \ 

round the outside \ 

And everybody swing. 



o - 



Two little buffaloes 

Round the outside, 

Etc., as above. Four little buffaloes and two 

Three little buffaloes Indians around the outside. 

Round the outside, 

Etc. 

Four little buffaloes 
Round the outside , 
Etc. 




Four little buffaloes and three Injuns out around the ring. 



BUFFALOES AND INJUNS 255 

Four little buffaloes 

And one Injun 

Round the outside, 

Round the outside, 
Four little buffaloes and one Injun 
And everybody swing. 

Four little buffaloes 
And two Injuns 
Etc., as above. 

Four little buffaloes 
And three Injuns. 
Etc. 

Four little buffaloes 

And four Injuns 

Etc. 

And everybody siving. 
Noiv promenade to your seats. 

Note : Out around the ring is often sung instead of the 
line, Round the outside. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

Almost the same dance as the preceding dance, Yaller Gal, 
except that since it is sung it has no regular Western dance 
introduction or ending. And after the four ladies go round 
the outside of the set, they are joined by the first gentleman, 
then the first and second gentlemen, etc., until all go around 
the outside. 

The repetitions of Round the outside in each verse allow 
just time enough for the dancers to get around. 

In the second half when the Injuns join in with the 
buffaloes, there are fewer and fewer dancers left standing 
in the set until, by the last repetition, when four buffaloes 
and four Injuns go round the outside, the set which they go 
around is purely imaginary. 

The last line, Promenade, is spoken, of course, and not 
sung. 

Since this dance is sung to a fixed tune it would argue 
that it is the older of the two. And since its use of "buffaloes" 



256 BUFFALOES AND INJUNS 

is the same as the word in the title of the tune, it suggests 
that it might be the original dance. 

"Yaller Gal" and "Alligator" of course, suggest a South 
ern origin for the preceding dance. I wonder how much it 
was changed in coming West, and if it might be the original 
which in turn suggested the Western buffalo and Injun 
version, 



r 



Line 
Dances 



In which the dancers usually form straight 
lines which advance and retire toward 
each other, or curving lines which 
progress in serpentine or circles. 



258 



FORWARD UP SIX 

Forward Up Six 







THE CALL: 

1. All eight 'balance, all eight swing, 
A left allemande, 

A right hand grand, 
Meet your partner 
And promenade. 

2. a) First couple out to the right 

And circle four. 

b) Leave that gal, go on to the next, 
And circle three. 

c) Take that gal, go on to the next 
And circle four. 

d) Leave that gal and go home alone. 

e) Forward up six and fall back six, 

f ) Forward up tivo and fall back tivo. 

g) Forward up six and pass right through, 
h) Forward up two and pass right through. 

Repeat (e) to (h). 



FORWARD UP SIX 259 

j) Now swing on the corner 
Like swingin' on the gate. 
Now your oivn if you're not too late. 

3. Now allemande ho, Right hands up 
And here ive go! And promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 entire for second, third, and fourth 
couples. 



Sometimes this dance is ended by substituting for (j) 
Lone gents go right and circle four 
Now docey-doe with the gents you know, 
The ladies go si and the gents go do. 
Now everybody swing. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any other intro 
duction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to the second couple. They join 

hands and circle to the left. 

b) The first gentleman leaves the first lady with the 
second couple (she remains to the left of the second 
gentleman and the three join hands in a row). The 




Forward up two and fall back two. 



260 FORWARD UP SIX 

first gentleman goes on alone to the third couple and 
joins hands with them while they all three circle to 
the left. 

c) The first gentleman takes the third lady on with him 
(leaving the third gentleman standing alone), and 
advances with her to the fourth couple. As he does so 
he changes her from his left hand to his right hand 
so that she is on his right side when they come to the 
fourth couple. They join hands with them and the 
four circle to the left. 

d) He now leaves the third lady with the fourth couple 
(standing in a line of three with hands joined and the 
third lady on the left of the fourth gentleman) and 
returns to his place where he stands alone. 

e) The six dancers standing in the side positions (the 
second and fourth men each with a lady on either side 
of him) advance four steps and retire four steps. 

f ) The two dancers standing alone (the first and third 
gentlemen) each advance and retire four steps. 

g) The two threes now advance to each other and pass 
through so that each exchanges place with the other 
three. In passing through each gives his right hand 
to the opposite person, thus passing to the left of him 
(in most dances the old English traffic rule of passing 
to the left survives). 

h) The two men advance to each other, touch right hands, 
and pass each other to the left. Each continues until 
he stands in the other's place. In repeating (e) to (h) 
they all pass back and stand in own positions. 

j) Each gentleman now swings the girl on his left that 
is, his corner girl on his left. He then returns to his 
partner and swings her back into home position. 

3. See page 153 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing- given there. 

tt 

If the second call is used the first and third gentlemen 
advance to and join hands with the three on their right. 
This makes two groups of four, who each circle to the left 
and then do a docey-doe (see page 160). After swinging to 
home position they are ready for any ending that may be 
called. 



FORWARD SIX AND PALL BACK EIGHT 

Forward Six and Fall Back Eight 



261 



I I 

i I 

i I 

L I 




["'I 

I i 

i i 





I 1 




["I 

i i 

I I 



THE CALL: 

1. Swing your partners, don't be late. 

Swing on the corner like s^u^ng^ri on the gate. 
Now your own and promenade eight 

2. a) First couple balance-siving. 

Down the center and split the ring, 

The lady goes right and the gent goes left, 

And f&ur in line you stand. 

b) Forward four and fall back four. 
Sashay four to the right. 

c) Fomvard six and fall back eight. 
Forward eight and fall back six. 
Sashay four to the right. 

d) Forward four and fall back four. 
Sashay four to the right. 

e) Forward six, fall back eight. 
Forward eight, fall back 'six. 
Sashay four to the right. 



262 



FORWARD SIX AND FALL BACK EIGHT 



f ) Fonvard four and fall back four. 

Forward four and circle four. 
g) Ladies doe and the gents you know 

Circle again and docey~doe. 
h) Balance home and everybody swing. 

3. A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



With beginners it is often better to change (g) to : 

Swing your opposite ivith your right, 
Now your partner with your left. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First couple step back from each other, then advance 

to each other and swing. They go down the center of 




Forward six wnd eight fall back. 



FORWARD SIX AND FALL BACK EIGHT 263 

the set and pass between the third couple. The lady 
turns to the right and stands at the left of the third 
gentleman. The first gentleman turns left and stands 
at the right of the third lady. They take hands four 
in a row. 

b) The four advance in a straight line four steps to the 
center of the set, and fall back four steps to place. 
Then with gliding steps the line of four circles around 
to right (each individual still facing center) until the 
line of four stands directly behind the fourth couple. 

c) Still holding hands in their row, the first lady gives 
her outside hand (left) to the fourth gentleman, and 
the first gentleman gives his outside hand (the right) 
to the fourth lady so that they form a very flattened 
circle of six, all facing center. This six advances to 
the center four steps and as they retire four steps, 
the second couple facing them goes with them. (This 
makes eight fall back.) Now the six advance again 
with the second couple who back up ahead of them 
to place. And the second couple stands in position, 
while the six retire to place. The four, still holding 
hands, slide around to the position of the first couple. 

d) They advance and retire again and then slide step 
around to the right and behind the second couple. 

e) Now they advance and retire as in (c) with the second 
couple, and the fourth couple following and preceding 
the six on the call of eight. They slide around to the 
right to the original position of the four. 

f) They advance and retire again and then join hands 
and form a circle of four in the center of the set. 

g) The two ladies do a dos-a-dos or back-to-back around 
each other. The two men dos-a-dos>, and the four circle 
again to the left and finish with the regular docey-doe 
(see page 160 for directions). 

h) The first couple returns home. All four couples 
balance with each other and then swing. 

3, See page 153 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



264 



FOUR IN A CENTER LINE 



With many sets on the floor, all advancing and retiring 
in perfect time, this is an impressive change to watch and a 
very simple dance to do. 

In fact, it is so simple that it is a favorite with beginners, 
in which case it is best to use the substitute call for (g) on 
the opposite page. Then each gentleman gives his right hand 
to the opposite lady in the circle of four, swings her around 
behind him. He then takes his partner by the left hand and 
swings her to the home position. 



Four in a Center Line 




T WO L A D I E"5 



AIM 



THE CALL: 



1. Salute your company and the lady on the left. 
All join paddies and circle to the left. 

Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple balance, first couple swing. 

Promenade halfway round the ring. 

b) Four hands in line to the center and back. 
To the center again and there stand pat, 

c) Side couples right and left along the four. 
Right and left back as you were before 



FOUR IN A CENTER LINE 265 ' 

d) Side ladies change along the four 

And change right back as you ivere before. 

e) Center four with a circle four. 

Now docey-doe with the gents you know. 
The lady go si and the gent go doe. 

3. Balance home and swing 'em all night. 
Allemande left, go left and right, 
Hand over hand around the ring, 
Hand over hand 'with the dear little thing. 
Meet your own and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

B 0; 
For a more complicated figure (d) is called: 

Side ladies change through the center of the four 
And change right back as they were before. 

For the most complicated form it is called : 

All four ladies change on a woven track 
And keep on changing 'til all change back. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The first couple step back from each other, then step 

together and swing. They promenade around behind 




Side couples right and hft along that four. 



266 FOUR IN A CENTER LINE 

the second couple and stand to the left of the third 
couple, with whom they join hands in a line of four. 

b) This line takes four steps to the center and then four 
steps back. They advance to the center again and 
remain there. 

c) Each side couple separates and advances to the center 
with the lady going down one side of the line of four 
and the gentleman going down the other. Each gen 
tleman takes the opposite lady by the right hand and 
passes her. As each couple advances beyond the line 
of four, the lady puts her left hand in her partner's 
left, and, with his right hand around her waist, he 
turns her around so as to face the set again. The 
two couples each separate and return to their places 
now in the same manner, along either side of the line 
of four. 

d) Each lady advances along the line of four (the fourth 
lady in front and the second lady behind) to the 
opposite man. She gives her left hand to him and is 
turned around by him so that she returns down the 
opposite side of the four and her partner turns her 
to place by the left hand. 

e) The line of four bends into a circle of four and exe 
cutes a docey-doe. (See page 160.) 

3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 



If it is desired to make the figure a little more compli 
cated the line of four separates in the middle and the two 
ladies give each other right hands and pass each other 
through this gap. Continuing down the other side, they 
meet and are turned by the men as before. 

For the most complex form, each lady in the center line 
of four advances to the nearest side lady (it is necessary for 
the first man to pass his lady around in front of him to meet 
the second lady) , the other ladies being already in position, 
The ladies give each other right hands and advance to the 
next men giving them left hands. The two men in the line 
do a half turn, each passing a lady to the center. The two 
side men do a full turn sending their ladies back into the 



FIGURE EIGHT 



267 



line. They continue this until each lady has been around 
each end man and is back in place. All the while the two 
center men keep passing the string of ladies on, always with 
a half turn to the left. 

Figure Eight 



\ 




"x 



THE CALL; 

1. All $ight bcdance, and all eight swing. 
A Uft aUemande and a right hand grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 



268 



FIGURE EIGHT 



2. a) First and third couples forward and back, 

Forward again and form a line 

With the ladies in the lead and the gents behind. 

b) Cut a figure eight with the lady in the lead. 

c) Circle in the center and break to a line, 
With the gent in the lead and the lady behind. 

d) Cut a figure eight with the gent in the lead. 
Then circle home. 

3. Swing your partners all around. 
Allemande left as you come doivn, 
Grand right and left and so on around. 
Promenade, boys, promenade. 



This is the commonest form in which the dance is en 
countered in the West. However, we occasionally see a more 
elaborate form which is really a better dance and is probably 
the original one. This more elaborate figure has several 
steps in place of (a), numbered below (e), (f), and (g) 
then in (h) and (j) it reverses the direction of the figure 
eight. It is called : 




Cut a figure eight with the lady in the had. 



FIGURE EIGHT 269 

e) First lady and opposite gent 
Right hands cross, left hand back. 

f ) Join rights with partners and balance in a line. 
With a gee and a haw 

And a gee and a haw. 

g) Break in the center and swing half around, 
h) Cut a figure eight with the lady in the lead, 
j ) Break in the center and swing half around, 

Cut a figure eight with the gent in the lead. 
Now circle four in the Kentucky way. 
Siving your rights, now your lefts, 
Now your own and balance home. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First and third couples, holding hands, advance four 

steps toward each other and then four steps back to 
place. They advance toward each other again and the 
first gentleman takes the third lady by the hand. This 
makes a curved line of four. 

b) The first lady now leads this line around behind the 
second couple by starting through the space between 
second and third positions and passing back to back 
around the second couple. Then she crosses the set 
diagonally and goes behind the fourth couple (between 
the third and fourth positions) completing her figure 
eight. The line of four faces the fourth couple in 
circling them. 

c) As the line reaches the center of the set the first lady 
and the third gentleman take hands and all circle 
four. The third lady and first gentleman break holds, 
again forming a line of four and thus putting the first 
gentleman in the lead. 

d) The first gentleman now leads them all in a figure 
eight around the same path that was taken by his 
lady. As they reach the center of the set they again 
circle four and break and swing home. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given ther^. 



270 FIGURE EIGHT 

The more elaborate figure is danced as follows : 

e) The first lady and third gentleman advance and join 
right hands and turn half around. They let go, re 
verse, join left hands, and turn half back. Still hold 
ing left hands, each takes his own partner with 
right hands. This makes a line of four, with the ladies 
facing second couple and the men facing fourth 
couple. All four balance by rocking forward on their 
right feet and closing with their left, then rocking 
backward on their right feet and closing with the 
left. They repeat this forward and back balance, the 
ladies and gentlemen going opposite directions and 
lightly swaying back and forth past each other (or if 
they prefer balancing together, they may all balance 
toward the fourth couple, then all toward the second) . 

g) The first lady and third gentleman let go each other's 
hands, and each couple pivots around their own 
clasped hands (individuals circling forward) and the 
first gentleman and third lady now take hands to 
reform a line of four. 

h) The first lady marches directly forward leading the 
line behind and around the fourth couple (starting 
through the opening between first and fourth posi 
tions) and continues the figure eight by crossing the 
square diagonally and encircling the second couple 
(starting around them through the opening between 
second and first positions). 

j ) As the line of four crosses the diagonal of the square 
again, the first gentleman and third lady let go their 
holds. Each couple pivots around their own clasped 
hands. The first lady and third gentleman now take 
hands, reforming the line of four with the first 
gentleman in the lead. He now leads the line in a 
figure eight around the same path taken by his lady. 
As the circle of four closes the men are left back to 
back (Kentucky wwy). They let go left hands, and 
then swing the right hand girl behind them (as in a 
docey-doe) then the opposite girl with the left hand, 
then their own with the right again, and so balance 
home. 



GRAPEVINE TWIST 271 

Grapevine Twist 

(As called by Mrs. Charlotte Coffman, Stone City, Colorado, 
who won the State Caller's Contest with this dance.) 




THE CALL: 

1. (No introductory call.) 

2. a) First couple, just you two, 

Step right out and spin 'em a few; 

b) Now gather in four to the middle of the floor, 
And dance again as you did before. 

c) Now pick up six, and don't get mixed, 
And dance around 'til you all get fixed; 

d) Then simmer down eight, and don't be late. 

e) Form the grapevine twist like the one on the gate. 
Here you twist and there you whirl 

Right around that pretty gwrL 

f ) Here you duck and there yu dive,, 
Pep up boys, and act alwel 

g) Twist 'em right and twi$t *em wrong. 
Straighten 'em out and trot right along. 

3. a) Now ottemand$ left with your left hand, 

Right fynd to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet y^nT partner and promenade, 
Repeat 2 for second couple and finish with : 



272 



GRAPEVINE TWIST 



b) Promenade, Indian style, 

Lady in the lead and single file. 

Turn right back and sioing 'em awhile. 

Repeat 2 for third couple ending with 3 (a) . 
Repeat again for fourth couple ending with 3 (b) , 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. With no introductory call the dancers come skipping on 
the floor in single file, hands waving and everybody "hol 
lering." Before they come in, they line up as first, second, 
third, and fourth couples with the men leading. If there 
is more than one set, it is necessary for the first man of 
each set to break from the line and skip around the circle 
where his set is to be in a direction contrary to the prome 
nade direction; that is, clockwise, until he has all his 
couples in position. 

2. a) The first gentleman takes his partner by both hands 

and skips once around in one spot with her near the 
center of the set. 




Twist 'em riffht, now twist 'em wrong. 



GRAPEVINE TWIST 273 

b) He lets go with his left hand and takes the second 
lady's hand while the first lady takes the second gen 
tleman's hand and they all skip around once as a 
circle four. 

c) The first gentleman again lets go with his left hand 
and takes the third lady's hand, while the second lady 
takes the third gentleman's hand making a circle of 
six. They skip once around. 

d) Again the first gentleman lets go with his left hand 
and takes the fourth lady with it while the third lady 
takes the fourth gentleman, making a circle of eight 
which skips around for a few steps. 

e) And then the first man lets go his left hand again and 
skips in under the raised arms of the second couple, 
leading his partner and the second gentleman with 
him. This makes it necessary for the second gentle 
man to "turn a dishrag" or turn in under his own 
right arm without breaking his hold. 

The first gentleman turns to the right when he 
passes under and circles back again with the others 
following toward the middle of the original circle. 

f ) He now leads the line under the raised arms of the 
third couple (the third gentleman this time "turning 
a dishrag" under his own right arm) and turns right 
once more circling around to the line, all of whom are 
still skipping and following him. 

g) He now leads them under the raised arms of the 
fourth couple and turns to the right as before for a 
few steps, then turns "wrong" or loops back to his left. 
He then "straightens them out" by turning right 
again and circling roim$ until ; they b^ve joined hands 
once more in a^skipping circle oi 



3. a ancj b) See pages 152 aB<J || for ^explanation or sub 
stitutions, 



274 RATTLESNAKE TWIST 

Rattlesnake Twist 

THE CALL: 

1. All jump up and never come doivn, 
And swing your honey around and 

around, 

'Til the holloiv of your foot 
Makes a hole in the ground. 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) Now all join hands and circle 

to the left. 
The first couple break. 

b) The first gent lead down the rattlesnake's hole, 
In and out with a rattlesnake twist. 

c) The first lady lead back 
With a rattlesnake tivist, 
And circle eight. 

3. .Now allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 





First gent had doum the rattlesnake'* hole* 



RATTLESNAKE TWIST 275 

This call, only partly remembered by him, was given me 
by an old-time caller up at Missouri Lake, Colorado. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) After all joining hands and circling to the left, the 

first couple breaks the circle by letting go each other's 
hands. 

b) The first gentleman passes under the raised arms of 
the fourth couple behind the fourth gentleman, in 
front of the third lady, between the third couple and 
behind the third gentleman, and so on until he has 
woven in and around everyone in the line. The whole 
line is still holding hands and without a break passes 
in and out after him through the full set. 

As the fourth lady passes under, she has to pass 
under her own left hand, and, without breaking holds, 
pass this left hand down behind her head and out 
behind her. Each lady has to do this half dishrag as 
she passes under her own hand. But the gentlemen 
find that since the line passes behind them they have 
to do a complete right about face under their own left 
arms before they can follow on after the leader. 

c) As the line straightens out and everyone has passed 
under, the first lady turns back and leads the line in 
reverse under the raised hands of the second couple, 
around the lady and back between second and third 
couple, in under the raised arms of third couple, etc., 
in and out through the whole line. 

In this case, as the second gentleman follows in 
under his own right ana, he passes it down behind his 
head and out behind Mm, Eaqh of the other gentle 
men in turn have to do the same. But the ladies, this 
time have to do a complete left about face under their 
own rigtft anx^. 

When the Jiiie is straightened out the first couple 
rejoin handis an<! they all circle to the left. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other 
ending given there. 



276 GRAPEVINE TWIST 

Grapevine Twist 

(Garden Variety) 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left. 

All join hands and circle to the / 
left, \ 

Break and swing and promenade 
back. 

2. a) First gent lead his partner '"-j ~' // 

Through the couple on the \ fTyC.. 1 ' 

right 
And around that lady for a grapevine hoist. 

b) Out to the center with a haw and gee, 

And around the gent with a twiddle-de-dee. 

c) Now circle four and lead to the next, 

d) And around that lady with a grapevine tivist, 
Out to the center and loop right back, 
Around the gent on a crooked track, 

Now circle six and lead to the next. 

e) And around that lady with a grapevine twist, 
Out to the center with a figure eight, 

Then aroimd the gent; he'll have to wait. 
Then circle eight. 




Out to the center with & haw and a 



GRAPEVINE TWIST 277 

3. Now allemande left with your left hand, 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight ivhen you are straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

a & 

This change is obviously derived from a New England 
Quadrille. And yet, it is the favorite square in Anson, Texas, 
where each circle is ended with a do-pas-o. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The first gentleman holding his partner by the hand 

leads her between the second couple and around and 
behind the second lady. 

b) To the center of the set, where he does a right turn 
and circles back over his own track and passes again 
between the second couple and around behind the 
second gentleman to the center of the set. 

c) All four join hands and circle once around to the left. 

d) The first gentleman and the second lady let go hands, 
and he leads the line of four between the third couple 
and around behind the third lady to the center of the 
set. He loops to the right and turns back over his own 
track where the second lady has just barely got by and 
leads the line around the third gentleman. The path 
he follows is an exact figure eight, except that the final 
upstroke continues on and bends around the third 
gentleman. He now circles around the center in such 
a way that the second lady e|tn join hands with the 
third gentleman, and fee ( tak$& tfef 'hand of the third 
lady, making a circle 'of ; $&^ $#^iK;a, few steps the 
circle is Broken by Ms teftlfeg go tfeeliand of the third 
lady* and ]$e feads the tf&^^&x; to thie fourth couple. 

e) He leads tfiw around behind the fourth lady to the 
center wJter the |i$0i!<K>jp& back over its own track and 

bet^eem Hie foiurfch couple ag^in and around the 
g$t!ema$i r II no^ cireles until it picks up the 
ec>*iptf Jsetrro^ ^e third lady and the first 
aid al ^ight circle to the left. 

8. See page i&S or {substitute any ending given there. 



278 BIRD IN A CAGE AND ALLEMANDE SIX 

Bird in a Cage and Allemande Six 

THE CALL: 

1. Up and down and around and 

around, 

Allemande left and allemande aye, 
Ingo, bingo, six penny high, 
Big pig, little pig, root hog or die. 

2, a) First couple out to the right, 

With a bird in the cage and 
circle three. 

b) Bird hop out and the croio hop 

in. 
All join paddies and go around again. 

c) The crow hop out and circle four, 

Now docey-doe with the gent you know, 
The lady go C and the gent go doe,. 

d) On to the next 

With a two, four, and six hands round, 
Then birdie in a cage ivith five hands round, 
The bird hop out and the croio hop in. 
All join paddies and go around again. 




DOTTED LINES 5ow LEFT 






Birdie in a cage with fii">@ hands round. 



BIRD IN A CAGE AND ALLEMANDE SIX 279 

e) Crow hop out with a six allemande. 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand, 

Meet your partner and promenade, 
f ) Couples swing in and reverse promenade. 
g) Now two, four, six, and eight hands round, 

Then birdie in a cage and seven hands round, 

Bird hop out and the crow hop in. 

All join paddies and go around again. 

Crow hop out with a left allemande. 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand, 

Meet your honey and promenade. 
Repeat 2 for second, third, and fourth couples. 



There are several variations of this call, but we find that 
this form works out the most smoothly. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) The first couple advances to the second couple and the 

first gentleman joins hands with this couple with the 
first lady standing alone in the circle of three. As 
they turn to the left she slowly pivots in the opposite 
direction. 

b) The first gentleman now steps in to the center while 
the first lady steps out and takes his place in the 
circle. 

c) The first gentleman now steps out, taking his place 
between the two ladies, and the four circle to the left 
and then do a docey-doe (see page 160). 

d) The first couple advances to the third couple, with the 
second couple following and they all join hands in a 
circle of six. 

The first lady steps tQ the center and the remaining 
five circle around her. The first gentleman then trades 
places with her a^aip. 

e) Instead of taking his place in the circle between the 
two ladies who are together, the first gentleman gives 
his left hand to the one not his partner. At the same 
time each of tibe other two gentlemen do an allemande 
left, and they all do a grand right and left (see page 



280 FOUR LEAF CLOVER 

f ) As they promenade, each couple swings in to the cen 
ter, pivoting around the gentleman, and promenades 
in the reverse direction. (Without this reversal it is 
confusing to get all four couples in the right order 
in the next step.) 

g) They all join hands again and this time include the 
fourth couple (between the first gentleman and the 
third lady.) The first lady then steps to the center 
while the seven circle round her. The first gentleman 
steps in and trades places with her again. He steps 
out between the two adjacent ladies again giving his 
left hand to the one not his partner. And they all 
finish with an allemande left, and right and left grand 
(see page 152) . 



Four Leaf Clover 

THE CALL: 

1, Swing your partners, swing all 




eight, 
Now swing on the corner like 

swingin' on the gate, 
Now swing your own and 

promenade eight. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple -s / x P ILOM e MA o e 

on the right 
And circle four, oh, circle four, 

b) Now swing your opposite with your right, 
Now your partner with your left, 

c) Now four promenade with shoulders over, 

d) Now a two and a four and a six hands round, 
A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
And six promenade and gents shoulder over. 
Six promenade like a three-leaf clover. 

e) Now two, four, six, and eight hands round* 
A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
Promenade eight with shoulders over, 
Promenade close like a four-leaf clover, 

3. Now swing, swing and everybody swing, 
Swing your opposite across the hall, 
Now the lady on your right. 



FOUR LEAP CLOVER 



281 



Now your opposite across the hall, 
Now your own and promenade all. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 or substitute any introduction given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple and joins hands 

with them and all circle to the left. 

b) Each gentleman takes the opposite lady by the right 
hand and turns her once around, then his partner with 
the left and turns her around. 

c) Each couple then takes promenade position (side by 
side with hands held crossed in front) and the two 
gentlemen lean their left shoulders over and brace 
against each other as the line of four promenades once 
around. 

d) Each couple swings in and join hands again, this time 
including the third couple, between the second lady 
and the first gentleman. They all circle left and then 
six do a left allemande and a right and left grand (see 




Promenade close like a four leaf clover. 



282 INDIAN CIRCLE 

page 152) . As they promenade, each gentleman again 
leans his left shoulder over so that all three touch and 
promenade in this close three-leafed form. 

e) They all swing in and join hands again, this time 
including the fourth couple between the third lady and 
the first man. They circle again and do an allemande 
and right and left (see page 152) . When they prome 
nade, they come close together, bend shoulders 'til the 
four gentlemen are leaning again and circle as a "four- 
leaf clover." 

3. See page 155 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 



Indian Circle 

THE CALL: 

1. War-whoop to center and war- 

whoop back, 7 L J~ J 

Swing your little squaw 'til all her /~, 

ribs crack, 
And promenade like you had 

feathers down your back. ^ r , 

<^ Hirr 

2. a) First couple out to the couple \ 

on the right, \ [}] ~~ 

Circle four in an Indian way, ^ - ^ 
Hold your holds and re-sashay. 

b) Then promenade in single file, 
Lady in the lead and Indian style. 
Turn right back and swing f em atvhile. 

Repeat (b) once. 

c) Now two, four, and six hands play, 
Hold your holds and re-sashay. 

b) Then promenade in single file 
Lady in the lead and Indian style, 
Turn right back and swing f $m awhiU, 
Repeat (b) twice. 

d) Now a two, four, $ix, and eight hand play, 
Hold your hold$ and 



INDIAN CIRCLE 



283 



b) Promenade in single file, 

Lady in the lead and Indian style. 
Turn right back and swing 'em aiuhile. 
Repeat (b) three more times. 

3. Noiv swing, swing, and everybody swing, 
And an allemande left with your left hand, 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand 
And promenade eight ivhen you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. Bending low, all take four steps to center and back, giving 
a war-whoop with hands wavering over their mouths as 
they do so. Then each couple swings vigorously and 
promenades once around the set. 

2. a) The first couple advances to the second couple and the 

four join hands and circle to the left. Without break 
ing holds they reverse and circle to the right, 

b) They let go their holds and continue walking in single 
file to the right. On the word "turn" each gentleman 




Promenade in single fie, 
Lady in the lead and Indian style. 



284 INDIAN CIRCLE 

turns back (a right turn or to the outside of the 
circle) and swings the lady behind him. 

On the repetition of this call he puts the lady he 
has just swung in front of him and they promenade 
again in single file, and when they turn back again 
each man swings his own partner. 

c) The first and second couple again join hands and this 
time take in the third couple between the second lady 
and the first gentleman and all circle left. Without 
breaking holds the six circle to the right. 

b) They break holds and promenade in single file, and 
each gentleman turns back and swings the girl behind 
him. They repeat this until each swings his own 
partner. 

d) They take hands again and this time include the 
fourth couple between the third lady and the first 
gentleman. All eight circle to the left and reverse and 
circle to the right. 

b) They break holds and promenade in single file again, 
turning back and swinging the lady behind until each 
gentleman gets his own partner. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



r 



Divide-the-Ring 
Group 



v_ 



Dances in which the characteristic is for one couple to 

advance through the center of the set and between 

the opposite couple, thus dividing the ring. 

Usually the lady circles to the right and 

the gentleman to the left and all do 

some symmetrical figure. 



286 DIVIDE THE RING AND CUT AWAY FOUR 

Divide the Ring and Cut Away Four 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 
All join hands and circle to the 

left, 
Break and siving and promenade 

back. 



r y I _ - 



2. a) First couple balance, first 

couple swing, 
Doivn the center and divide the ring. 
The lady goes right and the gent goes left, 

b) Swing when you meet 
At the head and the feet. 

c) Down the center and cut aioay four, 

The lady goes right and the gent goes wrong. 
Swing when you meet, 
At the head and the feet. 

d) Down the center and cut away tioo, 
The lady goes gee and the gent goes haw, 

e) And everybody siving. 




Down the center and cut away four. 



DIVIDE THE RING AND CUT AWAY FOUR 287 

3. Now siring on the corner, 

Allemande left with the one you swung, 
Right hand to partner and trot right along, 
Promenade eight when you get straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

O O 

There are several variants of this call. Sometimes the 
foot couple does not swing, such as : 

Sunng when you meet as you did before, 
Down the center and cast off four. 
Swing your honey and she'll swing you, 
Down the center and a-cast off two, 

or when it is desired that all four couples swing, the (b) is 
changed to : 

Siving at the head and the foot swing too 
And the side four swing as you used to do. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First couple step back from each other four steps, 

then advance and swing together. With the gentleman 
holding the lady's hand they walk down the center of 
the set and pass through the third couple, who 
separate to let them pass. The lady turns right and 
walks around the outside of the set and back to place 
while, the gentleman turns to the left and does the 
same. 

b) When they meet at their home position they swing 
again, and at the same time the third couple also 
swings. 

c) The first couple again goes down the center and sepa 
rates so that the lady, turning right, passes between 
the second and third couple, while the gentleman 
turning left passes between the third and fourth 
couple. Each continues around the outside of the set 
and back to place. They thus cut away or walk 



288 SPLIT THE RING AND ALLEMANDE 

around four (that is, two on each side) . When they 
get back to their own position, they swing again and 
the third couple again swings at the foot of the set. 

d) Then first couple again advances to the center and 
cuts away two (one on each side) by the lady passing 
through the second couple and circling the second 
gentleman and back home; while the gentleman 
passes through the fourth couple, encircles the fourth 
lady and returns home. 

e) All four couples swing. 

3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 

Split the Ring and Allemande 

THE CALL: 

1. Salute your company and the lady 

on the left, 
All join hands and circle to the 

left 
Break and swing and promenade 

back. 

2. a) First couple balance, first 

couple swing, 

Go down the center and split 
the ring, 

b) The lady goes right and the gent goes left, 

c) Swing when you meet both head and feet, 
And the side four the same, 

d) Left allemande the. corner girl, 

And swing your own with another whirl. 
Now down the center as you did before, 

e) Down the center and cast of four, 

Repeat (b), (c), and (d). 

Now down the center like you med to do, 

f ) Down the center and cast off two. 

Repeat (b) and (d), 

3. Allemande left with your left hand, 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 




SPLIT THE RING AND ALLEMANDE 289 

THE EXPLANATION : . 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First couple step back from each other four steps, 

then come together and swing. They advance together 
through the center of the set and pass between the 
third couple who separate to let them through, 

b) The lady goes back to place around the outside of the 
set to the right and the gentleman does the same to 
the left. 

c) When they meet they swing and the other three 
couples swing at the same time. 

d) Each man gives his left hand to the left hand girl and 
turns her around, then returns to his partner and 
swings her again. 

e) The first couple now goes down the center and the 
lady turns right between the second lady and the third 
gentleman and returns to place around the outside, 
while the gentleman turns left between the third and 
fourth couples. 

Repeat (c) and (d) as above. 




Swing when you meet both head and feet. 



290 



DIVIDE THE RING AND SWING CORNERS 



f ) The first couple advances again to the middle of the 
set and the lady passes right between the second 
couple while the gentleman goes left between the 
fourth couple. 
Eepeat (b) and (c). 

3. See page 152 for explanation. 



Divide the Ring and Swing Corners 

THE CALL: 

1. Up and down and around and 

around, \ 

Allemande left and allemande aye. \ 

Ingo, bingo, six penny high, < 
Big pig, little pig, root hog or die. 

2, a) First couple balance, first 

couple swing. 

b) Go doivn the center and divide the ring. 
The lady go right and the gent go left,, 

c) Swing 'em on the corners as you come round, 

d) Now allemande left just one 

And promenade the girl you swung. 




Swing 'cm on th# corner a you come around. 



DIVIDE THE RING AND SWING CORNERS 291 

e) The same old gent and a brand new girl, 
Down the center and away they whirl. 

The lady goes right and the gent goes wrong. 
Repeat (c) and (d). 

f ) The same old gent and a new little thing, 
Down the center and around the ring. 
The lady goes gee and the gent goes haw, 

Repeat (c) and (d). 

g) The same old gent and a brand new girl, 
Down the center and around the world, 

The lady goes right and the gent goes wrong. 
Repeat (c) and (d). 

3. Now swing, swing, and everybody swing, 
Allemande left as you come doivn. 
Right hand to partner and so on around, 
Promenade eight when you come straight, 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 150 or substitute any introduction given there. 

2. a) First couple separate four steps, return to each other, 

and swing. 

b) Hand in hand they walk down the center of the ring 
and pass between the lady and gentleman of the third 
couple. The first lady turns to the right and returns 
around the outside of the ring, while the first gentle 
man does the same to the left. 

c) When she arrives at his position, the first lady swings 
the second gentleman. The first gentleman swings the 
fourth lady. At the same time the two stationary 
corners also swing. 

d) Each gentleman now gives the lady on his left his left 
hand and walks once around her. Then returns to the 
lady he has just swung and promenades with her 
around the ring and back to the gentleman's original 
position. (Note that the ladies have each advanced 
one position and are now with new partners.) 

e) (f ) (g) The first gentleman having brought a new lady 
to his position takes her down the ring, divides as in 
(b) and then repeats (c) and (d). 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



292 



DIVIDE THE RING AND DOCEY PARTNERS 



Divide the Ring and Docey Partners 

THE CALL: 

1. Everybody swing his prettiest gal, 
Left allemande and a right . hand 

grand, j ; 

And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) First couple balance, first \ V- 

couple swing, ! 4 

b) Down the center and divide the 

ring, 
The lady goes right and the \. . 

gent gOeS left. D>cFr PAKTNEIM O 

c) Docey partners, one and all, 

d) Docey corners, don't you fall. 

e) Swing your own with a pretty little whirl, 

f ) And all run away with the corner girl. 

g) Same old gent and a new little thing 
Down the center and divide the ring, 

The lady goes right and the gent goes ivrong. 

Repeat (c) to (f). 

h) Same old gent and a brand new dame 
Down the center and turn the same 
The lady goes gee and the gent goes haio, 
Repeat (c) to (f). 



10' 




Docey corners, don't you fall. 



DIVIDE THE RING AND DOCEY PARTNERS 293 

j) Same old gent and a brand new date 
Down the center and through the gate 
The lady goes right and the gent goes wrong. 
Repeat (c) to (f). 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing, 
Allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 10 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) First couple steps back from each other four steps, 

then together and swing. 

b) They walk hand in hand down the center of the circle 
and pass between the lady and the gentleman of the 
third couple. The lady turns right around the outside 
of the set and the gentleman turns left. 

c) As they meet each other at their home position they 
do a dos-a-dos or encircle each other back to back. At 
the same time the other three couples face each other 
and do a dos-a-dos; that is, they advance to each other, 
each gentleman passes his partner (passing right 
shoulders) ; then each moves to the right; they pass, 
each other back to back, and, without changing the 
direction they are facing, return backward to place. 

d) Each now turns to the corner and does a dos-a-dos 
with the corner. 

e) Each returns to his partner, and partners swing twice 
around. 

f ) Each gentleman returns to the corner lady and, with 
a preliminary allemande left, turns her to his side and 
promenades around the set with her and back to the 
gentleman's position. (Each lady has thus advanced 
one place.) 

g), (h), and (j) The first gentleman having brought a 
new girl to his position takes her down the ring, 
divides as in (b) and the whole set repeats (c) 
through (f). 

B. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



294 DIVIDE THE RING AND CORNERS BOW 

Divide the Ring and Corners Bow 

THE CALL: ,,-- r , f - - 

1. Swing your partner, siting all / x /^-'"" \ \ 

eight. ^ j i 

Now swing on the corner like ! 

swingiri on a gate. 
Now swing your own and prome 
nade eight. 

2. a) First couple balance, first 

couple swing. \.__ 

Noiv down the center and CO ENE R S bow^Jop/, 

divide the ring. 
The lady goes right and the gent goes left. 

b) Now corners bow, and partners whirl, 

c) And all run away with the corner girl. 

d) Same old gent and a new little thing. 
Down the center and divide the ring. 

The lady goes right and the gent goes wrong. 
Repeat (b) and (c). 

e) -Same old gent and a brand neiv girl, 
Down the center and around the world, 
The lady goes gee and the gent goes haw 

Repeat (b) and (c). 



1' 



W/HlO.1. 




Corner bow! 



DIVIDE THE RING AND CORNERS BOW 295 

f ) Same old gent and a new little dame, 
Down the center and turn the same, 
The lady goes right and the gent goes left 
Repeat (b) and (c). 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing. 
A left allemande and a right hand, grand. 
And promenade. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First couple take four steps back from each other, 

four steps together and swing. They then cross hand 
in hand through the center of the ring, and pass be 
tween the third couple, the lady turning right around 
the set and back to place while the gentleman turns 
left to place. 

b) Each turns back to corner and makes a deep bow. At 
the same time the rest of the set bows to corners. Then 
each turns back to his partner and all four partners 
swing. 

c) Each gentleman again swings the corner lady, turns 
her to his side and promenades around the ring with 
her and back to his place (the ladies each advance one 
place). 

d), (e), and (f) The first gentleman having brought a 
new lady to his position takes her down the ring, di 
vides as in the last half of (a) and then the whole set 
repeats (b) and (c). He finally gets his own lady 
back and they are ready for the ending. 

3. See page 153 for explanation or substitute any ending 
given there. 



296 DIVIDE THE RING COMBINATION 

Divide the Ring Combination 

THE CALL: 

1, Honors right and honors left. 
All join hands and circle to the 

left. rj, 

Break and siving and promenade ~~~v x 

back. 1 J 

2. a) First couple balance, first ( 

couple siving, 
Down the center and divide the ring. 
The lady goes right and the gent goes left. 
Sioing on the corner like swingin* on the gate. 
Now allemande left just one 
And promenade the girl you swung. 
b) The same old gent and a brand new girl 
Down the center and away they whirl. 
The lady goes right and the gent goes wrong, 
Corners boio, partners ivhirl 
And all run away with the corner girl. 
c) The same old gent and a neio little thing 
Down the center and around the ring, 
The lady goes gee and the gent goes haw. 




All run &way with the corner girl 



DIVIDE THE RING COMBINATION 297 

Docey partners one and all 
Doceu corners, don't you fall 
Swing your own with a pretty little whirl. 
And all run away with the corner girl 
d) The same old gent and a new little girl 
Down the center and around the world, 
The lady goes east and the gent goes west. 
Swing your corners with your left, 
Now your partners with your right 
Now your corners with your left 
And promenade those corners round. 

3. Now swing, swing, and everybody swing, 
Allemande left with your left hand. 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) See page 290. 

b) See page 294. 

c) See page 292. 

a), (b), and (c) are repetitions of the three pre 
ceding dances. 

d) The first gentleman and his new partner divide the 
ring as above and as they return to place, all the 
corners turn once around with left hand holds. Each 
gentleman turns his own last partner with his right 
hand, then turns his corner with his left and prome 
nades with her. (She, of course, will be his original 
partner.) 

3. See page 152 or substitute any other ending given there. 

a & 

This combination form has more variety and is there 
fore more fun to dance with experienced dancers. For in 
termediate dancers it is sometimes well to let the first couple 
do a swing on the corner all the way round as in (a), then 



298 DIVIDE THE RING AND FORWARD UP SIX 

the second couple do (b) "corners bow" all the way round, 
the third couple do (c) "docey partners" all the way round, 
and the fourth couple either do (d) "swing with left and 
right" all the way round. Or better yet the fourth couple 
can summarize (adding the new figure (d) ), by doing the 
whole combination dance as given in 2 above thus changing 
the figure for each couple, or repeat (a) for (d) in this 
combination. 



Divide the Ring and Forward Up Six 

THE CALL: 

1. One foot up and the other foot ^ J__! 

down, 
Grab your little sage hens and 

swing 'em round. 
Allemande left as you come doivn, 
Grand right and left and so on 

around. 
Meet your partner and promenade. [/] 

2. a) First couple balance, first couple swing, 

Down the center and divide the ring. 
The lady go right and the gent go left, 

b) And between side couples you stand. 

c) Forward up six and fall back six. 

d) Forward again and right and left through, 

e) Forward up six and fall back six, 
Forward again and right and left through. 

f ) Same couple center and couple up foot, 
Four hands round and round you go. 
And the lady go si and the gent go do. 

g) Balance home and everybody swing. 

3. Swing yom opposite across the hall, 
Now your own if she's not too small 

A left allemande and a right and left grand. 
And promenade. 

Repeat 2 and S for second, third, and fourth couples. 




THE AND UP SIX 299 

EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 or substitute any other Introduction given 
there. 

2. a) First couple step back from each other four 

then step together and swing. Hand in they 

walk through the center of the set and between the 
third couple. The lady turns to the right and the 
gentleman to the left. 

b) The lady then stands between the second lady and 
the gentleman, and the man between the fourth lady 
and gentleman. 

c) The three on each side, holding hands in a line, ad 
vance four steps toward each other and then fall 
back four steps. 

d) They advance again four steps, and each gives the 
opposite person in the other line of three his right 
hand and passes beyond him. Each line thus reaches 
the other's position. The individuals turn around 
(rightabout-face) and take hands in the opposite 
direction. 

e) They advance, retire, advance and pass through again 
as in (c) and (d), and thus return to their own posi 
tions. 




Down the center and divide the ring. 
The lady go right and the gmt go left. 



300 



DIVIDE THE RING AND WALTZ CORNERS 



f) The first lady and the first gentleman advance to 
each other in the center of the set and the third couple 
joins them. The four take hands and circle to the left 
and do a docey-doe (see page 160). 

g) All return to positions, and all four couples swing. 

3. See page 156 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



Divide the Ring and Waltz Corners 

Must be danced to very fast waltz time. 



/ x 



// 



/ 



, / 
I I 

'.I ! 



\ 



\\ 




\\ll 



J 


\ \ 

\\ 

*.(* \ 






\ 



THE CAUL: 




I/ 



1. Honors right &nd honors lft f 

' to the left, 



2. a) ^ 



go right 
b) Swing o^ fk& corner m$k & w<M% f 








DIVIDE THE EING AND WALTZ 301 

c) Same old gent icifh a brand new girl, 

Down the center and go round the world, 
Lady go right ami the gent go wrong. 
bl) S icing on the corner with a waltz promenade. 

d) Same old gent if he ain't too late. 
Down the center and go round the state, 
Lady go east and the gent go west. 

b2) Swing on the corner with a waltz promenade. 

e) Same old gent, he's a doin* it brown. 
Down the center and go round the town. 
The lady go gee and the gent go haw. 

bS) Swing on the corner with a waltz promenade. 

3. Noiv you're home. 

All eight balance, all eight swing, 

A left allemande and a right hand grand, 

Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 
& a 

In calling the last line of (d), call the two points of the 
compass that square with hall and sets. 




Swing on the corner with a waltz promenade. 



302 DIVIDE THE RING AND WALTZ CORNERS 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 or substitute any introduction given there. 

2. a) First couple separate four steps, reunite and swing 

three times around. They then waltz down center and 
through the third couples, the lady turning back 
around outside to the right and the gentleman to the 
left. 

b) As they meet the corners (the second gentleman and 
the fourth lady), all take dance position with their 
corners and waltz once around the set. 

c) When the gentleman gets back to place with his new 
partner (the fourth lady) he goes down center with 
her and passes between the third couple again, (bl) 
They all swing on the corner and repeat the waltz. 

d) With his new partner (the third lady) he does the 
same except that this time he passes through the space 
between third and fourth couples and turns left, while 
the lady passes through the space between the second 
and third couples to the right. (b2) They all waltz 
corners again. 

e) With his new partner (the second lady) he goes to 
the center and while she turns right between the 
second couple he turns left between the fourth. (b3) 
They all waltz corners, this time getting their original 
partners back, with whom they waltz to their home 
positions. 

3. See page 152 or substitute any other ending given there. 



At the beginning of the dance they "cut off six," on the 
fir^t repetition, "the world/* they again cut six- For "the 
state** tibey cut four, and for the "'town" they ent two. 

Both the introduction and the ending a$ well as the 
dance* are walteed throp^hoiit. This givm a quaint and 
delfehtftef 



W4LTZ 303 

(A great favorite. Can be sung to the old tune "Sweet Evelina" or 
see special music. In some communities al! four couj>lt\s waltz *vnt**'. 
around the set as soon as music commences and without a call, Thon 
when each returns to place the caller sings.) 

THE CALL: 

a) First couple down center 
And there they divide 

b) The lady back center 
And the gent stay outside. 

c) Now honor your partners 

d) And don't be afraid, 

e) And siving on the corners with 

a waltz promenade, 
al) Same couple down center 

(And it is all repeated three more times until each 
gentleman gets his own lady again and waltzes her 
back to place.) 

Repeat entire for second, third, and fourth couples. 




The lady b&ck center and the gent stay outside. 



304 



WALTZ QUADRILLE 

WALTZ QUADRILLE 




vide. The tady back cpffor and fhe qent sfoyout tide Mow 



ft J ^J 

^ honor you* 


'f* 


utnm& 


n<t 


% 


'it* a - 7 


-fc? 
fe/i 


' m 
i am 


4 . 


3^5 
f w lag oft M 


e 




corners with a tvaltt pwne trade 




Younger sets who have danced this often get tired of 
the many repetitions. If the first couples dance twice, in 
stead of four times, then the second couples twice, the ladies 
will be back in place ; then the third couples only twice, and 
the fourth twice and they will be back again, and the dance 
will have been cut in half. 



THE EXPLANATION : 

a) The first couple waltzes down through the center of 
the set aBd between the third coupfe A$ they separate 
it loote wall f)r the man to tern the l^cty Hinder his 
left arm ^i% the flourish of a MtUi whirl 

b) She waltzes back to position alone ttoo^gh the center 



WALTZ QUADRILLE 305 

of the set, while the gentleman turns left and waltzes 
alone around the outside of the set and back to place. 

c) As they meet each makes a deep bow to the other and 
at the same time the other couples bow low to each 
other. 

d) Each turns and bows to the corner lady. (Don't hurry. 
Do not take dance position with corner until the words, 
"Swing on the corner.") 

e) Then each man takes his corner lady in regular dance 
position, swings her once around, and waltzes her 
around the set. It is important that each couple keeps 
its relative position the same while waltzing and that 
each follows the exact path of a promenade around the 
set, rotating always to the right to keep from breaking 
the symmetry of this path. Each must be back in 
place in exact time for the call when it continues. 

al) Each gentleman now has a new lady beside him. The 
first couple (with a new lady) repeats the above en 
tire. After dancing the whole dance four times (once 
with each lady) each gentleman has his partner back. 
And the call continues with "Second couple down 
center." 

Note: Instead of calling Swing on the corner which Is 
the standard form, some callers substitute Dip to the comer 
and waltz promenade, in which ease the waltz starts with 
the balance step described on page 100 Instead of with a 
swing. 

In Illinois they usiially call the first and third couples out 
at the some time. They waltz past each other across the 
center of the set. Each lady turns right around the outside 
of the set, and each gentleman to the lef 1 As the gentlemen 
pass the opposite ladies behind the side couples they pass to 
the outside giving the ladies the shorter path. This cuts the 
dance in half and keeps more people In action all the time. 
After the head couples have danced four times and liave 
their own ladies bacfe the $Ide couples do the same. 

The call cottlet be: 

dpwn center 

&y divide 
go right 
Amd ike gents pass owtsi&e 

fw* partner^ etc. 



r 



. 



Symmetrical 
Dances 



In which all four couples do the same thing at 
the same time, making a symmetrical 
figure, or opposite pairs do com 
plementary figures leading 
to a symmetry. 



308 



FOUR GENTS LEAD OUT 

Four Gents Lead Out 



THE CALL: 

1. All eight balance, all eight swing, 
A left allemande and a right hand 

grand. 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

2. a) Four gents lead out 

To the right of the ring. 

b) And when you get there 
Just give 'em a siving. 
And ivhen you do that 
Remember my call 

c) It's allemande left 

d) And promenade all. 

Repeat three more times. 
al) Four ladies lead out 
To the left of the ring 





Give 'em a swinff It's allemande left. (Showing all stages of this 

transition.) 



FOUR GENTS LEAD OUT 309 

bl) And when you get there 

Just give them a swing. 

And when you do that 

Remember my call 
cl) It's allemande left 
dl) And promenade all, 

Repeat three more times. 

3. (Usually omitted or any ending can be used.) 

& & 8 

It is apparent that this call was originally sung to its 
own special music. Sometimes we hear it now sung to the 
Irish Washerwoman. But usually today it is called, not 
sung. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) Each gentleman steps behind his own lady and ad 

vances to the next lady on his right. (The first gentle 
man advances to the second lady.) 

b) He takes regular dance position with her and swings 
twice around. 

c) He then returns to his original lady and turns her 
once around with his left hand. (That. is, the first 
gentleman does an allemande left with the first lady.) 

d) And then returns to the lady he Jia& jpst swung (that 
is, the first gentleman returns to the second lady). 
And he promenades with her ajouB$ the set and back 
to his own position. This means $acfa lady has dropped 
bac?k one position. After three more repetitions each 
lady is bacfe fewte wiife |i^r partner. 

al, bl) Each ib4rl$p& fe^^i her portlier and advances 

to fee &$$ ifap$ i0B; feer |^t 'a^f 'fwiags with 1 him. 
cl) She i<ifes !fft '^iti iqr original partner. 

dl) 

Iplfc^t Ms pomtfon. At 
- toti finally 

(fefec is 
tf m 




310 



THE CALL: 



TEXAS STAR 

Texas Star 



1. Salute your company and the lady 

on the left, 
All join paddies and circle to the 

left. 
Break and swing and promenade 



2. a) Ladies to the center 

And back to the bar. , 

b) Gents to the center 
For a Texas Star, 

With the right hand cross. 

c) Back with left and don't get lost. 

d) Pass your gal and take the next. 

e) Ladies swing in and the gents swing out. 

f ) Break in the center and everybody swing. 

g) Now allemande left just one, 

h) And promenade the girl you swung. 





(Just after) Ladle* swlnff in ewtd the 



owing out. 



TEXAS STAR 311 

Repeat three more times, on the first and second 

repetition saying : 
Pass that gal and take the next. 

And the last time saying : 
Pass that gal and take your oicn. 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing, 
Allemande left with your left hand 
Right hand to partner and right and left grand, 
Meet your partner and promenade. 

o o o 

The whole call, sometimes, is repeated in reverse by 
calling: 

Four gents to the center and back to the bar. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The four ladies advance to the center of the set and 

each makes a rightabout turn so they stand momen 
tarily back to back. (It is really more of a turn and 
a dip than a turn and a pause.) And then each returns 
to her own place. 

b) The four gentlemen advance to the center of the set 
and join their right hands and circle to the left. 

c) Each reverses and they join left hands and circle 
back to the right. 

d) Each continues circling past his OWB partner, and, 
still holding left hands in the -center, each man offers 
his right ^rtn to th$ ro*t fecly. She hooks on to his 
arm and Circles witi Mm in a double mill. 

e) The $j*!0men tefc gp, \'-m''M center ^nd each pivots 
his 3Wy ; tby T all : ria$r itt tofatlter and the ladies 
joii* rifpit !^M^!'ik't^ r &Witer, TS& -mill now reverses 
' k|t,t^;t^(if^$ still holding 

'- riglt 13^*1^ tod , th& pxen's arms hooked 

'' "'' 




'<3etw< m$ 'e^ch man swings 
with his^lady and they swing 



312 SWING AT THE CENTER AND SWING AT THE SIDES 

g) Each gentleman then swings the lady on his left once 
around with his left hand. 

h) And returns to the lady with whom he just swung 
and with whom he had circled in the mill, and they 
promenade around the set until the ladies are again 
called to the center. Each time the ladies advance in 
position to the next man until finally they come back 
to their own. 
3. See page 152 or substitute any other ending. 



Swing at the Center and Swing at the Sides 

THE CALL: 



1. All jump up and never come down, 
Swing your honey around and 

around, 

'Til the hollow of your foot 
Makes a hole in the ground. 
And promenade, oh, promenade! 

2. a) First and third couples for- 

ward and back, 

b) Forward again and the sides The start, each walks com- 

divide. pletely around his square 

c) Swing at the center and swing in direction indicated. 

at the sides. 





Swing at the center end swing at the sides. 



SWING AT THE CENTER AND SWING AT THE SIDES 313 

Siring at the center and swing at the sides. 
Siring at the center and siring at the sides. 
Siring at the center and siring at the sides. 
d) Now allemande left with your left hand. 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 

And promenade, oh, promenade. 

Second and fourth couples forward and back 

Repeat (a), (b), (c), and (d). 
Third and first couples fonvard and back. 

Repeat the whole dance again. 
Fourth and second couples fonvard and back. 

Repeat the whole dance again. 

3. Any further ending usually omitted. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) The first and third couples each advance four steps to 

the center of the set, curtsy to each other and return 
with four steps to places. 

b) They advance agaip to the center and stand facing 
each other while the side couples separate from each 
other, and stand individually at the four corners of 
a larger square outside the set. 

c) The first gentleman takes the third lady by both hands 
and swings around with her so that they exchange 
places and the third gentleman does the same with 
the first lady. At the same time, as the center couples 
swing in this way, the side couples also swing. The 
second gentleman advances to the fourth lady. They 
meet (at the home position of couple number one), 
take both hands and swlng^round exchanging posi 
tions, and th@y walk -backward to the other's original 
pomtioit At the same tfcnae the second lady advances 
to the fourth gentleman (meeting him in the original 
<$OtiitfM$ ,tOf 'til tlird couple) they take hands, turn, 
anid go to f^cti other's corners. 

(to gj&$jti ; repetition each continues around this 
,3431$?$ ,3* * t{te direction he is going, the individuals of 
the second awd f<H*rth couples going from corner to 
the larerer outer sauare. and the individuals 



314 SIDES DIVIDE 

of the first and third couples to the corners of the 
smaller inner square, always taking both hands of 
the person they meet in the middle of the sides, re 
leasing and continuing on to the next corner, until 
each is back in his original corner. 

000 

In both the outer and inner square the gentlemen go 
around the square from corner to corner in a clockwise 
direction, while the ladies go in a counterclockwise direction. 

d) Each gentleman does an allemande left (turns the 
left hand lady with his left hand) with his corner. 
It happens that this is always the person on the same 
corner of the other square. That is, each person in 
the inner square does an allemande with the person on 
the nearest or identical corner of the larger square. 
Then they give right hands to their partners and do a 
right and left grand around the set. When they meet 
their partners again, they promenade back to position. 
In the first repetition the dance is the same, but 
the sides come to the center and the head couples 
separate. The second repetition is identical with the 
dance described above, and in the last repetition the 
sides again come to the center square. 



Sides Divide 

THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 
All join hands and circle to the 

left, 

Break and swing and promenade 
back. 

2. a) First and third forward 

And the 

b> 



c) Fir$t an$ t^ird forward 
And $h@ : *cte? <34mde 




And 



SIDES DIVIDE 

d) First and third forward and the sides divide. 
Change at the center 

And swing the sides. 

e) First and third forward 
And the sides divide. 
Change at the center 
And swing the sides. 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing. 

With a left aUemande and a right hand grand, 
Meet your partners and promenade. 



315 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First and third couples advance to each other. As they 

do so the individuals of the second and fourth couples 
separate from each other and stand at the outside 
corners of the set, 
b) The first gentleman takes the third lady by both hands 




Change and &win(i the center and swing the sides. 



316 RUN AWAY TO ALABAM' 

and exchanges places with her, and these two back up 
into the fourth couple's position. The third gentleman 
does the same with the first lady and finishes in second 
couple's position. At the same time the second gentle 
man and the fourth lady meet, swing (two hands) and 
remain at the first position while the second lady 
and the fourth gentleman do the same at the third 
position. 

c) Those occupying first and third position advance to 
center and those in second and fourth position sepa 
rate, and they all swing and change position and 
partners as in (b). 

d) Those standing in first and third position now ad 
vance to center, and the others proceed as in (c) . 

e) This repetition (same as (c) ) brings each dancer 
to his own partner and back to his own position. 

3. See page 153 or substitute any other ending given there. 

This can be danced by having the regular swing (twice 
around in dance position) each time instead of the two-hand 
swing. 

Run Away to Alabam' 

THE CALL: 

1. All eight balance, all eight swing. 
A left allemande and a right hand 

grand, 

Meet your partners and 
promenade. 

2. a) Now swing, swing, and every 

body swing. 

b) Swing them ladies to the center 
And let f em 

c) G$nt$ rm 

wrfmqr and swing the newt. 
(jbi) ml (c) itee* more time, f cw times 
ft ii$ la&f ^petitions calli^ * , , 




RUN AWAY TO ALABAM* 317 

3. Promenade Indian style. 

Lady in the lead and single file. 
Stop and siving her once in awhile. 

Repeat three more times or until straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 except this time with men to the 

center, calling: 

Gents to the center. 
And let f em stand. 
Gals run away to Alabam 9 . 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) Everyone swings his partner vigorously. 

b) The girls are swung off to the center of the set where 
they stand back to back. 

c) The men all circle to the right around them (in single 
file and without holding hands) and continue past 




Let 'em stand and the gents run away to Alabam'. 



318 THE OCEAN WAVE 

their partners to the next lady with whom they 
swing. 

They repeat this until they come to their original 
partners and swing them back to the home position. 

3. See page 159 or substitute any other ending given there. 



The Ocean Wave 

(Requiring careful teamwork and careful timing.) 
THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the ^~~ 

Wt, (^ 

Break and siving and promenade ^-^ 
back. 

2. a) First couple out to the right, 

b) Wave the ocean, wave the sea, 
Wave that pretty girl back to 

me. 

c) Wave the ocean, wave the shore, 
Wave this time and a-ivave no more. 

d) On to the next and the second folloiv up. 

e) Wave the ocean, wave the sea, 
Wave that pretty girl back to me. 
Wave the ocean, wave the shore, 
Wave this time and a-wave no more. 

f ) On to the next and the third follow up. 

g) Wave the ocean, wave the sea, 
Wave that-pretty girl back to me. 
Wave the ocean, wave the shore. 
Wave this time and Or-wave no more. 

h) $($nce fyome and everybody 



S. W alfemi^ Uftwtfk f<mr left hand. 
to 



Repeat for 90003^ *Mr<i, ai4 f oiirfh 



THE OCEAN WAVE 



319 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple. 

b) First couple passes between them, the lady circling 
around the second man and the gentleman circling 
around the second lady. The first couple meets in the 
center and swings once around. 

c) They again pass through and circle the second couple 
exactly as in (b). They meet and swing a second 
time, 

d) They advance to the third couple and on the words 
"second follow up" the second couple swings once 
in place (in order to give first couple the proper in 
terval of lead), and then the second couple follows 
the first. 

e) The first couple passes through and around the third 
couple swinging always when they come back to 
gether exactly as in (b) and (c) . This time the second 




(First couple passing through third couple while second couple is 

swinging.) 



320 THE OCEAN WAVE 

couple follows them through and around the third, 
swinging in the same way but timing the swings and 
passage so as not to interfere with the other couple. 

f ) The first couple after their second swing advances to 
the fourth couple. While they do so the second couple 
executes their second swing and on the words "third 
follow up" the third couple swings in place (in order 
to give the second couple the proper lead) and then 
follows the others to the fourth couple. 

g) Now a procession of three couples passes between and 
around the fourth couple exactly as in (b) and (c) 
and each couple swinging each time they meet in the 
center. With a little care and careful timing, there 
will be no confusion or collisions on the part of good 
dancers. Each must make a good large circle out and 
around the fourth lady and fourth gentleman, in order 
to leave adequate time for the other couples to swing. 
And each couple must be careful not to come together 
between the swinging couple and the fourth couple, 
but come in from the side or even a little behind from 
a good large circle, before they take their swing. 

h) Each couple takes the final swing and returns to 
place. However, if the first couple swings directly to 
place, they are apt to collide with the second gentle 
man who at that time is coming in from the side to 
meet his lady. So, if the first couple swings directly 
back or towards the second couple's position and then 
around to its own place, this collision can be avoided. 
The second couple, of course, goes naturally to its 
own position and thus avoids collision with the third. 
While the third swings to place, the fourth couple 
which has been patiently standing till now also swings 
in place, and all are ready for the ep<Jing. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 




THE CALL: 



POKEY NINE 



Pokey Nine 



321 




C EXTR.-A 




\J 



1. AH ei#M balance, all eight swing, 

A left allemande, and a right hand grand, 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

2. a) First couple balance, first couple swing, 

Lady go right and the gent go left. 
b) Three by three in a pokey -nine, 
Three by three in a pokey-oh, 
Three by three and on you go! 




Three by three in a pokey nine. 



322 POKEY NINE 

c) The lady go on and the gent catch up. 

d) Three by three in a pokey-nine, 
Three by three in a pokey-oh, 
Three by three and on you go. 

e) The lady go on and gent catch up. 
Three by three in a pokey-nine, 
Three by three in a pokey-oh, 
Three by three and on you go. 

f ) The lady stay there and the gent catch up. 
Noiv circle four, oh, circle four. 

g) And docey-doe ivith the gent you know, 
The lady go C and the gent go doe. 

3. Balance home and swing 'em all night, 
Allemande left go left and right, 
Some'll go right and some'll go le-e-ft. 
Promenade, oh, promenade. 

Repeat for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) The first lady and gentleman step back from each 

other four steps, then come together and swing. The 
lady then goes right to the second couple and the 
gentleman turns left to the fourth couple. 

b) The first lady and second couple join hands and the 
three circle to the left. At the same time the first 
gentleman and the fourth couple circle three in the 
same way. And often the caller joins the third couple 
making another circle of three and dances while he 
goes on with the call. Any odd person from the side 
lines joins the third couple of each other set, so that 
in each set there will be three circles of three each 
for a "pokey-nine." After the word pokey-oh tfeey all 
reverse and circle right. 

c) T;be lady advances to the thir<| ewple, tb^ gentleman 
advices te the ^ecoad, and t&e callet or the odd 
peimra ip eacfc .qgt ^v&Bce to th^ I wrth. 

d) *$&* librae circle twn left agala and tbseii reverse &s 
i (b). 



POKEY NINE 323 

e) The first lady advances to the fourth couple, the 
gentleman to the third, and the caller to the second, 
and they circle threes again as in (b). 

f) The lady remains with the fourth couple while the 
gentleman advances and joins her there. And the 
caller or the odd dancer drops out of the set. The first 
and fourth couples with hands joined circle four to 
the left, while the other two couples stand stilL 

g) They then do a docey-doe (see page 160 for a descrip 
tion). 

3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



The cowboy pokey is a distant and disinherited relative 
of the elegant polka. In this dance it has completely for 
gotten its great grandmother, and is nothing but the gliding 
walk of the regular square dance. 



324 THE SINGING QUADRILLE 

The Singing Quadrille 

To be sung to special music 

THE CALL: 

1. a) Dos-a-dos your corners 

b) Dos-a-dos your partners. 

c) Allemande left your corner s f 

d) Allemande right your partners 
And siving them twice around. 

e) Balance to your corners. 

f ) Siving your corner lady 
And promenade the hall 

Repeat three more times. 

2. g) First couple down center 

And there they divide. 

The lady goes right 

And the gent he goes left, 
h) Balance your corner 
j) And don't be afraid. 
k) Dip to your partner 

And waltz promenade. 
Repeat for second, third, and fourth couples. 




SINGING QUADRILLE PART ONE 
Dos-a-dos your 



THE SINGING QUADRILLE 325 

3. 1) All join hands and circle 

To the left around the hall, 

To the little old log cabin in the lane. 
m) Whoa, you're all going wrong. 

Go back the other way 

To the little old log cabin in the lane. 
n) Places now, and balance all f 

And everybody swing 

To the little old log cabin in the lane, 
o) Your left hand on your corners 

And your partners by the right 

And a grand right and left half around. 
p) The first one by the right hand, 

And the next one by the left 

To the little old log cabin in the lane, 
q) And ivhen you meet your partner 

Take your homeivard flight 

To the little old log cabin in the lane, lane, lane! 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. a) Each gentleman faces the lady to his left and com 
pletely encircles her and returns to place without 
changing the direction in which he is facing. She at 




SINGING QUADEILLE PART TWO 

The lady goes right and the gent he goes left. 



326 



THE SINGING QUADRILLE 



the same time in the same way advances and encircles 
him. They pass right shoulders, sidestep to the right 
passing back to back, and pass left shoulders in re 
turning to place. 

b) Each gentleman turns around and does exactly the 
same as (a) with his own partner. 

c) Each gentleman joins left hands with his left-hand 
or corner lady, and circles around her and back to 
place. 

d) Each gentleman now joins right hands with his part 
ner and circles twice around her (in order to fill out 
the measure of the music) . 

e) Each gentleman and his corner lady advance and bow 
to each other. 

f ) Each gentleman takes his corner lady in dance posi 
tion and swings her around and then promenades with 
her around the square and back to his position. She, 
however, has left her position and advanced one place. 
(By the last repetition of the figure she has worked 
back to her own partner again.) 

2. g) The first couple waltzes down the center of the set 
to the third couple and waltzes between them. Here 




SINGING QUADRIIXJE^PART TttitEE 
Your left hand on your corner. 



THE SINGING QUADRILLE 327 

they separate and the lady then waltzes to the right 
around the square, while the gentleman turns to the 
left. 

h) Almost back to their own positions each turns and 
makes a deep bow to their corner. The inactive corners 
bow to each other at the same time. 

j) All four gentlemen now turn to their own partners 
and make a deep bow. 

k) They take their partners in dance position and dip 
back on their left feet, the women rocking forward on 
their right feet. (Each rises on the toe of this foot and 
then sinks ; the one-two-three count becoming, step 
rise fall.) The couples then waltz around the square, 
timing it carefully to be back for the next repetition. 

3. 1) All eight join hands and circle around to the left, 
m) On the word ''whoa/' they suddenly stop (and if they 
feel dramatic, look very hurt and surprised). Then 
each gentleman takes his partner in promenade posi 
tion, and they march back to their own places. 

n) Here each gentleman and his partner step back from 
each other four steps with a flourish, and then come 
together and swing twice around. 

o) Each gentleman then swings his left-hand lady once 
around with his left hand (a regular allemande left) 
gives his right hand to his partner and does a regular 
right and left grand. However, since in a Western 
right and left grand each gentleman meets his partner 
in the opposite position (couple number one meets at 
number three's position) and there promenades with 
her, according to the old tradition, this is only a half 
right and left. In the olden times it would have had to 
continue on until he met her again in their own home 
position before they promenaded. 

p) Therefore he now takes his partner by the right hand. 
They each pause a momeirt and make a deep eurtey. 
They then eOntii^ie the right and left and meet again 
at their own position. 

d) Here tbiy take their partners in promenade position 
a|i(i niapii around the 



SINGING QUADRILLE 
Figure I 



i 



Dos-a doY your cor- 



ner 






^i - 

Pos-a-do$ your part-ner 







^F 




Al-le-manJ left your cor-ner 




rir r p 



/\(-(e-7nand right your part-ner And svmg her twee a.-round . 




r n| r J 



l-ance io your cor-ner 






your cor- Tier la- dy Andprom-e-nadetkcfia.il, 
JJ} | J J)=k=T=E 




Rgure II 






^^ 



&~ 



there ikc 






\ X ^-.g*' 'm! 


^^1^--: 


^1^>1' h 


i J 




r '::f^r;.^-f 






!^\)^ : ^' 7 '- r '^ : 
i , , , , , 


^r-n ,| 


: ;^:^.f^.;4-J 


rj : ^:.l 




,Jt:M ; -'g: : 


;-p- ^ . 





SINGING QUADRILLE 

Figure III 



329 




All join hands and cir-ck to the left a-round the hail, Jo ike 



JIJ-1J.N If \ 



L i t-tle Old Log Cabin w ihe Lane* you. are ait ao-mti 



f3 

* 



backike otk-er way To the lii-ilt Old Log 



(f^P J * ^ 



Cabin m the Lane. Pid-ces nov erne/ bal- a nee all and 




ev-'ry bod-y s^i\\a } To the Lit-tle OldLw Cab-m m tke 




Lane you r left hand en yew ccm^ and your part-ner by your 







1 



~_X ^^ 

nght **duQu grdnd rM and Lett half a- round. 




First by the rty/it hand anJ -ntxtone by tke tffi , To tke. 



Ld-tU QJdLoj Cab-m m the Lane, 



Antf 




Lit tie 0U U<f Ca&^n in the Lane. 



330 



SINGING QUADRILLE 



Figure IV 



Oh the first and third Gents to 

fe 




Pass 'em by the right A*ielpass'&rn by the left Nou swmy 'em 



S 



^ 



round And back to your own t All swing that 






side you, A/o*/ oass'em bythe riyAt And pajs'ern buthe 



^ 



left hkhni bear doun etqkt and -mind ycu All 




htnct And SLn-jUprom-e-wade All suinythat girl he- 



hind UOLL . 



NOTE: Many musicians play eight bars instead of the last sixteen 
bars as written above, while the dancers waltz arotind the square. In 
this case it is best to play the first four bars as written in the top line 
at the very beginning of the music above, them the 13th to 16th bars 
instead of the last sixteen Jws as written. 



WALTZ THAT GIRL BEHIND YOU 

Waltz That Girl Behind You 



331 



TUNE: The Girl I Left Behind Me, in waltz time can be used as part 
four of the Singing Quadrille. See previous page. 

The whole dance is done with a waltz step and a pronounced dip on 
the first beat of each measure. 




Br T-ttE JLIG4IT 

JOIN LETT-HANDS 






e>r T-HE LEFT 
THE CALL: 

a) First and third gents 
To the opposite ladies. 

b) Pass 'em by the right 
Pass 'em by the left, 

c) Siving 'em around 
And back to your own. 

d) All swing that girl beside you. 

e) Pass 'em by the right 
Pass 'em by the left f) 

f ) Now bear down eight and mind ** ' 

you. ""*' 

g) Spin 'em behind <m4 #wgtb promenade, 
|i) Then waltz tho$ : ff$rl beMnd you. 

foiirth 




fourth 



a few of the lines were given us by an old 
caller who t fea4 fory otte^t tHe (Jance. From his suggestions we 



332 



WALTZ THAT GIRL BEHIND YOU 



worked out the dance as given above and in this half- 
original form it is a great favorite with our dancers. Bear 
down eight is one of his phrases which we have retained, 
but for beginners, to whom you are teaching the dance 
circle eight would be more easily understood than the origi 
nal phrase. In singing this to waltz time the caller will find 
himself adding the syllable, "ah" to many of the words in 
order to hold the rhythm as : 

''Pass 'em by the right-ah! 
Pass 'em by the left-ah!" 

This adds to the charm of the call. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

a) The first and third gentlemen waltz across the set 
to the opposite ladies and take the places of each other. 

b) Each faces the opposite lady, and the lady and gen 
tleman, starting with the right foot, advance with a 
waltz step to each other, taking right hands and pas 
sing. They make a half turn back with a sort of 
waltz-balance step on the second measure. They pass 
each other touching left hands on the third, and turn 
back on the fourth. 

c) The first and third gentlemen swing the opposite 
ladies once around with two waltz steps, and with 
four waltz steps return to places. 




Pass >em by the left. 



WALTZ THAT GIRL BEHIND YOU 333 

d) All four gentlemen swing their own partners with a 
waltz step on the last words of this phrase. 

e) All four gentlemen face their partners, and, starting 
with the right foot, advance with a waltz step touch 
ing right hands, pass each other and turn back on a 
waltz-balance step, pass each other, touching left 
hands on the third measure, and turn back to each 
other with a waltz-balance step. 

f ) They all join hands in a large circle and with a pro 
nounced dip take four waltz steps to the left. 

g) Each lady lets go the gentleman in back of her and, 
still holding her partner's right hand in her own left, 
she is swung by him toward the center of the circle, 
once under his arm (rotating leftabout-face) to give 
her a complete spin and to a position beyond him in 
the circle. They let go hands and all dance to right 
around the circle in single file with a waltz step. 

h) Each gentleman turns outward from the circle (to 
the right) and back to the girl behind him (his own 
partner still) and waltzes with her. (It is better if all 
four couples do a waltz balance dip at the same time 
before waltzing. See page 100.) 

The music now repeats (e), (f), (g), and (h) 
(sixteen measures) and in this time each couple have 
waltzed once around the set, (in promenade direction 
and all rotating to the right) and should be back in 
their own positions ready for the next repetition. 



Pass 'em by the right 
And pass 'em by left 

offers enough difficulty that it may merit a more detailed 
analysis of the f ootwprt The lady and gentleman each use 
identical footworfe. 

Advance toward youpir p&rfiaer with a right step (at the 
same time clasping right tiaifccfe) > step OB beyond with a left 
step, and close tibe right fp4t to the left Now step on be 
yond with a ie$> b^t |>et tills I<tf t foot down at right angles to 
fts of mpfeix and potat&g directly to your right. Then 
ou! *%M toififce $$$e of ywir left turning: as you do so, 
pit ywr iff! ttowte %ain IB its same position but point- 



334 WALTZ THAT GIRL BEHIND YOU 

Ing directly backward to your previous, line of motion. As 
you have taken these last steps you have let go right hands 
with your partner. 

You are now facing your partner again and you clasp 
left hands with her as you step forward again on your right 
foot. Step on beyond with your left foot and close your right 
to your left. Step on beyond with your left, turning left face 
as you do so and placing the left foot at a ninety-degree 
angle with your previous line of motion. Now a short-balance 
step with the right on beyond your left as you complete the 
turn. And place your left down again in the same position 
but again reversed and pointing back to your partner with 
whom you have again broken hand holds. 

That is, the partners take right hands, waltz by each 
other, and do a rightabout-face. Then they take left hands, 
waltz by, and do a leftabout-face, always starting toward 
each other with a right step. As they become smoother they 
become less geometrically accurate and more graceful and 
natural in their footwork. 



Intermingling 
Dances 



With two or more sets Involved. 



336 



GRAND MAECH CHANGE 

Grand March Change 



(All the sets should be in one row down the middle of the floor, for 
the length of the hall.) 



BY 
COUPUE TUP.N Wcni A LEFT PIVOT TUH.N 




-AfLbOIL, 



THE CALL: 



1. All eight balance, all eight siving, 

A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) First couple "balance, 

First couple swing. 
First couple promenade 
The inside ring 
And face the ivall. 

b) Second couple balance, 
Second couple swing. 
Second couple promenade 
The inside ring 

And face the wall. 

c) Ends move forward 
And sides fall in. 

d) M^rch! The ladies go right 
And the gent$ go left. 

e) L&dies cirele inside 
Gmts cirele out; 

f ) Now $ent$ Circle inside 



Down the Qtmttf two b*y two. 



GRAND MARCH CHANGE 



337 



h) 



Open your lines 

As you open a book. 

Forward all, fall back all. 

Pass right over to the opposite wall. 

Forward all, all fall back, 

Pass right over to the same old track. 

Forward again and take your own. 

March! Column right around the hall. 

Now serpentine and see 'em alL 
1) Noiv down the center with an arbor way, 

'Til you're back in line in the same old way. 

Now first couple right 

And the second couple left. 

And down the center four by four. 

First four right 

And the second four left. 

And doivn the center eight by eight. 
o) Each couple turn with a left pivot swing, 

And march right back. 

Now backivard march, 



j) 



k) 



m) 
n) 



P) 



And circle eight. 




Down tfoe center four by four. 



338 GRAND MARCH CHANGE 

q) First and second couple right and left through, 
And the sides the same. Right and left back. 

r) Now the tiuo ladies change, 
And change right back. 

s) Now half promenade, 
And right and left home. 

3. Now swing, swing, and swing 'em all day. 
Nou) allemande left in the same old way, 
And right and left grand around the ring 
Hand over hand ivith the dear little thing. 
Promenade, oh, promenade. 

This can be repeated with the second, third, and fourth 
couples leading, each time marching in a different direction, 
or it can be followed directly by any other dance the caller 
may choose. 

THE EXPLANATION : 

1. See page 151 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) The first lady and gentleman separate four steps 

from each other and swing. They then promenade 
around the set inside the other three couples, and 
finish in their original position but facing the opposite 
direction, or "towards the wall" with their backs to 
the center of the set. 

b) The second couple does the same except that they stop 
directly behind the first couple facing in the same way 
as the first couple. 

c) The third couple steps forward and stands directly 
behind these two and the fourth couple moves over and 
.gets in line behind the third couple. This puts all the 
sets on the floor lined up in a column of couples. 

d) They all march, forgetting their sets and making one 
tong column. The ladies turn to the right and the 
gentlemen to the left and each single file circles 
around; the outside of the hall. 

e) When they meet at the foot of the hall the ladies pass 
to the inside and the two files continue past each other. 



GRAND MARCH CHANGE 339 

f ) When they meet at the head of the hall, the two lines 
pass each other again, this time with the men circling 
on the inside of the ladies. 

g) When the two columns meet at the foot of the hall 
they march up the center two by two, with the ladles 
back on the same side, to the right of the gentlemen, 
as when they started. 

h) As soon as the double column fills the length of the 
hall, they stop. The men and women face each other 
and take four steps backward, separating the two 
lines. 

j) The two lines advance to each other four steps and 
separate again. They advance and the two lines pass 
through each other (each person touching his partner 
by the right hand in passing so as to pass to the left) 
and continuing on until each line stands in place of 
the other. Each individual does a rightabout and the 
two lines advance to each other again and fall back 
again. Then they advance and pass through to their 
own places. They all do a rightabout and face each 
other again, and the two lines advance and form a 
double column again facing the front of the hall. 

k) The column marches to the head of the hall turns 
right and marches around the wall to the foot. It 
marches clear across the foot of the hall and then 
doubles back on itself, so that every couple passes 
every other marching in the opposite direction. At 
the other side it can double bade again ai*d tiras 
"serpentine" as long as desired. 

1) On the command the e^ltimn turag down center* The 
first couple face each olfeer ? jofc 6piJ& ? &B<! fee others 
pass uncter tfeeir |6iped hands. 44:000*1 as'Ute $eoj*d 
eottpte'p$a$e& toite ttey too |^li| haiife Then, the 
tfcirci '3p&eh eocip fe In fym> a&9M0 *& it passes under 
last p&it ^ol.-fca^fe^'^te 1&&; txrtdge longer for 
^p|. Wbjffft *$' ' have "passed 

by the 

^ now reformed, 



and t& aeeond couple left 
the opposite direction, so 
either wall. 



340 GRAND MARCH CHANGE 

n) The couples come together at the foot of the hall, and 
inarch four abreast up the middle, when they reach the 
head the first four turn right and the second left, and 
so on alternately, forming two columns of four each, 
marching along the side walls. At the foot the fours 
pivot and meet and march up the center eight abreast. 

o) On the command they stop and each couple pivots in 
place, the girl circling left around her man who turns 
in position as a pivot and the new-formed lines of 
eight now march back toward the foot of the hall. 

p) Then on command they all remain facing toward the 
foot of the hall and at the same time march backward 
toward the head of the hall. Then the two ends of 
each group of eight bend around together and they 
make a ring of eight with hands joined, and all circle 
to the left. 

q) The first and second couple in each set face each 
other (and at the same time the third and fourth do 
the same) and pass through each other, each giving 
the opposite person the right hand in passing, and 
each couple joining left hands as soon as they have 
passed through. Each man holding his lady's left 
hand, puts his right hand behind her back, and turns 
her leftabout-face around him. The two couples pass 
back through each other, turn in the same way and are 
again back where they were, facing each other. 

r) The two men stand and send their ladies to the center 
between them. The ladies take right hands and pass 
each other, giving their left hands to the opposite 
men. Each man takes the lady with his left hand, puts 
his right behind her waist and pivoting, turns her 
completely around him to the left and back towards 
her own partner. As the ladies pass they again take 
right hands and give their lefts to their partner?, who 
pivot again and turn them to place. 

s) Each couple BOW takes promenade position (hands 
joined in front with partner) and marches to the 
couples place (passing to the right gentlemen 
left shoulder^) . They pivot Qimct Mt face 



INSIDE ARCH 



341 



3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



Inside Arch 





THE CALL: 

1. All eight balance. 
All eight swing, 
A left allemande 
And a right hand grand. 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 




ill eight balance. 



342 INSIDE ARCH 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right 

With a four and a half. 

b) 1. Inside arch and the outside under. 

2. Inside arch and the outside under. 

3. Inside arch and the outside under. 

4. Inside arch and the outside under. 

c) Now circle four with the odd couple oh, 
Around and around and a docey-doe. 

d) Now on to the next with a four and a half. 

e) 1. Inside arch and outside under. 

2. Inside arch and outside under. 

3. Inside arch and outside under. 

4. Inside arch and outside under. 

3. Balance home and swing 'em all night, 
Allemande left, go left and right. 
Hand over hand around the ring, 

Hand over hand with the dear little thing. 

Meet your partner and promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples, 
or substitute the next dance for second and fourth 
couples "the length of the hall." 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 or substitute any other introduction given 
there. 

2. a) The first couple advances to the second couple. They 

join hands and the four circle halfway round so that 
the first couple stops with backs to the outside of the 
set and the second couple with backs to the center of 
the set. 

b) 1. The second couple raises their arched arms and the 
first couple, holding hands, passes under the arch. 
The first couple continues across the set and raises 
arched arms* and the fourth couple passes pi^der. 
Tbe f ourtfe couple continues and arches, and the 
(wfco fa^ve turned around j& the meantime) 

and tlie first 
to the 




INSIDE ARCH AND OUTSIDE UNDER 



343 



(This leaves the second couple In the fourth couple's 
place, and the fourth couple In the second couple's 
place temporarily.) 

c) The first couple now advances to the third (who have 
stood inactive and unhappy until now) and joining 
hands circles to the left with them. Then they do a 
docey-doe (see page 160). 

d) They now advance to the position of the fourth couple 
(but the second couple is now standing in this posi 
tion). They join hands and circle half around with 
them as in (a). They then do exactly as they did in 
(b 1, 2, 3, 4) , which puts the second and fourth couple 
back in their own positions, and the first couple 
in the center of the set. With a balance bow they 
return to their place. 

3, See page 154 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



Arch and Under for the Length of the Hall 

(Continued) 
THE CALL: 

2. a) Second and fourth couples go out to the right 

, And four hands full around. 
b) Heads all arch and feet duck under, 
GO, my boys, and go like thunder. 
Keep on going till you reach the wall 
Then turn right back and through 'em all 




Inside areh and outside under for the length" of the hall. 



344 ARCH AND UNDER 

Now touch the wall at the other end 

And turn back through till you're home again. 

Duck and dive, duck and dive, 

Pep up boys and act alive. 

Duck and dive, duck and dive, 

Regular old time cattle drive. 

Duck and dive, duck and dive, 

Some'll batch and some'll wive. 

Duck and dive, duck and dive, 

Cost a one spot, worth a five. 

Duck and dive, duck and dive, 

Keep on ducking 'til you arrive. 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing. 
A left allemande and a right hand grand. 
And promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for fourth couple. 

B 

In calling the two preceding dances, it makes a nice 
combination to let couple one do inside arch and outside 
under within the set, then couples two and four do it for the 
length of the hall, then couple three do it again within the 
set. 

You will note there is no introduction or Part 1 to this 
call since it starts with couple number two and usually 
follows some other figure (preferably the preceding dance) 
done by the first couple. 

This dance for the length of the hall is usually done, alas, 
with only the second couple going out to the right and the 
fourth couple remaining inactive. It was so given in the first 
edition of this book, since I had seen it danced in no other 
way. But this leads to inevitable collisions and disputes as to 
who shall go over and who shall go under. The more com 
plicated your traffic rules become the more insistent each 
collider gets that he is right. At last the obvious dawns. 
Twice as many couples are going one way as are iroinjg the 
other, ^Hf timjfic rule can keep fiem oat of trouble. 

If tlfie^l the second ftn4 fourth eonple^ txrtb. go tot to 
the ri^'llty^ ;-wS|Jf $ J^fcty' i^tpte going ope way a$ the 

We feead e^pfe arch over, 




foot 



ARCH AND UNDER 

couple, arch under. Now by alternating over and under, 
keeping the spacing even, and by careful timing, it all goes 
as smoothly as clockwork, and is great fun. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

2. a) Second couple advances to third couple, joins hands, 
and the four circle full around, so the second couple is 
left toward the center of the set. At the same time 
the fourth couple advance to the first couple, join 
hands and they circle full around, leaving the fourth 
couple toward the center of the set. All four couples 
are in a line with all the other couples down the hall, 
b) The first and second couples raise their arched hands 
and the third and fourth couples make ready to pass 
under. On the word GO they pass through and ad 
vance right on toward the oncoming couples of the 
next set. If they have just arched over, they now 
duck under, then over with the next, then under, and 
so on and on. In a few moments the whole line has 
slipped into a continuous flow so that every couple 
passes alternately over and under each other couple 
coming from the opposite direction. 

When a couple reaches the end of the hall they 
turn (the couple pivoting) and accept the rhythm of 
the oncoming couple. That is, they go either over or 
under to accommodate the motion of the oncoming 
couple. This puts them in the correct rhythm to pass 
back the length of the hall alternately over and under. 
Paeh ccmgfe moet co^ttiBue in the direction they 
were facing at the time of the first over or umder. 
They'iOTst eonrtfeue in tibis direction until they re^eh 
the end of the iiaJL ; fjte they tirii around aiMi go 
under in the opposite |!etfe!n to ihe other end of the 
hall And tfeeit fley fate! a$d f eterfa to their original 
places on the floor* 

Fix to th$ iippd-of e^eh couple that they i$iist go 
to both ends of tijie I&tttitii^ ret&zti to place before they 
have done. 

The $^ck-an4-$!ve patter, or something Ijtfce it can 
be fceipt g&ibf |>y the ealler, or he ean settle doWn for 
; & to^f^'fw^ 1 all .MiplfS are baclt in place. , 

S. See pe 1^1 for ^ptaation or substitute any other 
there. 



346 



THREE LADIES CHANGE 

Three Ladies Change 







/ 



0- 



THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left, 
Break and siving and promenade back. 

2. a) First couple out to the couple on the right 

With a four hands full around. 
b) The two ladies change, 
Now three ladies change 
On the longer track, 
Three ladies change 
Through the set and back. 
The three gents stand 
Like a rock in the s&a 




Three ladies change. 



THREE LADIES CHANGE 347 

And wave them past 

Till they've changed all three. 

c) On to the next and circle four. 

Two ladies change and change right back; 

d) On to the next and 
Four hands full around 

Repeat (b) entire for fourth couple. 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing, 

Allemande left with your left hand. 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 

Then promenade, oh, promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples, 
or substitute the dance on the next page for the 
second and fourth couples. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First couple advances to second couple, joins hands 

with them and the four circle to the left one full time 
around, so that the first couple is left again toward 
the center of the set. 

b) -The first and second ladies pass each other, taking 
right hands. Each gives her left hand to the opposite 
gentleman. The first lady is turned once around by the 
second gentleman so she again faces the set. The 
second lady gives her left hand to the first gentleman 




Three ladies change the length of the halL 



348 THREE LADIES CHANGE 

who passes her to the other side of himself, where she 
advances and gives her right hand to the fourth lady 
who advances to meet her, then her left to the fourth 
man. She turns around him and faces the set. The 
first man takes the fourth lady and passes her on so 
that she joins left hands with the oncoming first lady. 
Each lady continues in this serpentine fashion from 
one side of the set to the other and back to where 
she started from, giving her right hand always to 
ladies and her left hand to the gentlemen, encircling 
both the fourth and second men and passing by the 
first man (who stands in the center) with only a half 
turn to the left for each lady. 

The second and fourth man takes each lady as she 
comes to him by the left hand, turns her out around 
him and back into the set again. The first man, stand 
ing in the center, keeps turning perpetually to his 
left, taking a lady with his left haml from one side of 
the set to the other with each half turn. 

c) When all the ladies are back to their own partners 
again, the first couple advances to the third couple, 
wjio have stood inactive thus far. Ladies join right 
hands and pass each other, then give their left hands 
to the opposite men, who turn around with them and 
send them again towards each other. Again they take 
right hands and pass and each gives her left hand to 
her partner, who with his right hand behind her back, 
turns her around to place. 

d) The first couple then advances to the fourth couple 
an4 does with them exactly as they did with the 
second couple in section (b). The three ladies take 
the serpentine route around the men until each comes 
back to her own partner. 

3. See page 152 or substitute any other ending given there. 



POUR LADIES CHANGE THE LENGTH OP THE HALL 349 

Four Ladies Change the Length of the Hall 

(Continued) 

(Can be substituted for the second and fourth couples Instead of 
the simpler form in the preceding dance, provided there are two or 
more sets in a row down the center of the hall.) 

THE CALL: 

2. a) The second and fourth couples 

Go out to the right 
With four hands full around. 
b) The two ladies change, 
The three ladies change 
To the walls and back, 
All ladies change on this longer track. 
Keep on changing till you reach a wall 
You're just half through, that isn't all 
Turn right back and keep on trotting, 
Keep on changing to the other wall 
Now back to your partner if he ain't forgotten. 

3. Now you're home and everybody swing, 
Allemande ho t 

Right hand up and here we go! 
Now promenade. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for fourth couple. 



If the sets are arranged the length of the hall it Is best 
to give the simpler dance (see page 346) for couple number 
one, and keep them changing within the set. Then call the 
dance given above for couples two and four, sending the 
several sets the length of the hall. Then repeat the simple 
dance for the third couple. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

2. a) Second couple in ^ach s^t advances to the third couple, 
joins hands with them and circle to the left once 
aratad is0 fb$t the second couple is ^gain toward the 
set. } At the same time the fourth couple 
If tlm $r$i eopple and do0s the same with 
couple in line toward the 
te of 



350 FOUR LADIES CHANGE THE LENGTH OF THE HALL 

b) The second and third ladies advance to each other, 
take right hands, pass by each other, and give their left 
hands to the left hands of the opposite gentlemen. 
Each gentleman turns half around with the lady so 
that she continues in the same direction toward the 
next man, even though he is in the next set. She 
takes alternately a lady with the right hand, then a 
man with the left, and continues thus until she reaches 
the wall at the end of the hall, having passed through 
all the sets. Here the last man turns her around and 
sends her back through the line again. 

Each man takes a lady coming one direction with 
his left hand, makes a half turn with her, sending her 
on in the same direction, and then takes a lady coming 
from the other direction and gives her a half turn. 
This makes him turn continuously to the left. 

The two men at the extreme ends of the hall each 
take an oncoming lady, and turn her completely 
around themselves and back into the line again. The 
end gentlemen make a full turn each time (but only 
half as often as the line men) and always turn to their 
left. 

Each lady must go to each end of the hall and be 
turned back by both of these end men before returning 
to her partner to stop at the end of the figure. 

3. See page 153 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



If there are enough sets on the floor, this same dance 
through all the crosswise sets can be done, jut as described 
above for the lengthwise. 



RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH THE LENGTH OF HALL 351 

Right and Left Through the Length of 

the Hall 

THE CALL: 

1. All eight balance. 
All eight swing, 
A left allemande f 

And a right hand grand, 
Meet your partner 
And promenade. 

2. a) First and third couple 

Forward and back. 

b) Now right and left through the length of the hall. 
And the sides the same. 

Now right and left back to the other wall. 
And the sides keep shuttling back and forth, 
Going east and west through their south and north. 

c) Keep on shuttling till you get back home, 

3. Now swing, swing, and everybody swing. 
Allemande left ivith your left hand, 

Right to your partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

This call can be repeated with some modification for the 
second and fourth couples. It would begin : 




Eight <&nd left the length of the halL 



352 RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH THE LENGTH OF HALL 

a) Second and fourth couples 
Forward and back 

b) Now right and left through the width of the hall 
And the ends the same, etc. 



THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) First and third couples advance four steps toward 

each other, then fall back four steps to places. 

b) The first and third couples advance to each other and 
each person takes the opposite by the right hand and 
passes beyond him or her. (This means you must pass 
your opposite to the left.) As soon as the two couples 
pass through each other in this way, partners take 
each other by the left hand, and advance toward the 
oncoming couple from the next set. 

As soon as the first and third couples pass through 
each other, the second and fourth couples pass through 
each other in the same way, but crosswise of the hall. 
The first and third couples of each set keep going 
in the same manner until each couple has been to both 
end walls and is back in place again. Taking the on 
coming couples by the right hands and joining left 
hands with your partner after passing each couple 
gives rise to a peculiar action which is soon naturally 
and effectively exaggerated into a swing of the right 
hands back and up over the shoulder in a long sweep 
ing curve, timing so they meet the next couple just 
right. 

When a couple reaches the end or side of the hall, 
map stands as a pivot aad swings htfe lady around 
in a left tern and them tifeey xetttni dow^i the liqe. 
itf otirtli eo^pftw grata* tart taefc in 




<j) : # 
Iff 

walls, soft |he wlnbite ciasfe 



RIGHT AND LEFT THROUGH THE LENGTH OF HALL 353 

and fascinating. Four sets arranged in a square work 
out perfectly and symmetrically; but if the arrange 
ment of sets is longer one way than the other, and 
uneven, when one pair of couples gets back home the 
other pair in that set may be wandering almost any 
where on the floor. In this case the first pair of 
couples back home have to shuttle back and forth 
within the set until their two neighbor couples are 
back home also. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other 
ending. 

COMBINATION: 

For a complex and delightful combination of intermingl 
ing dances (especially fine for exhibitions) the Grand March 
Change can be called for the first couple, the Arch and 
Under the Length of the Hall for the second and fourth 
couples, then the Right and Left Through the Length of the 
Hall for the first and third couples and finally the Four 
Ladies Change for the Length of the Hall. By this time they 
will all know they have been some place, but they will feel 
quite triumphant and proud. 



Original 
Dances 



To keep this art vital, each caller must invent a few dances of 
his own. The following dances of my own invention, are 
included, not for their excellence but as a challenge 
for other callers to do better. The first and 
fourth use familiar figures in a new pat 
tern, the second and third are built 
upon figures derived from 
European folk dances. 



356 FORWARD AND BACK EIGHT 

Forward and Back Eight 

THE CALL: 

1. All eight balance, all eight siving, 
A left allemande and a right and 

left grand. 
And promenade, oh, promenade! 

2. a) First and third couples for 

ward and back, 

b) Forward again and right and 

left through, 

The ladies cross left and the 
gents cross right 

c) And between side couples remain. 

d) Forward eight and fall back eight, 
Pass right through, don't hesitate. 
Forward eight and fall back eight, 
Pass right back and don't be late. 

e) Same two couples forward and back, 
Forivard again and circle four. 

f ) Docey-doe with the gent you know 
The lady goes C and the gent goes doe. 





Forward eiffkt and full back eiffhL 



FORWARD AND BACK EIGHT 357 

3. Balance home and everybody swing, 
Now allemande left with your left hand, 
Right to your partner and right and left grand, 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for second, third, and fourth couples. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The first and third couples advance four steps toward 

each other and then fall back to place. 

b) They advance again and each person takes the oppo 
site by the right hand as the two couples pass 
through each other (they thus pass to the left of the 

. opposite). As soon as they have passed, each gentle 
man takes his lady by the left hand with his left and 
passes her across in front of him. She continues 
around the set to the left and behind the side man, 
while the gentlemen turn right and pass around and 
behind the side ladies. 

c) The side couples separate so they can come in and 
stand in line between them. The first gentleman and 
the third lady are between the second couple ; aftd the 
first lady and the third gentleman are between the 
fourth couple, arranged in a line of four, alternately 
men and ladies. 

d) The two lines of four advance toward each other and 
fall back to place. Then they advance and pass 
through to the opposite four's place (passing to the 
left) They advance ai$d fall back again and then pass 
baqi to their own places. 

e) The first and second couples (now temporarily sepa 
rated) advance toward each other and fall back. Then 
they advance and join hands in a circle four. This puts 
$acb lady on tfe$ r%ht side of her own partner. 

) They do a (jiQcey^e in the regular way (see page 
160). 



& See p4ge 1$2 for ^pteation or substitute any other end- 



358 



DOUBLE BOW KNOT 

Double Bow Knot 



/; 





n < u 



FORMATION 
THE CALL: 

1. All jump up and never come down, 

Grab your honey in your arms and swing her around, 
'Til the hollow of your foot makes a hole in the ground. 
And promenade, oh, promenade. 




Tie 'em up in a double bow knot. 



.DOUBLE BOW KNOT 359 

2. a) First and third ladies out to the right, 

Circle three and get it hot, 

b) And tie 'em all up in a double boiv knot. 

c) At the head and feet the side gals meet 
And circle three and keep 'em hot. 
Tie 'em all up in a double bow knot. 

d) Now divide to either side 

And circle three and keep 'em hot. 
Tie 'em all up in a double bow knot. 

e) Noiv the head and the feet 
With the side gals meet. 

And circle three and keep 'em hot, 
And tie 'em all up in a double boiv knot. 

f ) Side gals trot home and everybody swing. 

3. Now allemande left with your left hand f 

Right hand to partner and right and left grand. 
Promenade eight when you come straight. 

Repeat 2 and 3 for the second and fourth ladies. 

This dance is adapted from the old Danish dance, "The 
Crested Hen." 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 149 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The first lady and third lady each leaves her partner 

and advances to the side couple on her right. She 
joins hands with them and the three circle to the left 
with a strenuous skipping step. 

b) The two ladies of each three let go each other's hands 
and the gentlemen are left in the middle with a lady on 
either band. Each gentleman swings the right hand 
lady tinder M$ !$ft arm without letting go the left 
hamc! lady. As she passes under, Ihie follows in under 
his owi| left anon, and the left hand lady at the same 
f wift 1*11*1 in under her right arm (that is, 
u*$t a;4l*hjr*$f*): As they straighten out he 
tlte MtMbk*B$ 'IWty under bis right arm and 
'ttftcl tlte rigM-haiid My follow under in another 

the rigW-hand lady, under 



360 DOUBLE BOW KNOT 

his left arm and turns a dishrag with the left lady 
and a second time turns the left lady under his right 
arm and turns a dishrag with the right lady. The 
grip or hand hold is never changed with either lady 
during any of the turning. Please be careful always 
to send the right hand lady through first. Sometimes, 
with beginners, both ladies try to go under at the 
same time and a painful collision results. The whole 
action is so strenuous, with a fast skipping step, that 
it is easy to "knock the ladies out" if they bump heads. 

c) The first and third ladies each continue around the set 
to the right. At the same time the side ladies go to the 
left ; that is, the first and fourth ladies go to the third 
gentleman and the third and second ladies to the first 
gentleman. Each group joins hands and the three's 
circle to the left. They then do the double bow knot 
as in (b). 

d) Now the ladies divide and go to the side gentlemen, 
the first and third ladies continuing to the right and 
the second and fourth ladies to the left. This puts 
the first and second ladies with the fourth gentleman 
and the third and fourth ladies with the second gen 
tleman. The three's circle again and do the double bow 
knot as in (b). 

e) The head ladies continue to the right and the side 
ladies to the left so that the first and fourth ladies 
meet with the first gentleman and the second and 
third ladies with the third gentleman. Each three 
circles and does the double bow knot. 

f ) The first and third ladies each stay with their own 
partners while the second and fourth ladies continue 
left and thus go back to their partners. And every 
body swings. 

3. See page 152 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 

& B tt 

The head, or active, ladies circle always to the right and 
the side, or theoretically inactive, ladies to the left, the head 
ladies Beginning the dance and the side ladies ending it. The 
four gentlemen stay in position waiting for each pair of 
laides to come to thena* Ii^ the repetition the side ladies are 
active and go to the pgM, while the $nd ladies go to the left. 



DIVE AND RESCUE THE LADY 

Dive and Rescue the Lady 



361 





AND 

T-fle LADY 
THE CALL: 

1. Honors right and honors left, 

All join hands and circle to the left, 
Break and swing and promenade back. 

2. a) First and third gents lead out to the right, 
b) Dive right in and rescue the lady, 

Dive again and pull out the gent. 




rescue the 



362 DIVE AND RESCUE THE LADY 

c) At the head and feet with the side gents meet. 
Dive right in and rescue the lady, 

Dive again and pull out the gent. 

d) Now divide to either side, 

And dive right in and rescue the lady, 
Dive again and rescue the gent. 

e) At the head and feet ivith the side gents meet, 
And dive right in and rescue the lady, 

Dive again and rescue the gent. 
f ) Side gents trot home and everybody swing. 

3. Swing your opposite across the hall, 
Noiv the lady on your right, 
Noiv your opposite across the hall, 
Now your own and promenade all! 

Repeat 2 and 3 for the second and fourth gentlemen. 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 148 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The first and third gentlemen each swing their part 

ners and advance to the couple on their right. The 
three's take hands and swing them high together in 
the center of each three. 

b) They still hold hands and swing their, arms back so 
as to separate as far as possible. The first and third 
gentlemen each pass under the arms of the couple 
they are with. In each set of three the gentlemen now 
turn outward under their own joined hands in a dish- 
rag and then pull the lady backward under their 
joined hands, so that all three are in a circle facing 
each other again. They swing their fi&nd^ up and 
high together then back and apart an^t the first and 
third gentlemen again dive radff .&e avxos of the 
couple they are ^ith, They mow ^ro %^;|o b&cjs: 
the laciy and with her turn a ^fi'ii^fe' their 




: TJie ait! 
atid l 1tie : &^ 
first anf ' ffee 



DIVE AND RESCUE THE LADY 363 

lady and the third and second gentlemen with the 
first lady. They swing arms up and together, separate, 
and the first and third gentlemen dive again as in (b) . 

d) The head gentlemen continue to the right and the 
side gentlemen to the left so the first and second 
gentlemen join with the fourth lady and third and 
fourth gentlemen join with the second lady. They 
repeat (b) the first and third gentlemen still doing 
the "diving." 

e) The heads continue right and the sides left so the first 
and fourth gentlemen join the first lady and the third 
and second gentlemen join the third lady. Then re 
peat (b) the first and third gentlemen doing the 
"diving." 

f ) The second and fourth gentlemen go back to their part 
ners and everybody swings. 

3. See page 155 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



The first and third gentlemen always progress to the 
right and the second and fourth to the left. And the first 
and third gentlemen, being active, always do the "diving and 
rescuing/' In the repetition of the dance the second and 
fourth go right and do the diving, the first and third circle 
to the left. 



364 FOUE GENTS CROSS RIGHT HANDS 

Four Gents Cross Right Hands 



THE CALL: 
1. 



0... 




All eight balance, 

All eight swing, 

A left allemande 

And a right hand grand, 

And promenade, oh, promenade. 

2. a) Four gents cross right hands, 

Circle to your partners. 

b) Turn 'em with your left hands 
One time around. 

c) Double on the right whirl; 

d) Back to your partners. 

e) All run away 

With the corner girl. 

Repeat 2 three more times until each man gets his 
own partner again. 

3, Now you're home and swing 'em all night. 
Allemande left, go left and right. 

Hand over hand around the ring; 
Hand over hand with a dear little thing. 
Promenade, oh, promenade! 




Four gents 



right hands. 



FOUR GENTS CROSS RIGHT HANDS 365 

THE EXPLANATION: 

1. See page 151 for explanation or substitute any introduc 
tion given there. 

2. a) The four gentlemen advance to the center and join 

right hands in a star. They circle to the left until 
they face their partners when they let go each other 
and return to them. 

b) Each gentleman joins left hands with his partner and 
circles once around with her. 

c) He returns to the center and again joins right hands 
with the other gentlemen and circles around to his 
partner. 

d) He joins left hands with partner and circles once more 
around with her, and continues on beyond her 

e) To the corner girl, with whom he takes the promenade 
hold and promenades with her back to his place. 

3. See page 154 for explanation or substitute any other end 
ing given there. 



r 



V. 



Glossary 



Allemande left the gentleman takes the left hand of the lady on his 
left with his left hand and walks once around her as she walks 
around him. Each returns to place. Usually followed by grand 
right and left. 

Allemande left just one the same but not followed by the usual grand 
right and left. Each goes back to his own place, ready for next call. 

Allemande right very uncommon, and usually follows an allemande 
left. Each dancer turns partner around by the right hand, and 
back to place. 

Arch a couple joins inside or near hands and raises them high for 
another couple to pass under. 

Balance can be done with anyone according to direction but usually 
with partner, in which case each steps back from the other four 
steps, drops into a slight curtsy, and then steps forward four steps 
together again. Sometimes it is done with only two steps back and 
forward. 

Balance home as usually danced, it apparently means for a couple 
to return to their home position, but to be correct they should 
balance to each other when they get home, and at the same time 
the three other couples should balance. 

Balance-swing after balancing to each other, the couple takes regular 
dance position,, the lady's right hand in gentleman's extended left 
hand, her left hand on his right shoulder, and his right arm around 
her waist. They should stand a little off center, or sideways, right 
hip touching right hip, and swing rapidly around in place with walk 
ing step 3 so Quick and vigorous as to be aware of considerable cen 
trifugal f o?ce or swing. The rotation is rifht-face or clockwise. 
Most balances are conduct with this swing. 

in G& ,04#$r7<a girt tp be alone in a cprcfe $r ring o darners who 
' e*tc& others' fewMte* l^tey usually circle clockwise, while she 



&wa|r fSrora each other, usually 



let f 



or ItoUs. 






368 GLOSSARY 

Change a) complete call for one square dance, 
b) to exchange partners. 

Circle four two couples face each other, join hands and circle to the 
left, or clockwise. 

Circle eight four couples face center of square, join hands, and circle 
to the left, or clockwise. 

Circle left a group holding hands circles clockwise. 

Circle right the same except to circle counterclockwise. 

Close to bring one foot to the side of the other. 

Come straight when you come to, or meet your partner, in a grand 
right and left. 

Corner in any square the dancer next to you who is not your partner 
(see next definition). 

Corner lady (or girl) the lady standing to the gentleman's left in the 
square. 

Corner man the gentleman standing to the lady's right in a square. 

Cut away usually used with a number such as six, four, or two. To 
cut away six is to pass through opposite couple, separate from 
your partner, and each circle around their half of the remaining 
six, lady to right and gentleman to left. To cut away four sepa 
rate from your lady and each pass around the couple on either side 
or four in all. To cut away two separate, and each pass around 
corner, which is one on each side or two. 

Dance position regular ballroom position lady and gentleman stand 
face to face, with the lady's right hand in the gentleman's extended 
left hand and her left hand on his right shoulder or upper arm. 
His right arm encircles her, and his right hand should be held 
about at her left shoulder blade though it is usually and incorrectly 
lower or farther around. 

Dip the first or introductory step on the first bar of the waltz. The 
gentleman rocks back on his left foot with his other foot lifted in 
the air in front while the lady rocks forward on her right foot and 
holds her other foot free of the floor behind her. The count is step 
one, rise on toes, two, fall to heel, three (all done on one foot) . On 
the next bar go directly into regular waltz starting with the foot 
which has been held in the air during first bar. 

Divide the ring a couple crosses square to opposite couple and passes 
between them. 

Docey-doe executed while two couples (with each lady on the right 
of her gentleman) hold hands in a circle of four. Each gentleman 
passes his lady's left hand from hi$ right hand to- his left, and 
she passes between the opposite couple in making this change. He 
now passes ter befeind Mm around his left side, lets go her liantf, 
and glill f aeiug' the ofypo^ite gentleman reaches with his right hand 
far the opposite Ia4y wha is now coming arot|nt4 f r/om belimd the 
opposite geutleiEiaii. He tura$ her awand betond! hto on Ms right 
sMe at^fce-a^s ^it$t. hi& left towf for fefe .oyw-p, pa^ti^jr who Jw 
gone arotmfl ffe , 'offifce ^geatle^p a$*4 ia ^o* fowmg ftrom 
ind him> B&.ppt^ ' 

to posiffc^ ->(%e j 



GLOSSARY 369 

Docey corners to dos-a~dos or pass back to back with the corner or 

left hand lady. 
Dos-a-dos to pass back to back with a person. Advance to this per 

son and pass to the left (that is, pass right shoulder to right 

shoulder) , step to the right so you are both back to back, and with 

out changing the direction in which you face, encircle him and back 

up to your own position. See page 106. 

Do-si-do the same as docey-doe and it is the more usual spelling. 
Double elbow a more complicated right and left grand, hooking el 

bows and turning instead of merely taking hands and passing. As 

the gentleman meets each lady he hooks right elbows with her and 

turns for four counts, then reverses and hooks left elbows with her 

and turns for four counts. He then advances to the next lady and 

does the same with her, and so on around the set. See page 157. 
Eight hands round eight persons join hands in a circle. 
Ends first and third couples in a set. 
Feet the foot couple or third couple. If the second couple is active 

the fourth couple becomes foot couple. 
Figure eight to pass between two persons (or two couples) encircle 

one of them, pass through again and encircle the other, in a path 

which resembles the figure eight. 

First couple the couple standing nearest the head of the hall. 
Five hands round five persons join hands in a circle. 
Foot or foot couple the third couple, or the couple opposite the active 

couple. 
Forward awd back advance four counts and return backwards four 

counts to place. 
Forward two, three, four t six, etc. as many persons as designated 

advance four counts. 
Four and a half or 
Four hands half two couples join hands in a circle of four and turn 

to the left until they have exchanged places, that is, a circle of four 

makes a half turn. 
FOUT hand mill four persons join right hands shoulder high and pivot 

clockwise around their joined hands, or join left hands if so 

directed and circle in the opposite direction. 

hands full around two couples' join hands in a ring and circle 

to the left onoe around $o each couple is in same position from 

which they stared circling. 

h&nd$ faxlf-r&& fmr o$ & ka4/ above* 

hwn&s r<nw$^4wo mti^lea Wfce hands in a ring and circle to the 

let^unta next <feeetioto is giv^t, u^tiaiy 'followed by a dooeyrdoe. 

Four *kw%d ^f-r-the sapi$ as 

iteft ol fee $ rst couple and opposite 




round wifctx joined 
a ^circle of four, or includes 
of s% etc. ^ 



370 GLOSSARY 

Gent goes wrong the gentleman turns to the left when his lady is 
directed to turn to the right. 

Grand right and left each couple in a square join right hands and 
pass each other, so that the ladies advance clockwise and the gen 
tlemen advance counterclockwise. Each gentleman touches left 
hands with the next lady and passes on beyond her while she con 
tinues in the opposite direction; he then touches right hands with 
the next lady and they pass each other. Then he touches left hands 
with the next and passes her. This brings him to his own lady, 
with whom he joins right hands, and turns to the promenade posi 
tion at his side. See page 51. 

Grand circle each gentleman takes his lady to the edge of the hall, 
and puts her on his right hand and faces center. All couples join 
hands in one large circle, and all facing center. 

Hand over hand same as right and left grand. 

Hands round used with any number such as six hands round, means 
for six people to join hands in a ring and circle clockwise. 

Head the first or head couple. 

Head of the hall the end of the hall which is designated by the caller 
as the head, usually the end nearest the piano. 

Home the original position of each couple in a square, and to which 
they return after any maneuver. 

Honors all All gentlemen bow to their partners. 

Honors left each gentleman bows to the lady on his left. 

Honors right each gentleman bows to the lady on his right who is, 
of course, his partner. 

Inside ring the path a couple follows when they promenade around 
the set inside the other three couples. 

Join hands or join paddies usually when all four couples of a set 
join hands in a ring although smaller rings are sometimes formed. 

Ladies' chain two couples face each other. The two ladies advance, 
join right hands, and pass each other. Each lady gives her left hand 
to the opposite gentleman and he pivots with her, turning her com 
pletely around. Each lady advances and again joins right hands 
with the other lady and passes her. She then gives her left hand 
to her partner's left, and he pivots and turns her around to place. 
See page 132. 

Ladies' doe often only the preliminary phrase of a docey-doe and 
ignored by the dancers, but more correctly it should precede a 
doeey-doe, by the two ladies encircling each other with a dos-a-do$, 
followed by the two gentlemen doing the same, usually to the call 
gmt$ y,fm know. Then the docey-doe is done. 

Lewd Mifcr-HaetvaBoe to wherever directed. 

Left faeer^to fttwt and lacB to ytmr own left 

Odd co^f^- % wly Itoe^iw couple in a get, ag* wto t&e first cwij>ie 
is doing; a cliapge with th second and fourth c^iplte at %e same 
time, the fkW QOttpitoffe feft as ai* <$<!<J or ia?**!*} iffe. 

One and % h^^'^r^ ^t^^^4^m'^^^^^ <QFB, ach 
gentleman htx>Mn^ xfejfa ^Ife^wi^ Ms Btttr.*md: 4Mb* oee 



GLOSSARY 371 

full turn around her and back to his place, continuing a half turn, 
releasing and going on to the next lady. He hooks left elbows with 
her, turns once and a half around and on to the next, alternately 
hooking right or left elbow with each lady he meets. See page 158. 

One hand turn taking a lady by one hand (her right in your right or 
vice- versa) and turning her around. 

Opposite when two couples face each other the opposite for each 
gentleman is the other gentleman's partner, the opposite for each 
lady the other lady's partner. 

Opposite couple the couple directly across the set from you, 

Outside rw# the path taken by a single couple when they promenade 
around the outside of the other three couples in the set. 

Pokey cowboy pronunciation of polka. 

Promenadeto march in couples with the lady on the gentleman's 
right and their arms crossed and hands clasped in front of them, the 
lady's right hand in the gentleman's right and her left hand in his 
left hand. His right arm should be crossed over or in front of her 
left arm. 

Promenade eight the four couples of a square promenade counter 
clockwise around the set and back to their own positions. 

Right face to pivot and face to your right. 

Right and left two couples pass through each other (ladies to the 
inside) each gentleman taking right hands with the opposite lady 
as he passes her, and taking his partner's left hand in his left as 
soon as they have passed through. Usually he makes a left pivot, 
turning her around with him until the two couples face each other. 
They now pass back in the same manner, pivot to the left, and face 
each other in their original positions. Sometimes done without 
touching hands in passing. And sometimes done without pivoting, 
but passing directly on to the next oncoming couple. See page 128. 

Salute to make a deep bow to your partner or to the lady directed. 

Salute your company all four gentlemen in a set simultaneously bow 
to their own partners. 

Sashay to slide to the side with a step close step close step! 
Second couple the couple to the right of the first couple in a set. 
Set four couples facing each other in a square formation. See page 

5$. 
Seven hands r<wm seven persons join hands in a ring, all facing to 

the center, and circle to the left 
Sid&$ the second and fourth 
Side couples th& same as $ide$. 



fmnd$ rww- ^foc jmrsws joifc teids in a ring, facing center, and 
circle to the left. 



th$ nw~^a dtipk a^lvawes aeross a set ? passes between the 
p09fte c^fle^ gta Wy m^mally turns to her right and the gentle- 
WTO to M& feft, Tlae^r g$' arocri^J the outside of the set, and meet 

4*fc 



372 GLOSSARY 

Step close to step with one foot and close the other foot to the side 
of it. 

Swing to take a slightly modified dance position and circle round 
each other in place, that is, stand face to face with your partner, the 
gentleman extends his left arm and supports the lady's right hand 
in his left hand. She places her left hand on his right shoulder or 
upper arm, and his right arm partly encircles her waist. They 
usually stand a little off center so their right hips almost touch 
each other. Then with a light walking step they circle around each 
other in place, going in a clockwise direction, and usually making 
two complete circles around each other. 

They may also swing around each other holding single hands, 
both hands, or hooking elbows when so directed. 

Three hands round three persons join hands in a ring facing inward, 
and circle to the left. 

Third couple the couple opposite the first couple. 

Tip usually when the sets are called out on the floor for a square 
dance, two complete changes or dances are called, with a slight 
pause between them. They are called the first tip and the second tip. 

Trot 'em home promenade back to original positions. 

Turn right back in the grand right and left when the gentlemen meet 
their own partners each takes his partner by the right hand and 
completely encircles her so that he is facing the opposite direction. 
The grand right and left is now repeated in the opposite direction, 
the gentlemen now circling clockwise while the ladies circle 
counterclockwise. 



if Cowboy Dance 



\ Tunes 



arranged by 
FREDERICK KNORR 



Table 

of 
Contents 



6/8 RHYTHM 

Page 

Honest John 378 

Irish Washerwoman ....378 

Chichester 379 

Captain Jinks ., 379 

Ocean Waves 380 

2/4 AND 4/4 RHYTHM 

I Wonder 380 

Johnny's Down the 

River 381 

Romping Molly 381 

Buffalo Gals .....382 

The Girl I Left 

Behind Me 382 

Golden Slippers 38S 

Soldier's Joy .._ 383 

Nellie Ely ,.384 

Kingdom Come 384 

Whoa Ho Dobbin 
Four and Tvratity 
Cowboy and 



FIDDLE TUNES 

Page 

Hen and Chickens 386 

Waggoner 387 

Durang 387 

Hull's Victory 388 

Pigtown Hoe Down 388 

Lamp Lighter 389 

Turkey in the Straw 389 

Arkansas Traveler 390 

Devil's Dream 390 

Four White Horses 391 

White Cockade 391 

SPECIAL DANCES 

Cheyenne Varsou- 

vianna _, 392 

Schottisehe ...*...,- ,.,.393 

Pop Goe$ the WeaseL._393 

So-So Polka 

Rye 



Foreword 



T71REDERICK KNORR is a cellist in the Denver Symphony 
J? and a thorough musician. Because of an instinctive love 
of the virile homely strength of the old dance music, he has 
taken a genuine interest in our cowboy dancing. Whenever 
he can get away, he "sets in" with my dance orchestra and 
strums with it on his guitar or banjo. He is so fascinated 
with these old dances that for several summers he has 
played with us for our engagements at Central City, and 
last fall took the trip with our dance troupe to California 
as strummer in our little orchestra. 

When I asked him to record some of the tunes for me 
and to make a simple arrangement for those who wanted 
music to accompany my book Coivboy Dances, he was de 
lighted. He sorted over hundreds of tunes and finally made 
the following selection as most typical and most interesting. 

He has scored them as very simple piano arrangements 
expecting the "fiddler" to play the "top line" or melody. 
Each pianist uses his own interpretation and is expected to 
fill out, elaborate, and vary these arrangements however he 
pleases. And the real "fiddler," of course, takes all the liber 
ties and adds all the flourishes that his ear may dictate. To 
help the "strummer," Mr. Knorr has indicated the chord to 
be played by a letter designation. From this simple frame 
work, your dFchesfet is expected to work out its own best 
arrangement. 

You will irfice that mmi of the pieces are in simple 
keys wh*S $wrp&. Most pianists may prefer flats, but "fid- 
dtort" and '^frumwers^ Want the sharps, and so you will 
find mart of <&** oWHtfeflte itaisie sharpened to their taste, 

Hit toy; in a hundred piece*. 
' ; t*i4 certain keys that are e^sy for their 



FOREWORD 

voices to chord to. A good caller often asks his orchestra to 
shift a key up or down a little so that his chording chant will 
fit more easily into his natural voice range. Rather instinc 
tively, a caller pitches his voice on an element of the major 
chord of the key being played, usually the dominant. Some 
times he chants on the third, occasionally on the tonic itself. 
He may vary back and forth from one element of the chord 
to another. But usually he prefers a key that lets him chant 
his call on the dominant without straining his voice. 

Mr. Knorr has arranged his tunes in four groups and 
suggested that I say a word about each group. In the first 
group he has tunes in 6/8 rhythm. Many old fiddlers prefer 
the 6/8 rhythm, but they have to be watched or they will 
get into such a slow rocking-horse monotony that the dance 
becomes no fun. In a smooth 6/8 such as "Ocean Wave," 
the dancers, who step only on the first and fourth beat of 
each measure, slow the dance down, and if the dancers are 
young they instinctively have to put in little wiggles or 
jiggles to keep themselves amused between the slow steps, 
and that is not so good. However, if the 6/8 melody is faster 
and sort of spills over itself like running water as in the 
"Irish Washerwoman" the dancers achieve a quick step 
and a snappy dance. "Honest John" is a fine tune to dance to. 
It is speedy enough to establish the quick step, and smooth 
enough to carry the dancers quite away with it. "Chichester" 
is a good original tune made up by one of my favorite fid 
dlers, Ben Chichester. 

Six-eight rhythm is sometimes not quite so easy to "call 
to." A good caller instinctively times his call to counts of 
four. Regardless of delays caused by backward sets (which 
never let him call twice alike with any music) he always 
starts a phrase on a strong beat and builds his phrases on 
patterns of four. This somehow is often easier to do with 
the speedier 2/4 or 4/4 time* 

The BecoiKl group of tunes given here are in 2/4 or 4/4 
rhythm. Nances are always a question. Take the first one, 
our regular fiddler "Nick" Nichols often plays it, but he 
doesn't faiow where he pieced it up. So when ^e a$k him 
the nauae ip says, '$ Wonder/* The last fw turns in this 
group are Mr, Itnorr^ owipu We have playo} tfawoi and liked 
them and jMfted 1$ > induce them ' 

The 
Made by 



FOREWORD 377 

melody isn't difficult for any good fiddler. But when a pian 
ist tries to play that same racing melody in good quick tempo, 
it is not many repetitions until the muscles in the forearm 
begin to knot and the pianist can hardly go on. These melo 
dies are very difficult and tiring for a pianist. Some of them 
are simple enough but do not "lay under the hand" right. 
So usually the pianist just chords and "plays around" with 
them, while the fiddler carries the melody at a furious and 
untiring pace. Amateur pianists had better leave them alone. 

And your old-time fiddler will probably say that isn't 
the way he plays it. Surprising how these standard tunes, 
transmitted from ear to ear, are each played as individual 
and personal arrangements. Sometimes, a tune varies so 
much under the fingers of different fiddlers that you can 
hardly recognize it as being the same tune. And always, 
somehow, any good fiddler's tune has a personal magic in it, 
that can't be put down on paper in eighth and sixteenth 
notes. 

The last selection is a group of special tunes mostly for the 
round dances described in my book. I have suggested there 
a single album of old-time dance music, and for each round 
dance have described just how much of each tune we usu 
ally hear in the West, and just how it is played. And so in 
stead of repeating these tunes here, Mr. Knorr has given us 
some variations. He has given us his own arrangement of 
the Varsouvianna, built from the many Varsouvianna tunes 
he has heard, and putting in as many phrases of his own as 
he liked and writing a new waltz for it. It is a good tune 
to dance to. The Schottische is his arrangement taken from 
an old clog over a hundred years old The simple little 
polka is his own and is typical of this style of dance. There 
are a hundred other polka tunes extant for you to choose 
from. He Jias arranged the Rye Waltz as it is played here 
in the Wt&t and as I have described it And because so many 
orch^tr disagree on <^orcling "Bop Goes the Weasel," he 
has given an arrangement of ttiis. 

The ol4-tita$ $a?ie tpw are infinite in number- We 
hope feit^ trill serve your pur 

pose and $4ct fe yotp jo# IB powfeoy aancing. 

LJJOYB SHAW 



378 






Honest John 

G 




I 




Irish Washerwoman 







itftag 



Chichester 

D*L 



879 




Captain Jinks 




380 



Ocean Waves 

A7 







I Wonder 



i 



.A7 



D 



D D 



m 



^FhP 



rfrii-rrr|r T ffi] 



ii 

W|^i >l',^ J- 






Johnnys Down the River 381 



t 



A? , D , jtf D 



G 







D D 



I 



i 



uri 






Romping Molly 







i 



P 



f 



.. 









382 



Buffalo Gals 




The Girl I Left Behind Me 




Golden Slippers 



383 



D 




Soldier's Joy 




384 



Nellie Bly 




Kingdom Come 




Whoa Ho Dobbin 



385 




Pom* and Twenty 



* + ' 






m 






C C 



i 



c 



t' 



i 







386 Cowboy and Indians 



C D?" G D 




A Hen and Chickens 

pizz pizz 
f k arco ar 

i 



pizz pizz 
'-arco-haico 












Waggoner 



387 




ill 



Pif 



G 




Durang 




A? 




ft* 



ft* 



D 



&g 



388 



Hull's Victory 




A? D D 







A -,,r>i/h.l, A 




) D ^ G 

tJ ir,rrfrrripJ3 



R 




Ehii. 



i 




A7 D 



i 



Pig-town Hoe Down 




Lamp Lighter 



389 



G 



i 



ill 



*fe 



B7 G 



_G E7 Aim 



s 



G E? Ami D7 G 



G 




Turkey in the Straw 




390 Arkansas Traveler 



C G P A^ Q 



a j j jjj j 







Devil's Dream 





fe 



a o 



5-prj-B 



. i p< 



Idl 



8 J 



Four White Horses 



391 




E? ^ A 

-u Tii*. 



Bmt K?L A 




* 



M 



M 



-^- 



AJ. 



CJI TJ 



&JH+e 




White Cockade 




M 












i 




Cheyenne Varsouvianna 

A? 



i 






PP 







112 





-9 

D 



Hjfflj 



i 



lift | 

W* J 



i . 

J r 









Ml 



Schottische 

0_. A? 




. 



n f f J f 







* 




Pop Goes the Weasel 




So-So Polka 




Rye Waltz 



G 



G G 







f 









r 



G 



Gl G7 



r 



t&3j& 








Phonograph 
Records 



A N ORCHESTRA or at least a piano is necessary for really 
-** satisfactory dancing. But some groups find it impossible 
to get competent musicians and they find that they have to 
use phonograph records in order to dance at all. Records are 
never satisfactory for a big first-class dance, but they can 
be used for small groups and for practice sessions. 

A few years ago practically the only albums available 
were of Eastern Singing Quadrilles. Fine as they were, they 
didn't help too much with this type of book, which deals 
mostly with Western "patter" dances. But we have been 
fortunate in the last few years in that many new albums 
of Western dancing have appeared on the market. In fact, 
they are coming out so rapidly that it is almost impossible 
to keep any list up to date. 

Some dancers prefer the twelve-inch records because 
they play longer and do not have to be turned over so often 
in the dance. Others prefer the te^i^ch records because 
they say they are easier to transport tod are a little less 
liable to break. You mnst naake yotyr choice. A chief de 
termining factor in your choice will be the sp^ed of the 
record. We have arranged the albums in the following list 
more or less according to speed, from the faster to, the 
slower. ,-, 

The speed of each al^tim is indicated by metronome 
ngs, M.MT to . For all practical ^purposes this can 
for yot| "tfeps- per minute." 

t&nd to be slow from 106 to 124 steps 



396 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Texas albums (because they use a special dipping two- 
step) tend to range from 126 to 130. 

Cowboy dances of the North, with their quick shuffling 
glide, tend to be faster, from 134 to 144. (I personally feel 
that about 136 is nearly right.) 

Exhibition dancing often speeds up to 146 to 156. 

Kentucky Running Sets may be very fast, from 160 to 
180. 

Pick your own speed. You will find it not only depends 
upon your style but that it will also tend to determine your 
style. 

Caution. Make sure that the turntable of your record 
player turns at 78 revolutions per minute. That is the 
speed at which the records were made and at which they 
were supposed to be played. Don't blame the records or the 
musicians if your turntable is too fast. 

SQUARE DANCE ALBUMS WITH CALLS 
WESTERN STYLE 

Lloyd Shaw calling Cowboy Dances, 

Decca Album A 524 M.M. 134-140 

Music by Duel in the Sun Square Dance Orchestra 
Decca Recording Co., New York 4 twelve-inch records 

Note. This album was especially made by the author to accompany 
this book. Its scheme is to give as many different calls as possible 
(two on the first face, six on the second, and ten on the third), to 
gether with a variety of "trimmings" presented in the form of "hash." 
The beginner is supposed to study each call separately (page refer 
ences to this book are given below) and then to practice with the 
five practice sides, which are given without calls. After mastering 
each call separately, repeating it over and over to himself, he can 
then try testing himself by dancing the whole combination as given 
on the first two records. 

1A. Star to the Right, page 167 

Right Hand Back, pajre 160 

IB. Split Ring Hash, containing 

Split t^e Rijj^ awl Alemamde, page/ %$$ 
pvide the^ Rin# and Swing Corners, pa^e 
givide ike Rin$ and Corners Bow, 



( See ttfe 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 397 

2A. Docey-doe Hoedown, containing 

Lady Round the Lady and the Gent Solo, page 170 

Two Gents Swing: with the Elbow Swing, page 172 

I'll Swing Your Girl; You Swing Mine, page 176 

Swing at the Wall, page 178 

Him and Her, page 182 

The Girl I Left Behind Me, page 184 

The Lady Round Two, page 195 

Dive for the Oyster, page 197 

Little Brown Jug, page 199 

Four Gents Cross Right Hands, page 364 

PRACTICE SIDES WITHOUT CALLS 
2B. Pigtown Hoedown ; Lamplighter 
* 3. Nellie Bly; Four and Twenty 

White Cockade; Four White Horses 
4. Honest John; Chichester 

I Wonder; Romping Mollie 

Roy Rogers calling Co^vboy Square Dances, 

Decca Album 226 M.M. 160 

Music by Cooley's Buckle Busters 
Decca Records, Inc., New York 3 ten-Inch records 

Note. Very good, but very fast and slightly irregular in form, 
sometimes using five couples in a square. 

1. Round the Couple and Swing When You Meet 

Chase that Rabbit Chase that Squirrel 

2. Bird in a Cage and Three Rail Pen 

Round That Coupl,e Go Through and Swing 

3. Boy Around a Boy Girl Around a Girl 

Lady Round the Lady and the Gent Solo 

Carl Myles calling Square Dances, 

Imperial Album FD 15 M.M. 140-144 

Music by The California Haylofters 
Imperial Record Co. 137 North Western Avenue 

Los Angeles, California 4 ten-inch records 

1. Lady Half Way Round 

The Rout 

2. Lady Rorad the Lady 



& Ifrd in 
Sally 

4* If i$&xmri Htecbwn 

Split tfoe King and Elbow Swing 



398 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Bud Udick calling Bar Nothin' Squares, 

Special Album M.M. 136-144 

Music by Cactus Tart's Orchestra 
Pikes Peak Records, 465 First National Bank Building 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 5 ten-inch records 

1. Take a Little Peek; I'll Swing Your Girl You Swing Mine; 

Elbow Swing ; Dive for the Oyster 

Inside Arch Outside Under; Three Ladies Chain; Swing the 
Right Hand Gent with the Right Hand Round 

2. Promenade the Inside Ring; Four Ladies Chain 

Two Ladies Chain Through the Line; Split the Ring Com 
bination 

3. Shoot That Pretty Girl; Swing That Girl Behind You; Swing 

at the Wall; Half Sashay Your Partner Round 
Swing at the Head and the Foot ; Promenade the Inside Ring 

4. My Pretty Girl (Singing call) 

Swing the Opposite Girl with the Right Hand Round; Meet 
in the Center and Swing Right There 

5. La Varsouvianna (Round Dance) 

Cotton Eyed Joe; Good Night Waltz (Round Dances) 
Note. The album above was recorded at one of the regular weekly 
dances at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs. The audience 
noises can be heard behind the calls. 

Jonesy calling Square Dances , 

Black and White Album 65 M.M. 130-146 

Music by Cactus Andy and his Texas Dandies 
Black and White Records, 

Hollywood, California 3 ten-inch records 

1. Sally Goodin 

Cage the Bird 

2. Oh Susanna, Part I (Singing call) 

Texas Star, Part II 

3. Oh Susanna, Part II 

Texas Star, Part I 

4. Smash the Window (without call) 

Tennessee Waggoner (without call) 

Bill Mooney calling Crest Album of Squares 

Music by his Cactus Twisters 
(Write Bill Mooney, 530 JB. Alosta, 

Glendora, California) 2 twelve-inch records. 

1, Head Tw^ Gent& Cross Over 

$1*410 <ty tbe 'Gage 

2. AJta*azi4 l<$t an$ AQqviwMe Ttefr ' , 

Arwirf ISat Gowk and TaJm A T JfcfcU 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 399 

Jim Lackey calling Square Dances, 

Hamilton Album M.M. 120-136 

Music by Besse Ledf ord and the Merrie Strings 
Hamilton Records, 10754 Prospect Avenue, 

Chicago, Illinois 4 twelve-inch records 

1. Ladies to Center and Back to Bar 

Old Arkansas 

2. Forward Six, Fall Back Six 

Indian Style 

3. Dip and Dive 

Four Leaf Clover and You Swing Mine 

4. Head Two Gents Cross Over (Singing call) 

Spanish Cavaliero (Singing call) 

Carl Journell calling, Folkraft Album F 5 M.M. 126-130 

Music by Grady Hester and his Texans 
Folkraft Records, 7 Oliver Street 

N-ewark 2, New Jersey 4 ten-inch records 

1. Bird in the Cage 

Sashay Partners Halfway Round 

2. Sally Goodin 

The Wagon Wheel 

3. Texas Star 

Four in Line You Travel 

4. Around the Couple and Swing at the Wall 

Sashay By and Resashay 

Bob Hager calling, 

Linden Album (3246) M.M. 118-124 

Mu&ie by Hilda Smythe's Orchestra 
Linden Record Corporation, 2417 Second Avenue 

Seattle, Washington 5 ten-inch records 

1. Down the Center and Divide the Ring" 

Little Yaller Gal 

2. Gents Walk Around the Outside 

Right and Left with the Couple You Meet 



a. 

Separate Around the Outside Track (Singing sail) 



Hallway Rpund 

J|tsit 
ia Beet (Cotttra Dance) 



400 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Les Gotcher Calling, 

MacGregor Albums No. 1 and No. 2 M.M. 118-138 

MacGregor Records, 729 South Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, California 

Album No. 1 4 twelve-inch records 

1. Texas Star 

I'll Swing Your Girl You Swing Mine 

2. Take a Peek 

Right Hand Over, Left Hand Under 

3. Inside Arch, Outside Under 

Lady Round the Lady 

4. Swing Or Adam, Swing OP Eve 

Hot Time in the OF Town (Singing call) 

Album No. 2 4 ten-inch records 

1. Cage the Bird 

Heel and Toe Polka (Round Dance) 

2. Sally Gooden 

Schottische (Round Dance) 

3. Rye Waltz (Round Dance) 

Dive for the Oyster 

4. Varsovienna (Round Dance) 

Swing in the Center, Swing on the Sides 

ALBUMS WITHOUT CALLS 

The albums with calls are usually used in the homes and 
with small groups who do not have a caller But far more 
groups, and larger groups who do have a caller but who are 
not able to secure "live music" for their dances, must have 
recourse to recorded music. Fortunately, many albums of 
square dance music have appeared recently. Speed will be 
one of the factors determining your choice, and this is given 
m M.M. markings for each volume, which practically means 
"steps per minute." So pick your own speed. 

Signature Album BUI. 144-150 

Music by Riley Shepard, with Shorty Lotag- and his Santa 
Fe Rafegers 

Signature Becord Company g ten-incji records 

1. .Turkr w tie Straw 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 401 

2. Devil's Dream 

Shepard's Schottische (Round Dance) 

3. Ta-ra-ra Boom De-ay 

Boil Them Cabbage Down 

Lloyd Shaw calling Cowboy Dances, 

Decca Album A 524 M.M. 134-140 

Music by Duel in the Sun Square Dance Orchestra 
Decca Recording Co., New York 5 faces of twelve-inch 

records (without calls) ; 
also 3 faces with calls 
2B. Pigtown Hoedown; Lamplighter 

3. Nellie Bly ; Four and Twenty 

White Cockade ; Four White Horses 

4. Honest John ; Chichester 

I Wonder; Romping Mollie 

Harley Luse Square Dances, 

Imperial Album FD 8 . M.M. 130-138 

Music by Harley Luse and his Blue Ridge Mountain Boys 
Imperial Record Co., 137 North Western Avenue 

Los Angeles, California 4 ten-inch records 

1. Turkey in the Straw 

Varsouvianna (Round Dance) 

2. Tennessee Square 

Chicken Reel 

3. Soldier's Joy 

Buffalo Gals 

4. Mississippi Sawyer 

Arkansas Traveler 

Bill Mooneyes Imperial Album FD 24 M.M. 120-140 

Music by Bill Mooney and his Cactus Twisters 

Imperial Record Co., 137 North Western Avenue 

Los Angeles, California 4 ten-inch records 

1. Red River Valley 

Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight 

2. My Pretty Girl 

The Old Fine Tree 

3. Glory, Glory, Hallelujah 

Buttons and Bows (M.M. 106) 

4. O 



*y*' jShigjfclg Quadrilles which have been very popular 
in tfe$ W@s& *ft6ttr played at a Western tempo, 



402 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Southern Mountain Square Dance Music, 

Folkraft Album M.M. 124-136 

Music by Folkraft Mountain Boys 
Folkraft Records, 7 Oliver Street, 

Newark 2, New Jersey 4 ten-inch records 

1. Marching Through Georgia 

Devil's Dream 

2. Honolulu Baby 

Git Along Cindy (Round Dance) 

3. Oh Susannah 

Flop-eared Mule 

4. Buffalo Gals 

Old Joe Clark 

Texas Square Dances, Folkraft Album M.M. 126-134 

Music by Grady Hester and his Orchestra 
Folkraft Record Co., 7 Oliver Street 

Newark 2, New Jersey 4 ten-inch records 

1. Give the Fiddler a Dram 

Eighth of January 

2. Hop Light, Ladies 

Waggoner's Reel 

3. Irish Washerwoman 

Ida Red 

4. Bill Cheatham 

Arkansas Traveler 

Paul Hunt's Square Dance, Disc Album 631 M.M. 126-134 
Music by Paul Hunt and his Rock Candy Mountaineers 

Disc Record Co., 117 West Forty-sixth Street 
New York 3 ten-inch records 

1. Rakes of Mallow 
Rig a Jig Jig 

2, Golden Slippers 

kittl Brown Jug 

3. Soldier's Joy 

Lamplighter's Hornpipe 

Country Fotir Square Dance, 

Folkraft Album jjjj. 122-1M 

Musie by Folkraft Cotwtry 
r, leader 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 403 

Folkraft Record Co., 7 Oliver Street 

Newark 2, New Jersey 4 ten-inch records 

1. Ten Little Indians 

Life On the Ocean Wave 

2. White Cockade and Village Hornpipe 

Little Old Log Cabin in the Lane 

3. Angleworm Wiggle 

Wabash Cannonball 

4. My Darling Nellie Gray 

Pop Goes the Weasel 

Texas Square Dances, 

Imperial Albums 16 to 20 M.M. 118-130 

Music by Jimmy Clossin's Blue Bonnet Playboys 
Imperial Record Co., 137 North Western Avenue 

Los Angeles, California Five albums, each with 

2 twelve-inch records 
Album FD 16 

1, The Girl I Left Behind Me 

Oxford Minuet (Round Dance) 

2. Eighth of January 

Little Brown Jug 

Album FD 17 

1. Buffalo Gals 

Varsouvienne (Round Dance) 

2. Ragtime Annie 

Tucker's Waltz (Mixer) 

Album FD 18 

1. Arkansas Traveler 

Texas Cowboy Schottische (Round Dance) 

2. Soldier's Joy 

Hona Sweet Home (Round Dance) 

Album FD 19 

1, Leather Breeches 

Virginia Reel (Contra Dance) 

2. Golden Slippers 

Waltz Quadrille (with Singing call) 

Album FD 20 

1. Waggoney 

OottoiblJyed Joe (Round Dance) 
& CMefer* K^l 

Ovtr the Wayes (Round Dance) 



404 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Cliffie Stone's Square Dances, 

Capitol Album BD 44 M.M. 118-128 

Music by Cliffie Stone and his Square Dance Band 
Capitol Records, Hollywood, California 4 ten-inch records 

1. Special Instruction 

Soldier's Joy 

2. Sally Goodin 

Cripple Creek 

3. The Gal I Left Behind Me 

Bake Them Hoecakes Brown 

4. Ragtime Annie 

Golden Slippers. 

Texas Square Dances, Henlee Album M.M. 126 

Music by Henry Hudson and his Band 
Henlee Record Co., 2402 Harris Boulevard 

Austin, Texas 2 twelve-inch records 

1. Soldier's Joy 

Chicken 'n Dumplin's 

2. Durang's Hornpipe 

Uncle Joe; Turkey in the Straw. 

Homesteader Series, Folkraft Album M.M. 120-126 

Music by Foster's Old Time Fiddlers 
Folkraft Records, 7 Oliver Street 

Newark 2, New Jersey 4 twelve-inch records 

1. Down in the Tall Grass 

Mississippi Sawyer 

2. Lost Indian 

Billy in the Lowlands 

3. Steamboat Bill 

Chicken Reel 

4. Barn Dance 

Speed the Plow 

Harley Luse's Sqwre Dances , 

Imperial Album MJC 11W24 

Music by Harley Luse and his Blue Ridge Mountain Boys 
Imperial Record Co., 137 North Western Avenue 

s, California 4 t^Snd* records 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 405 

2. Hiawatha 

Silver Bell 

3. Darling Nellie Gray 

Spanish Cavalier 

4. She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain 

At a Georgia Camp Meeting 

SINGLE RECORDS 

Recreational Project of the Methodist Church 

M.M. 126-136 
Michael Herman's Folk Orchestra 

Recorded and Manufactured by RCA Victor 

(Write Michael Herman, Box 201, Flushing, Long Island, 

N.Y.) 
M 103 Irish Washerwoman 

Captain Jinks 
M 104 Red River Valley and Cicilian Circle 

Camptown Races and Pop Goes the Weasel 

ALBUMS OF SINGING CALLS 

Several years ago the only square dance albums avail 
able were made in the East and were mostly of singing calls. 
More set in their pattern, slower, and usually simpler, they 
did not illustrate at all well the dances described in this 
book. 

They are altogether delightful in themselves, but since 
they are in a quite different technique from the Western 
p&tter call described in Cowboy Dunces, we are not recom 
mending these albums as being quite so suitable. 

In some of the records the calls are spoken instead of 
being sung. But they have the rhythm, the technique, and 
the tempo of the singing call, and they are not at all typical 
of Western patter calling. They are just as fine but in a 
different category. 

Caution. When you hear "do-si-do'* in a singing call, it 
does not mean the "docey doe" described in this book. It is 
not the Western (or Southern) figure performed by four 
dancers* It umiis only doe-a-dos or -'back to back/' where 



406 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

two people simply pass around each other back to back. 
And may I suggest that in your Western calling you always 
pronounce this back to back "dos-ah-doe" (as the old simon- 
pure dancing masters always did) in order to help the 
dancers distinguish between these two very different figures. 

Al Brundage calling Country Fair Square Dances, 
Folkraft Album F 1 M.M. 124-134 

Music by Folkraft Country Dance Orchestra, 

Pete Seeger, leader 
Folk Record Co., 7 Oliver Street 

Newark 2, New Jersey 3 ten-inch records 

(Or write to Al Brundage, P.O. Box 176, Stepney, Connecti 

cut) 

1. Indian File 

Two Head Gents Cross Over 

2. Keep a-Steppin' 

Little Old Log Cabin 

3. Forward Six and Back 

Danbury Fair Quadrille 

Tiny Clark calling Square Dances, 

Pilotone Album No. 131 , M.M. 120-134 

Music by Village Barn Gang 
Pilot Radio Corporation, Long Island City, 

New York 4 ten-inch records 

1. Darling Nellie Gray 

Devil's Dream (without call) 

2. The Girl I Left Behind Me 

Turkey in the Straw (Virginia Reel) 

3. Little Brown Jug 

Hinky Dinky Paries Vous 

4. Ain't Gonna Rain No More 

Oh, Them Golden Slippers 

Tiny Clark calling Square Dances, 

Asch Album A 344 M jj. 122452 

Musis 'fcqr Hr and Hra Seller 

Asch R*$fa$ o.| :Nw : Tfta* ' r g ten%$i words 



tl* 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 407 

2. Darling Nellie Gray 

Big Eared Mule; Cricket and Bullfrog; Light-Foot Bill 
(without call) 

3. Little Brown Jug 

Virginia Reel; Grand March; Finale (without call) 

Ed Durlacher calling Country Dances, 

Sonora Album 479 M.M. 116-132 

Music by The Top Hands 
Sonora Radio and Television Corp., 

Chicago, Illinois 4 ten-inch records 

1. Nelly Ely 

Virginia Reel (Contra Dance) 

2. Uptown Downtown 

Sanita Hill (Circle Dance) 

3. Red River Valley 

Loobie Lou Skip to My Lou (Play Party) 

4. You Did It So Well, So Do It Again 

Back to Back 

Ed Durlacher calling Square Dances, 

Decca Album 474 (old, 229) M.M. 120-130 

Music by Al McLeod's Country Dance Band 
Decca Record Co., New York 3 twelve-inch records 

1. She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain 

Billy Boy 

2. The Grapevine Twist 

Dip and Dive 

3. Mademoiselle from Armentieres 

Cowboy's Dream (Waltz) 

Floyd Woodhull calling Square Dances, 

Victor Albrtte C-36 M.M. 120-130 

Mu$i<j by Woodhuirs Oide Tyme Masters 
RCA Victor, Caraden, New Jersey 4 l twelve^inch records 

t Oh 
Fop 

n J%d$ , 

to" -of %& Own 



* ; very 

' 



408 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Lawrence V. Loy calling Square Dance, 

Victor Album P 155 M.M. 124-128 

Music by Carson Robison and his Pleasant Valley Boys 
RCA Victor, Camden, New Jersey 4 ten-inch records 

1. Spanish Cavaliero 

Irish Washerwoman (without call) 

2. Solomon Levi 

Comin' Round the Mountain 

3. Jingle Bells 

Paddy Dear 

4. Golden Slippers 

Turkey in the Straw 

Lawrence V. Loy calling Square Dances, 

M-G-M Album 5 M.M. 122-128 

Music by Carson Robison and his Square Dance Music 
M-G-M Co. (a division of Loews, Inc.) , 

New York 4 ten-inch records 

1. A Hook and a Whirl 

Head Couples Separate 

2. Lady Round the Lady 

The Devil's Britches (without call) 

3. Bob's favorite 

The Maverick 

4. When the Work's AH Done This Fall 

Pokeberry Promenade 

Paul Conklin calling Siving Your Partner, 

Victor Album C-34 M.M. 118-126 

Music by Bill Dickinson's Tuxedo Colonels 
RCA Victor, Camden, New Jersey 3 twelve-inch records 

and 1 ten-inch record 

1. Hodge Quadrille No. 1 

Hodge Quadrille No. 2 

2. Buffalo Gals 

Chasse Your Partner 

3. Darling Nellie Gray 

pBefe; the Oyster 

4. Lafy Bound the L**Jy 

|4f & O^ tfee Qoean Wave 



straight 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 409 

Manny calling Margo Mayo's Square Dance, 

Keynote Album K-130 M.M. 92-126 

Music by the American Square Dance Orchestra 
Keynote Recordings, Inc., New York 3 ten-inch records 

1. Chicken Reel 

Double Chassez 

2. Silent Couple 

Preakness Quadrille 

3. Medley (without calls) 

New Portland Fancy 
Note. A cross between prompting and patter calling. 

Phil Green calling Square Dances, 

Franwil Album 1-A M.M. 110-124 

Music by Phil Green's Band 
Franwil Records 3 ten-inch records 

(Write to Phil Green, 323 Central Street, Springfield, 
Massachusetts) 

1. Spanish Cavalier 

Roll Along Covered Wagon 

2. Listen to the Mockingbird 

McNamara's Band 

3. Sioux City Sue 

Captain Jenks 

Note. Phil Green has announced the following records under the 
Square Dance label, to be released in the early summer of 1949, 

1. My Little Girl 

Mariana 

2. The Waltz Promenade 

Home Sweet Home 

3. Casey Jones 

Clancy Lowered the Boom 

Burold Groodf ellow calling Square Dances, 

B^Iidwagxm Album M.M. 132-138 

Music t>y The Pore OF Tired Texans 

Bandwagon Record Co. 3 twelve-inch records 

(Write to Harold Goodfellow, 205 114th Road, St. Albans, 
NT.) 
3U Hopkin's Turn 

Loch Lomond 
2. Deep in the Heart of Texas 

FofW&rd Up Six and Ba<?k 
t. Jolty Iri^ntap 

Hot Tie in tfee 0W f own Tonight 



410 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

Ralph Page calling New England Square Dances, 

Disc Album No. 630 M.M. 114-120 

Music by his New England Orchestra 
Disc Record Co., New York 3 ten-inch records 

1. Red River Valley 

Disgusted Brides 

2. Odd Couple in the Center 

Monadnock Muddle 

3. Star the Ring 

Ladies Whirligig 



Ed Durlacher calling Honor Your Partner, 

Square Dance Associates Albums M.M. 114-120 

Music by The Top Hands 

Square Dance Associates, 102 North Columbus Avenue, 
Freeport, Long Island, N.Y. Three albums, each of 

3 twelve-inch records 
Album I 

1. Susanna 

Two Head Gents Cross Over 

2. Heads and Sides 

Around the Outside 

3. Honolulu Baby 

Do-si-do and Swing 

Album II 

1. Yankee Doodle 

Push Her Away 

2. Sweet Alice 

Darling Nellie Gray 

3. Duck for the Oyster 

Ladies Chain 

Album III 

1. Loch Lomond 

The Basket 

2. Ladies Grand Chain 

My Little Girl (M.M. 124) 



fyotb Hsnd L&<Jy Pass Under 

Note. SitaiBtotfcaffy t The first half of e&cji rew$ &$ is gtveu over 
to spoke* tafeftcitionfft H* second featf to ,tfe* d&fyfi^, VWth xattrt be 

' ' * ' ' 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 411 

Lawrence V. Loy calling Square Dances, 

Columbia Album C-47 M.M. 106-112 

Music by Carson Robison and his Old Timers 
Columbia Records, Inc., New York 4 ten-inch records 

1. The First Two Ladies Cross Over 

Darling Nellie Gray 

2. Buffalo Boy Go Round the Outside 

Oh Susanna 

3. Dive for the Oyster 

Dive for the Oyster (continued) 

4. Little Brown Jug (without call) 

Possum in the 'Simmon Tree (without call) 



RELATED DANCE ALBUMS 

There are related dance forms that are sometimes ,in- 
cluded in the term "square dance/' but they have not been 
treated in this book: the formal quadrilles, the running 
sets, the longways or contra dances, and the play-party 
games. If you wish to refer to record albums of these old 
quadrilles, you cannot do better than write to Henry Ford, 
Dearborn, Michigan, and ask for the list of records ; or you 
may write to Scott Colburn, Department B, 408 South 
Fourth Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

For the other forms you cannot do better than refer to 
the fine set of Decca albums put out by Margo Mayo and her 
American Square Dance Group. They are as follows : 
Quadrilles, Decca Album 617 
Running Set, Decca Album 274 
Long Ways Dance, Decca Album 275 
Pl&y Party Games, Pecca Album 2.78 

ROUND DANCES 

For a eQiripietf 1% o| \tt>tox$p Of the many different 

ROTO* ^aii^set'f^i'llAl 1 &w*\&$k by Uoy# ^haw, 

published by, f W Fff&ters, ltd, of Caldwell, Idaho, 

For the f ew J$tewl Rowd Daises fiven in Chapter 4 

K8QOP& -Ubte albums listed 
'i6te^ 



412 PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

TWO-STEP: 

Any square dance music in 2/4 time will prove quite 
satisfactory. Some folks prefer the old ragtime tunes. 
You will find some excellent ones on Imperial Records 
by Harley Luse and his Blue Ridge Mountain Boys 
such as "Rainbow," Imperial 1009, or "Silver Bell/' Im 
perial 1010. 

WALTZ : 

The "Missouri Waltz" is still, perhaps, the old-time 
favorite. You will find it and many others in Popular 
American Waltzes, played by Al Goodman and his Or 
chestra in the Columbia Album C-26. 

If you prefer a faster tempo, try Victor Herbert 
Waltzes, played by Harry Horlick and his Orchestra, 
Decca Album 82. 

RYE WALTZ : 

Try Record No. 1044B in Imperial Album FD 9, 
played by Harley Luse, or try the "Rye Waltz" in the 
Les Gotcher album noted at the end of the Square 
Dance list. 

VARSOUVIANNA : 

If you don't find anything to suit you in the albums 
listed above, try "Hungarian Varsovienne," Henry 
Ford record 103-A, or "Put Your Little Foot" by Louie 
and his Old Time Band, Globe record 5002, 

POLKAS : 

Every library of square dance records contains 
several polkas, but if you need another try the "Hot 
Clarinet Polka/ 1 Standard record T 121, or, in slower 
time, the "Heel and Toe Polka," Henry Ford record 
107-A. 

If you would like an album of nothing but polkas, try 
"I<et'& Polka/' by Bill Gale and his Music Makers, 
Collegia Album 0*56, 



g^twre dtatt* alfepms throw i*x a $chotfcisc$ie 

o fenixfc iif ; n stogie 



PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 413 

record, try "Starlight Schottische" by Louie Massey 
and the Westerners, Columbia record No. 20117, or 
"California Schottische" by Harley Luse and his Or 
chestra, record No. 1046B from the Imperial Album 
FD9. 

If you want an album of nothing but schottisches, 
try the Decca Album 220, which goes under that name. 



HARD TO GET RECORDS 

Local music stores sometimes do not carry these special 
records, and they frequently seem to have a hard time 
ordering them. If you should have trouble, it might.be well 
for you to write to some company that makes a specialty of 
these records. You may order directly from -them or ask 
them to keep you posted on any special type of record you 
need. For this service I would suggest 

Bob Osgood 

152 N. Swall Drive 

Los Angeles 36, California 

Ed Kremers 

262 O'Farrel Street, Room 301 

San Francisco 2, California 

Michael Herman 

P.O. Box 201 

Flushing, Long Island, N.Y. 

Charley Thomas 
121 Delaware Street 
Woodbury, New Jersey 



r 



J 
V. 



Index 



Adam and Eve, 228 

Adams, James Barton, 24 

Alabam', Run Away to, 316 

Allemande left, 47 

AUemande six, 278 

Alligator, 252 

Anderson, Sherwood, 7 

Arch and Under for the Length of the 

Han, 343 
Arch, Inside, 341 
Arkansas Traveler, 390 
Arkansaw, Old, 230 
Around that couple with the lady in the 

lead, 195 
At a Cowboy Dance, 28 

Back to the Bar. 310 

Balance, 136 

Ballonet, The Lady, 18& 

Beginnings ca*, 148; discussion. 121 

Birdie in a Cage and Allemande Six, 278 

Birdie in the Center and Seven Hands 

Round, 241 - 

Bow and Kneel to That Lady, 234 
Bow Knot, 3&8 
Buffalo Gals, 382 
Buffaloes and Injun*, 254 
Butterfly Whtrt The, 13 



Call Books, 26 

" " 



r sets out on floor, 104 
i Jink% 




.pfar awl 8l<les SwinjK, 812 

of 

eatftral 

Chaine anglaise, 50 
Chain, ladies, 127 
Change and Swing Half, 215 
Cheat and Swing, 232 

Varjsouvianna, 
, tft . 
i dancers, 148 




Dad Eads, 35 

Dances types, 123 

Devil's Dream, 390 

Dive and Rescue the Lady, 361 

Dive for the Oyster, 197 

Divide, Sides, 314 

Divide the Ring and Corners Bow, 294 

Divide the Ring and Cut Away Four, 286 

Divide the Ring and Docey Partners, 292 

Divide the Ring and Forward Up Six, 298 

Divide the Ring and Swing Corners, 290 

Divide the Ring and Waltz Corners, 300 

Rivide the Ring combination, 2*6 

Divide-the-Ring type, see Split-the-Ring 

Docey-doe discussion, 104; calls, 160 

Docey-doe type, 131 

Docey Out As She Comes In, 238 

Docey partners, 292 

Dollar Whirl The, 191 

Don't You Touch Her. 244 

Dos-a-dos, 105 

Do-si-dov 104 

Double Bow Knot, 858 

Double Elbow, 157 

Durang, 887 

Eads, Dad, 85 

Eight, Figure, 267 

Eight, Forward and Back, 856 

Eight Hands Over, 200 

Elbow, Double, 157 

Elbow Swing, 172 

Endings caHa, 151; discussion, 121 

English chain, 50 

English Dancing Master, Playfoxd, 30* 

Exhibition dancing, 142 

fiddle**, 36 

Fiddle tunea, 35 

figure Eight, 267 

Finish phrases, 160 

First Dance, 38 

Flap Those Girls and Flap Like Thunder, 

200 

Follow up second couple, 185 
Ford, Henry, 2& 
Form a Star, 167 
Form a Star with the Right Hand Cross, 

62 

Forward and Back Eight, 366 
Forward Six and Fall Back Eight, 261 
Forward Six and Fap Bade Stic, <T6 
Forward S^ Divide ths Rfci*. 2S 
Forward W Six, 2&8 
Four amd twenty, 8S5 
Four Gents Cross Right Hands, 864 



416 



INDEX 



Four Gents Lead Out, 308 
Four in a Center Line, 264 
Four Leaf Clover, 280 
Four White Horses, 391 

Gal, Yaller, 252 

Gent So Low, 117 

Geometric sense, 41 

Girl I Left Behind Me, The, 184, 382 

Go Halfway Round Again, 246 

Golden Slippers, 383 

Good Morning:, 28 

Go Round and Through, 180 

Grand March Change, 336 

Grand Right and Left, 47 

Grapevine Twist, 271 

Grapevine Twist, Garden Variety, 276 

Head of the hall, 57 
Heel and Toe Polka, 92 
Hens and Chickens, 386 
Hey, 50 

Him and Her, 182 
Honest John, 378 
Honor That Lady, 236 
Howard, Emerson G., 34 
Hull's Victory, 33, 388 

IT! Swing Your Girl; You Swing Mine, 

176 

Indian Circle, 282 
Injuns and Buffaloes, 254 
Inside Arch, 341 
Instruments, 36 
Intermingling type, 139 
Introductions calls, 148; discussion*, 121 
Irish Washerwoman, 378 
Irregular types, 141 
I Wonder, 880 

Johnny's Down the River, 381 

Kelleher, Mary, 87 
Kentucky Running Set, 29 
Kingdom Come, 384 
Kneel to that lady, 234 

Ladies chain, 127 

Ladies Change, Three, 346 

Ladies to the Center, 310 

Lady Rallonet, 189 

Lady -Go Halfway Round Again, 246 

Lady Round the Lady, 170 

Lady Round the Lady and the Gent So 

Low. The. 117 
Lady Round Two, The. 195 
Lady Walks Round, The, 189 
Lamp Lighter, 389 
Length of the HaU, Inside Arch, 843 
Length of the Hajl, Right and Left, 351 
Length of the Hall, Three Ladies Change, 

Levin, Ida, 29 
Little children, 143 

March, Gra^d, 836 
Minson, "Smokey," 85 
Music, 33 



Nellie Bly, 384 



Opposite across the hall, 121 
Original dances, 142 
Origins of dances, 26 
Over and Under, 341 
Oyster, Dive for the, 197 

Page, Tolman and, 31 

Parker, Guy, 11 

Pigtown Hoe Down, 388 

Playford's English Dancing Master, 30 

Pokey Nine, 321 

Polka, 90 

Pop Goes the Weasel, 123, 393 

Positions in Squares, 57 

Promenade in single file, 122 

Promenade the Inside Ring, 208 

Promenade the Outside Ring, 138 

Promenade the Outside Ring and Docey 

Doe, 206 

Promenade Your Corners Round, 249 
Pursuit Waltz, 97 

Quadrille, New England, 27 
Quadrille, The Singing, 324 
Quadrille, Waltz, 303 

Rattlesnake Twist, 274 

Redowa, 94 

Reel, Virginia, 124 

Rescue the Lady, 361 

Right and Left, 211 

Right and Left Back and Both Couples 

Swing, 222 

Right and Left Four and Six, 217 
Right and Left Four and the Center 

Couple Swing, 220 
Right and left grand, 47 
Right and left through, 127 
Right and Left Through and Swing That 

Girl Behind You, 224 
Right and Left Through the JLength of 

the Hall, 351 
Right and Left with the Couple You 

Meet, 208 

Romping Molly, 381 
Round and Through, 180 
Round dances, 70 
Run Away to Alabam', 316 
Running Set, 29 
Rye Waltz, 71, 894 

Schottische, 73, 398 

Second couple follow up, 136 

Sharp, Cecil, 29 

Sides Divide, 214 

Singing QuadriHe, The, 824 

Single file, 122 

Single Visitor type* 188 

Six Forward, Eight FaH Back, 261 

Six Forward, Fall Back Six, 258 

"Smokey" Mfetfon, 5 

Soldier's Joy, 88 

So-So Polka, 394 

Spanish Waltz, Wl 





INDEX 



417 



Swing at the Wall, 178 

Swing the Right Hand Gent with the 

Right Hand Round, 241 
Swing your opposite across the hall, 121 
Swing Your Opposite All Alone, 213 
Symmetrical type, 138 



Take Her Right Along, 250 

Three Ladies Change, 346 

Three Ladies Change the Length of the 

Hall, 349 
Tip, 58 

Tolman and Page, 81 
Tunes, fiddle, 35 
Turkey in the Straw, 389 
Twtet, Grapevine, 271 
Twist, Grapevine, Garden Variety, 276 
Twist, Rattlesnake, 274 
Two Gents Swing with the Elbow Swing, 

172 

Two-Step, 46 
Two-Step, Circle, 42 
Types of dances, 123 
Types of Western square dances, 131 



Varsouvianna, 78 
Virginia Reel, 124 

Wagonner, 387 

Wall, Swing at the, 178 

Walsenburg Polka, 93 

Waltz, 94 

Waltz Corners, 300 

Waltzing in a square, 96 

Waltz, modern, 102 

Waltz, pursuit, 97 

Waltz Quadrille, 303 

Waltz, Spanish, 101 

Waltz That Girl Behind You, 331 

Waltz, turning within a square, 99 

Wave, The Ocean, 318 

Weasel, Cowboy, 123 

Weasel, Pop Goes the, 123 

White Cockade, 391 

Whoa Ho Dobbin, 385 



YaHer Gal, 252 

You Swing My Girl; 1*11 Swing Yours, 
176 



" ^ ' ^ ^ 111! V | I P 

110472